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I have a file that contains pairs of lines that look like this:

 FIRST PIECE OF INFO
 PIECE 2 | PIECE 3 | PIECE 4 | ...

I need to output this:

FIRST PIECE OF INFO\tPIECE 2\tPIECE 3 ...

An I also need to do some more regexp magic on the lines themselves.

Can this be done using a perl one-liner? My problem here is that using -p will handle the file one line at a time, whereas I need to deal with two lines at a time. My solution was first running another one-liner that removes all linebreaks from the file (I had another separator between different pairs of lines) but this seems too cumbersome and I'm sure there's a better way.

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Why do you insist on a one-line Perl program? – Borodin May 15 '12 at 7:30
    
I do not insist - in the end I did it with more than one line. However, it is my experience that in Perl one liners have an amazing power and so maybe I'm just missing something basic. – Gadi A May 15 '12 at 7:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, the simple solution is to turn all the newlines and pipes into tabs. It sounds a bit crazy, but at first glance, it does sound like what you want:

perl -pwe 'tr/\n|/\t\t/' yourfile.txt

But there is something that does not match up with your problem description. You say:

I have a file that contains pairs of lines

Which would mean that your file actually looks something like this:

FIRST PIECE OF INFO
PIECE 2 | PIECE 3 | PIECE 4 | ...
SECOND PIECE OF INFO
PIECE 2a | PIECE 3b | PIECE 4b | ...
THIRD... etc

In which case blindly transliterating the newlines would put everything on a single line. Now, my interpretation of this is that what you want is something like this (with tabs and newlines denoted literally):

FIRST PIECE OF INFO\tPIECE 2\tPIECE 3\tPIECE 4 | ...\n
SECOND PIECE OF INFO\tPIECE 2a\tPIECE 3b\tPIECE 4b | ...\n

This is not achieved with a simple transliteration.

perl -plwe 'next if !/\S/; $_ = join "\t", $_, split /\s*\|\s*/,<>;' file.txt

Note: The next if !/\S/; statement is only to prevent the stream from being paused at the end in case the file contains an odd number of lines. If it does, the file handle <> will try to read from STDIN, and you will need to press Ctrl-D to manually stop it.

The Data::Dumper output looks like this, with $Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1 showing whitespace characters:

$VAR1 = "FIRST PIECE OF INFO\tPIECE 2\tPIECE 3\tPIECE 4\t...\n";
$VAR1 = "SECOND PIECE OF INFO\tPIECE 2a\tPIECE 3b\tPIECE 4b\t...\n";

The one-liner for the above output looks like this, somewhat rewritten:

perl -MData::Dumper -nlwe '
    $Data::Dumper::Useqq=1; 
    next if !/\S/; 
    $_ = join "\t", $_, split /\s*\|\s*/,<>; 
    print Dumper $_;' file.txt
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I can't help you with the more regexp magic without knowing what it is, but this will combine the lines as your describe

perl -lne 'print join "\t", $_, split /\|/, <ARGV>' myfile
share|improve this answer
    
"More regexp magic" simply means that I do additional changes to the lines. – Gadi A May 15 '12 at 7:32
    
I realise that, but I can't integrate those changes into my solution without understanding what they are. – Borodin May 15 '12 at 13:35

Yet another approach:

perl -pe'$"="\t";chomp;$_="@{[$_,split q(\|),<>]}"'
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