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I have an application to track the page visits for a website. Here's my model:

public class VisitSession {
    public string SessionId { get; set; }
    public DateTime StartTime { get; set; }
    public string UniqueVisitorId { get; set; }
    public IList<PageVisit> PageVisits { get; set; }
}

When a visitor go to the website, a visit session starts. One visit session has many page visits. The tracker will write a UniqueVisitorId (GUID) cookie when the first time a visitor go to the website. So we are able to know if a visitor is returning visitor.

Now, I want to know how many unique visitors visited the website in a date range. That is, I want to display a table in our webpage like this;

Date        | Unique Visitors Count
------------+-----------------------
2012-05-01  | 100
2012-05-02  | 1000
2012-05-03  | 120

I want to create an index to do this in RavenDB. But I don't know how to write the Map/Reduce query. I though it can be like this:

public class UniqueVisitor_ByDate : AbstractIndexCreationTask<VisitSession, UniqueVisitorByDate>
{
    public UniqueVisitor_ByDate()
    {
        Map = sessions => from s in sessions
                            select new
                            {
                                s.StartTime.Date,
                                s.UniqueVisitorId
                            };

        Reduce = results => from result in results
                            group result by result.Date into g
                            select new
                            {
                                Date = g.Key,
                                UniqueVisitorCount = g.Distinct()
                            };
    }
}

But it's not working. In Ayende's e-book, I know that the result of Map function should be same as the result of Reduce function. So how can I write the correct map/reduce functions?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This index should do what you want:

public class UniqueVisitor_ByDate : AbstractIndexCreationTask<VisitSession, UniqueVisitorByDate>
{
    public UniqueVisitor_ByDate()
    {
        Map = sessions => from s in sessions
                          select new 
                                     {
                                         s.StartTime.Date,
                                         s.UniqueVisitorId,
                                         Count = 1,
                                     };

        Reduce = results => from result in results
                            group result by result.Date
                            into g
                            select new UniqueVisitorByDate
                                       {
                                           Date = g.Key,
                                           Count = g.Select(x => x.UniqueVisitorId).Distinct().Count(),
                                           UniqueVisitorId = g.FirstOrDefault().UniqueVisitorId,
                                       };
    }
}

Note that it requires the extra 'UniqueVisitorId' property in the 'reduce' and the 'count' property in the map, but you can just ignore those.

share|improve this answer
    
But adding "UniqueVisitorId" to UniqueVisitorByDate class looks strange, is there a better solution? –  Mouhong Lin May 15 '12 at 9:32
    
Not that I'm aware of. You could change the name of the property to something like 'TempId_DO_NOT_USE' to indicate that it shouldn't be used in your application. –  Simon May 15 '12 at 9:38
1  
@DylanLin UniqueVisitorId has to be part of UniqueVisitorByDate because Map and Reduce must produce objects of the same shape. –  Thomas Freudenberg May 15 '12 at 10:03
    
But still made the UniqueVisitorByDate class not elegant :( –  Mouhong Lin May 15 '12 at 10:03
1  
Elegance or pragmatism... in this case, as that class is only used to display the results and isn't part of your domain or business logic I think it's a small price to pay for an index that actually works! :-) –  Simon May 15 '12 at 10:07

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