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I'm working on a project, implemented in Perl, and thought it would be an idea to use threads to distribute the work, because the tasks can be done independent of each other and only reading from shared data in memory. However, the performance is nowhere near as I expect it to be. So after some investigation I can only conclude that threads in Perl basically suck, but I keep wondering the performance goes down the drain as soon as I implement one single shared variable.

For example, this little program has nothing shared and consumes 75% of the CPU (as expected):

use threads;

sub fib {
  my ( $n ) = @_;
  if ( $n < 2 ) {
     return $n;
  } else {
     return fib( $n - 1 ) + fib( $n - 2 );
  }
}

my $thr1 = threads->create( 'fib', 35 );
my $thr2 = threads->create( 'fib', 35 );
my $thr3 = threads->create( 'fib', 35 );

$thr1->join;
$thr2->join;
$thr3->join;

And as soon as I introduce a shared variable $a, the CPU usage is somewhere between 40% and 50%:

use threads;
use threads::shared;

my $a : shared;
$a = 1000;

sub fib {
  my ( $n ) = @_;
  if ( $n < 2 ) {
    return $n;
  } else {
    return $a + fib( $n - 1 ) + fib( $n - 2 ); # <-- $a was added here
  }
}

my $thr1 = threads->create( 'fib', 35 );
my $thr2 = threads->create( 'fib', 35 );
my $thr3 = threads->create( 'fib', 35 );

$thr1->join;
$thr2->join;
$thr3->join;

So $a is read-only and no locking takes place, and yet the performance decreases. I'm curious why this happens.

At the moment I'm using Perl 5.10.1 under Cygwin on Windows XP. Unfortunately I couldn't test this on a non-Windows machine with a (hopefully) more recent Perl.

share|improve this question
    
Locking does take place. Because each thread has no way to know whether or not another thread is trying to modify $a at the same time it's trying to read it, the implementation must lock $a during that read operation. Essentially, your test code is a tight loop around a lock. –  David Schwartz May 15 '12 at 9:05
    
But I do know that $a is not modified, is there no way to add hints to indicate that no locking is required? –  Bram Schoenmakers May 15 '12 at 9:11
    
Don't mark $a shared. Marking a variable shared specifically indicates that changes should be synchronized across threads. Or, better yet, create a new variable called $b that's not shared and do $a = $b; once for each thread to set its $b to the correct one. That way each thread reads the shared variable only once. –  David Schwartz May 15 '12 at 9:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code is a tight loop around a synchronized structure. Optimize it by having each thread copy the shared variable -- just once for each thread -- into an unshared variable.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, thank you. Copying the data will not scale for me, so using threads is not the way to go after all. –  Bram Schoenmakers May 15 '12 at 9:25
2  
If you can't avoid a tight loop around a synchronized structure, threads are probably not the way to go. –  David Schwartz May 15 '12 at 9:46
1  
@BramSchoenmakers: The example code you pasted is clearly not your real code, since you can trivially avoid the sharing in this simple case. But the extreme performance loss is due to the "toy" nature of the code too -- being such a tight loop around a single shared variable. In your real code, it may be much harder to use copying to avoid the sharing, but the looping will likely be much less tight and not around a single shared variable but around several different ones. So you likely will not see this extreme performance loss in real code. –  David Schwartz May 15 '12 at 19:40
    
indeed, I'm not interested in the outcome of fib(35) :) In my project I have one large data structure in memory and I'm doing a number of computations based on that, and many steps somehow involve this shared data. The data is read-only and the computations can be performed independent of each other, so that's why I thought I could just share the data and omit lock() altogether. –  Bram Schoenmakers May 16 '12 at 7:16
2  
If you construct the data structure in regular variables and then create the threads, they'll all see that structure without locks and without it having to be shared. Just make sure all the threads are finished before you modify the structure. –  David Schwartz May 16 '12 at 7:31

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