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Can we make our own List<string, string, string> in C#.NET? I need to make a list having 3 different strings as a single element in the list.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can certainly create your own class called List with three generic type parameters. I would strongly discourage you from doing so though. It would confuse the heck out of anyone using your code.

Instead, either use List<Tuple<string, string, string>> (if you're using .NET 4, anyway) or (preferrably) create your own class to encapsulate those three strings in a meaningful way, then use List<YourNewClass>.

Creating your own class will make it much clearer when you're writing and reading the code - by giving names to the three different strings involved, everyone will know what they're meant to mean. You can also give more behaviour to the class as and when you need to.

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how fetch back the values from the List of Tuple created ? – HotTester May 15 '12 at 9:22
    
@HotTester : what do you mean by fetch back the values? – Arion May 15 '12 at 9:24
1  
@HotTester: Use the properties of Tuple<,,> - but it'll be a lot less readable than creating your own class. – Jon Skeet May 15 '12 at 9:28
1  
@HotTester: Yes, by creating your own type. If you are dead set against creating a new type, you could (ab)use cast by example – Brian May 15 '12 at 14:33
1  
@HotTester: That's exactly the point of creating your own type (and potentially giving it behaviour, etc). You can't change the properties of Tuple, but you can create your own classes with your own properties... – Jon Skeet May 15 '12 at 14:35

You can use a Tuple to achieve that.

For example:

var list = new List<Tuple<string,string,string>>();

to iterate over the values you may want to do a simple:

    list.ForEach(x=>{
     //x is a Tuple
    });

or to find some specific tupple, you may want to do the folowing:

     var list = new List<Tuple<string,string,string>>{
        new Tuple<string,string,string>("Hello", "Holla", "Ciao"),
        new Tuple<string,string,string>("Buy", "--", "Ciao")
     };

     list.Where(x=>x.Item2 == "--");

This will return the last Tuple.

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Maybe something like this:

var ls= new List<Tuple<string,string,string>>();
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I recommend this solution

 public class MyCustomClass
    {
        public string MyString1 { get; set; }
        public string MyString2 { get; set; }
        public string MyString3 { get; set; }
    }

    class MyApp
    {
        public MyApp()
        {
            List<MyCustomClass> customList = new List<MyCustomClass>();
            customList.Add(new MyCustomClass
            {
                MyString1 = "Hello",
                MyString2 = "Every",
                MyString3 = "Body",
            });
        }
    }
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You can use a list of tuples. Like so:

List<Tuple<string, string, string>>
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For example:

var list = new List<Tuple<string, string, string>>();
var tuple = Tuple.Create("a", "b", "c");
list.Add(tuple);

For more information, look in MSDN.

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1  
Thank link is very... Russian. Good thing i can read "Россия (Pусский)". – felickz Feb 26 '13 at 20:59

How about making a List<Tuple<string, string, string>> ?

A better idea might be though, if each of the strings has a specific meaning, to put them all into a class and then create a List of that.

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No, sadly this does't work. The best you can do is to create a List of Lists, or utilise some form of implementation of the IDictionary interface.

Although, that said, if you have three items of data which belong together in this manner, it's probably worthwhile creating a class to contain them.

That would then give you the opportunity to pass a List around your application and assign meaningful names to each data item. Never underestimate the power of readability six months down the line.

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Actually scratch that, @Tigran's solution is not only better than mine, it taught me something I didn't know. Nice one. – inksmithy May 15 '12 at 9:24

You may define a List and implement the needed interfaces(such as IList). Codes blow.

public class List<T1, T2, T3> : IList
{

    #region IList Members

    public int Add(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public bool Contains(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public int IndexOf(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Insert(int index, object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public bool IsFixedSize
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public void Remove(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public object this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
        set
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region ICollection Members

    public void CopyTo(Array array, int index)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public bool IsSynchronized
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public object SyncRoot
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable Members

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    #endregion
}

However, List<Tuple<string,string,string>> is recommended.

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public class Listt< T, T1, T2>
    {
         public Listt()
        {

        }
        public void Add(T item, T1 item1, T2 item3)
        {

        }
    }


public partial class MyApp : Window
{

 public MyApp()

 {

  InitializeComponent();

     Listt<string, string, string> customList = new Listt<string, string, string>();
     customList.Add("we","are","here");

  }
}
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