Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an existing self coded accordian that i now need to attach an event listener to an existing fadeout event. Can I bind a new fadout listener to an existing one? And how is this done? Here is the accordian i a jsFiddle

share|improve this question
2  
There are no fadeOut event listeners. There are only animation-ready callbacks. So what do you need? –  VisioN May 15 '12 at 9:46
    
As @VisioN said, it's really hard to understand what you need, and also why would you need that. –  Roko C. Buljan May 15 '12 at 9:47
    
@VisioN +1. May be you can do one thing. If you know which element is getting fadeOut then you can apply $(ELEMENT).is(':animated') and perform operation over it. –  Bongs May 15 '12 at 9:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As others have said there isnt a fadeout event - you could create your own event though - you would add it to the callback for fadeout :

$(currentSlide).fadeOut("normal", function () {
    // your other code
    $(this).trigger('myFadeOutEvent');
});    

then you would need to listen for the event

 $('.class').on('myFadeOutEvent',function() {
    // do something
 });

See the docs for .trigger() for details

share|improve this answer

FadeOut does not have an even listener. However, it has a callback, a function that fires after the fadeout is finished. The downside with this is that you will have to specify what should happen every time you use fadeout.

This has caused miles of code for me earlier.

$('.element').fadeOut(400,function () {
    //Whatever you want to do after the fade
});
share|improve this answer

You can bind function to this element which you want to listen add do your fadout call your operation you want to apply as a call back function

share|improve this answer

Refer to the doc http://api.jquery.com/fadeOut/

It says about 2 syntaxes .fadeOut( [duration] [, callback] ) and .fadeOut( [duration] [, easing] [, callback] )

You can apply any callback function

share|improve this answer
    
This really isnt a very good answer - should probably be a comment - or deleted ! –  ManseUK May 15 '12 at 10:03
1  
check the update –  Imdad May 15 '12 at 10:08
1  
A little better - but there are already answers here with exactly the same thing ... why not upvote them instead of duplicating them ... –  ManseUK May 15 '12 at 10:09
    
It is a reference to the original document. The original document is the official reference and trusted one. The link gives more understanding than other answers. –  Imdad May 15 '12 at 10:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.