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I'm playing around with nginx rewrite rules using server and server_name. The documentation sounds simple and clear enough about the order of precedence, but I'm getting some slightly odd behaviour and want to check whether I missed anything.

I am trying to redirect anything other than www.domain.com (e.g. www.domain.net, www.domain.info) to www.domain.com. With the exception of www.domain.de to redirecto to www.domain.com/de.

I have the following rules:

server {
   server_name domain.de www.domain.de;
   rewrite ^(.*) http://www.domain.com/de$1 permanent;
}

server {
   server_name _;
   rewrite ^(.*) http://www.domain.com$1 permanent;
}

server {
   listen 80;
   server_name localhost domain.com www.domain.com;
   ...
}

However, it seems like with this ruleset, it will always redirect all non .com domains to www.domain.com/de. Whereas if I flip the first two server segments it works fine.

Am I doing something wrong? Why is the order of the rules important if the server names are explicitly specified?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The right configuration would be:

server {
   listen 80;
   server_name domain.de www.domain.de;
   return 301 http://www.domain.com/de$request_uri;
}

server {
   listen 80 default_server;
   server_name _;
   return 301 http://www.domain.com$request_uri;
}

server {
   listen 80;
   server_name "" localhost domain.com www.domain.com;
   ...
}

server_name _; is just a popular stub. The default value of the server_name directive is "" which handles requests without "Host" header. If client doesn't send it at all then server_name "" will leads to redirection loop in a configuration like yours.

Please, take a look at:

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Thanks for the detailed info and links. Things are much clearer now and using return 301 seems more appropriate than using rewrite! –  gingerlime May 15 '12 at 17:57

Using server_name _; to mean 'this is the default server' is a common mistake. It has no special meaning, and you need to use the default_server flag on the listen directive to mark that second server as default:

server {
  listen 80 default_server;
  server_name _;
  rewrite ^ http://www.domain.com$request_uri? permanent;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Got a little confused with the docs on this page "the first server block with a matching listen directive (or implicit listen 80;)", so assumed the default would be the server with listen 80 specified... Good answer, and I wish I can accept both, but VBart gave a slightly more detailed one, so I had to accept his. –  gingerlime May 15 '12 at 17:57
    
Perfect, thanks. –  toxaq Nov 13 '12 at 4:46

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