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I have a code like this (C++):

namespace models
{
    class model
    {
        private:
            ui::window* win;
    };
}

namespace ui
{
    class window
    {
        private:
            models::model* modl;
    };
}

As you can see its such a shout-rising hell. As you well know this code doesn't compile, unless I provide a forward declaration for window before models, which is not rational to do so in general, since the above is not the entire code and also the code will be expanding.

Is there a systematic approach to this?

share|improve this question
    
Don't create cyclic dependencies is usually the best solution. –  Pubby May 15 '12 at 9:19
    
ok, how do I change this? –  Haix64 May 15 '12 at 9:22
    
Well it depends on what the classes do. I'll let you figure the design out. –  Pubby May 15 '12 at 9:23
    
What is wrong with the mindset of a cyclic design, in general? Shouldn't it ever show up in any design anywhere at all in the field of computer programming? –  Haix64 May 15 '12 at 9:27
3  
Of course there exist designs where they work, but generally they're not worth the trouble they cause. The Wikipedia page lists some problems: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_dependency –  Pubby May 15 '12 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

unless I provide a forward declaration for window before models, which is not rational to do so in general

Actually, it is. You should use forward declarations instead of inclusions or full definitions wherever possible.

But most important, your design looks awckward at least.

EDIT: Per request, code with forward declarations:

namespace ui
{
    class window;
}
namespace models
{
    class model
    {
        private:
            ui::window* win;
    };
}

//required if this is in a different file
namespace models
{
    class model;
}
namespace ui
{
    class window
    {
        private:
            models::model* modl;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Then, what kind of design would you propose for this problem? –  Haix64 May 15 '12 at 9:21
    
Didn't downvote but the OP states above is not the entire code and also the code will be expanding. Forward Declaration works only as long as the compiler need not need to know the memory layouts of the type.Given that the fully expanded code can't just do with Forward declarations.OP is asking for an systematic approach to this hell? –  Alok Save May 15 '12 at 9:22
1  
@ai64: Using abstract interfaces would be a good start; have the model interact with an abstract view interface rather than a concrete ui::window class. –  Mike Seymour May 15 '12 at 9:24
1  
@ai64 edited... –  Luchian Grigore May 15 '12 at 9:30
1  
It is impossible to create circular dependencies for embedded structs/classes (both syntactically and logically), but circular pointers, such as these, are absolutely normal practice, and are completely necessary for many tree/list/graph type data structures. They are achieved exactly as in @LuchianGrigore's answer. In fact the syntax is defined this way exactly for this purpose (that and modular abstraction). –  ams May 15 '12 at 9:46

Next would be a solution to break cyclic dependency.
The observer pattern would be more flexible.

namespace models
{
    class modelUser
    {
       virtual void handleModelUpdate() = 0;
       virtual ~modelUser
    }
    class model
    {
        public:
            model(modelUser* user) : mUser(user) { }
        private:
            modelUser* mUser;
    };
}

namespace ui
{
    class window: public models::modelUser
    {
        private:
            models::model* modl;
            virtual void handleModelUpdate() { std::cout << "update from model\n"; }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
But this is a totally different design. Not only you inherit from modelUser, which probably is wrong, but also modelUser no longer has a pointer to a window. –  Luchian Grigore May 15 '12 at 9:39
    
@LuchianGrigore different design, but removing some of the flaws of the original. Assuming OP wants some kind of MVC, M shouldn't know anything about windows. –  juanchopanza May 15 '12 at 9:41
    
@juanchopanza removing some but adding others. I think inheriting from modelUser is actually worse that what he already has. –  Luchian Grigore May 15 '12 at 9:45
    
@stefaanv Thanks for this asnwer. However observer is more suitable when it comes to a fully MVCized implementation. In my current project, where total number of windows doesn't exceed 10 there's just 1 "top" window with a few "under/slave/..." windows, the borders between M, V and C are so blurry. In fact when I begun writing I told myself "There's no need for such a Controller thing! :-D ". Anyway, thanks for your answer. –  Haix64 May 15 '12 at 9:50
    
@LuchianGrigore: obviously, you would pass a window object to model, but the model object shouldn't care whether its user has a pointer to it or not. I honestly don't see what is worse in this solution (unless window and model must be entangled) –  stefaanv May 15 '12 at 9:58

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