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def size(number):
    if number<100:
        return Small()

    if number<1000:
        return Medium()

    return Big()

def size1(number):
    if number<100:
        return Small()
    elif number<1000:
        return Medium()
    else:
        return Big()

Regarding coding style: I often use the former when the following blocks, or the last block is a large chunk of code. It seems to help readability.

I generally use the latter when the various blocks have a common concept running through them (as in the case above). The common indentation helps to communicate their relationship.

Are there any differences between these two worth noting (esp. performance wise)?

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4  
the second example is more readable imo. –  jamylak May 15 '12 at 10:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Style-wise, I find the second example easier on the eye.

In all other respects, there is no difference. The two functions compile to identical bytecodes:

In [3]: dis.dis(size)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (number)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (100)
              6 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
              9 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       19

  3          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (Small)
             15 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             18 RETURN_VALUE        

  5     >>   19 LOAD_FAST                0 (number)
             22 LOAD_CONST               2 (1000)
             25 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
             28 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       38

  6          31 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (Medium)
             34 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             37 RETURN_VALUE        

  8     >>   38 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (Big)
             41 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             44 RETURN_VALUE        

In [4]: dis.dis(size1)
 11           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (number)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (100)
              6 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
              9 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       19

 12          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (Small)
             15 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             18 RETURN_VALUE        

 13     >>   19 LOAD_FAST                0 (number)
             22 LOAD_CONST               2 (1000)
             25 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
             28 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       38

 14          31 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (Medium)
             34 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             37 RETURN_VALUE        

 16     >>   38 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (Big)
             41 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             44 RETURN_VALUE        
             45 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             48 RETURN_VALUE        

(To be 100% accurate, the second version has an implicit return None at the end. However, since this code is not reachable, it won't affect performance.)

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You can only know about the performance for a specific case by benchmarking/timing it (or as @aix shows, looking at the translated code, assuming the code segment is sufficiently small).

Having said that, I think the semantics of the 2nd example are clearer since the language construct shows that the options are mutually exclusive.

In general, given the same functionality, an if/elif/else clause should be more efficient than a series of if-statement where multiple if statements may be executed/evaluated in sequence even if a previous if has been found to be true. In this specific code example this is not the case since there is a return executed as soon as the appropriate body of the if statement is executed.

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