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I have a data set in R as follows

ID  Variable1  Variable2 Choice
1   1          2         1
1   2          1         0
2   2          1         1
2   2          1         1

I need to get the output table for it as under

Id Variable1-1 Variable1-2 Variable2-1 Variable2-2
1  1           0           0           1
2  0           2           2           0

Note that only those rows are counted where the choice is 1 (choice is a binary variable, however other variables have any integer values). The aim is to have as many columns for a variable as its levels.

Is there a way I can do this in R?

share|improve this question
    
it's not entirely obvious to me what you're trying to do, but you might look at the example answer in this question for some ideas: stackoverflow.com/questions/9728038/… – JD Long May 15 '12 at 11:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use melt and dcast from the reshape2 package:

mydf<-read.table(text="ID  Variable1  Variable2 Choice
1   1          2         1
1   2          1         0
2   2          1         1
2   2          1         1",header=TRUE)

library(reshape2)

First melt the data.frame, selecting only those rows where Choice == 1 and removing the Choice column

mydfM <- melt(mydf[mydf$Choice %in% 1, -match("Choice", names(mydf))], id = "ID")

# EDIT above: As @TylerRinker points out, using which could be avoided.
# I've replaced it with %in%

#   ID  variable value
# 1  1 Variable1     1
# 2  2 Variable1     2
# 3  2 Variable1     2
# 4  1 Variable2     2
# 5  2 Variable2     1
# 6  2 Variable2     1

Then cast the melted data.frame, using length as the aggregation function

(mydfC <- dcast(mydfM, ID ~ variable + value, fun.aggregate = length))

#   ID Variable1_1 Variable1_2 Variable2_1 Variable2_2
# 1  1           1           0           0           1
# 2  2           0           2           2           0
share|improve this answer
    
nice solution. +1 – Tyler Rinker May 15 '12 at 13:52
    
The which in this case is unnecessary. – Tyler Rinker May 15 '12 at 14:03
    
@Tyler, in the given example, I agree that it's not necessary. However, if there are any NAs in Choice, that would cause problems without which. Could I offer mydf$Choice %in% 1 as an improvement? – BenBarnes May 15 '12 at 14:11
    
Yeah that is a nice way to go. Good call on the NAs, didn't think about that. – Tyler Rinker May 15 '12 at 14:15
    
super. This did it for me, thanks. One more thing, I also need to export it to a csv file and am not sure about how to go about it. It is quite basic, but it would be great if you can help me on that. – hardikudeshi May 15 '12 at 16:32

It took me a while to figure out what you were after but I got it (I think). I have done what you asked but it's convoluted at best. I think this will help others see what you're after and you'll get better answers now.

dat <- read.table(text="ID  Variable1  Variable2 Choice
1   1          2         1
1   2          1         0
2   2          1         1
2   2          1         1", header=T)


A <- split(dat$Choice, list(dat$Variable1, dat$ID))
B <- split(dat$Choice, list(dat$Variable2, dat$ID))
C <- list(A, B)

FUN <- function(x) sapply(x, function(y) sum(y))

FUN2 <- function(x){
    len <- length(x)/2
    rbind(x[1:len], x[(len+1):length(x)])
}

dat2 <- do.call('data.frame', lapply(lapply(C, FUN), FUN2))
colnames(dat2) <- c('Variable1-1', 'Variable1-2', 'Variable2-1', 
    'Variable2-2')
dat2

This ain't you're grandmother's contingency table that's for sure. Probably there's a much better way to accomplish all of this, maybe with reshape.

share|improve this answer
    
... or reshape2! – BenBarnes May 15 '12 at 13:45
    
@BenBarnes I actually meant the function reshape not the package but those packages hadn't even occurred to me. Likely they'd make light work of this. – Tyler Rinker May 15 '12 at 13:49
    
Oh I see you did answer with reshape2 +1 – Tyler Rinker May 15 '12 at 13:50

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