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I'am porting pro*c codes from UNIX to LINUX. The codes are compiled and created executables successfully. But during run time its raising segmentation fault. I debugged the code step by step and the below is the output of GDB debug.

 Breakpoint 4 at 0x3b19690f50
 (gdb) n
 525             strftime (buf, MAX_STRING_LEN, "%d/%b/%Y:%H:%M:%S", dummy_time);
 (gdb) n

 Breakpoint 4, 0x0000003b19690f50 in strftime () from /lib64/libc.so.6
 (gdb) n
 Single stepping until exit from function strftime,
 which has no line number information.
 0x0000003b19690f70 in strftime_l () from /lib64/libc.so.6
 (gdb) n
 Single stepping until exit from function strftime_l,
 which has no line number information.

 Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
 0x0000003b19690f8b in strftime_l () from /lib64/libc.so.6

Actually in code the function strftime() is called. But I have no idea why it is reaching strftime_l() in /lib64/libc.so.6.

This issue is not coming in UNIX. please help on this. code is

static void speed_hack_libs(void)
{
    time_t dummy_time_t = time(NULL);
    struct tm *dummy_time = localtime (&dummy_time_t);
    struct tm *other_dummy_time = gmtime (&dummy_time_t);
    char buf[MAX_STRING_LEN];
    strftime (buf, MAX_STRING_LEN, "%d/%b/%Y:%H:%M:%S", dummy_time);
}
share|improve this question
    
please add the code to your question by editing it. –  dwalter May 15 '12 at 10:33
    
Better update the title! Nevermind Linux is a Unix(-like system)... –  user529758 May 15 '12 at 11:12
    
What's the value of MAX_STRING_LEN? –  ott-- May 15 '12 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
struct tm *dummy_time = localtime (&dummy_time_t);
struct tm *other_dummy_time = gmtime (&dummy_time_t);

This is not gonna work. From the man page:

The localtime() function converts the calendar time timep to broken-down time representation, expressed relative to the user's specified time-zone. ... The return value points to a statically allocated struct which might be overwritten by subsequent calls to any of the date and time functions.

The gmtime() function converts the calendar time timep to broken-down time representation, expressed in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). It may return NULL when the year does not fit into an integer. The return value points to a statically allocated struct which might be overwritten by subsequent calls to any of the date and time functions.

So, *dummy_time will probably be overwritten by the time you use it, and contain unpredictable garbage. You should copy the data to your buffer like this:

struct tm dummy_time ;
memcpy(&dummy_time, localtime (&dummy_time_t), sizeof(struct tm));

Although I'm not sure how could this cause a SIGSEGV (might be something with getting the month names etc. - check if the problem persists with LC_ALL=C), you must fix this before you can move on. Also, check (in the debugger) the contents of *dummy_time.

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thanks a lot jpalecek!!! I modified code as you mentioned. There is no segmentation fault now!!! Thanks a lot!!!! also I set environment variable LC_ALL = C and memset(). need to check if it works without LC_ALL = C and memset(). –  bhuvana May 15 '12 at 13:24

It is calling strftime_l because you compiled 64 bit - that is the 64 bit library entry point for strftime. You have two pointers in strftime - a string and a struct tm pointer. One of them is pointing to invalid memory. jpalacek gave you where to look first.

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sorr Jim I din't understand your point It is calling strftime_l because you compiled 64 bit - that is the 64 bit library entry point for strftime –  bhuvana May 15 '12 at 13:28
    
You asked the implied question - how did I link to strftime_l? The answer is that is the symbol name for the function in the libc 64 library. Nothing is wrong. –  jim mcnamara May 15 '12 at 22:20
1  
In strftime_l, the trailing _l stands for "locale", not for "long". One function calls the other after determining the process's locale. Bare strftime does very little in this particular environment. –  Christopher Schultz Dec 29 '14 at 15:43
    
@ChristopherSchultz +1. Thanks for the correction. My system does not have that entry point. –  jim mcnamara Dec 30 '14 at 3:45
    
Yeah, it's weird... my system doesn't have a manual page for strftime_l but it does have a #define for it in /usr/local/time.h. I haven't actually tried to link against it, but I would fully expect that it does in fact exist for me. A reference for the strftime_l man page online: pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/… –  Christopher Schultz Dec 30 '14 at 15:53

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