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Is there any way I cast a class without knowing the actual class directly?

E.g.

if ([editedObject isKindOfClass:[object class]])
{
    object = editedObject;
}

I have this code, I pass an object to the method called 'object'. Let says object is a Person class, but it could also be an Animal class. So I can't do this:

object = (Person *)editedObject;

Because I don't know for sure its that class. So how can I cast the class without directly knowing it?

Thanks.

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Why do you want to cast? (btw it's not possible). –  user529758 May 15 '12 at 11:36
    
The object could derive form several different NSManagedObject subclasses and rather than having to manually handle every single one I was trying to create a method of which I could simply pass the object and from that object get its class. –  Josh Kahane May 15 '12 at 11:38
    
But casting doesn't make the difference because of Objective-C's dynamic style. If you cast the object to (Person *) that won't make it a (Person *) just trick the compiler into believing it is. It won't respond to Person's messages etc... –  user529758 May 15 '12 at 11:42
2  
I don't understand..? isKindOfClass doesn't work for you? –  hooleyhoop May 15 '12 at 11:48
    
You said the object is derived from several different NSManagedObject subclasses, so you'd only call methods that NSManagedObject support right? Why not just check if it's a NSManagedObject and then call the method you want to call? If you want to call multiple methods, they you may want to use respondsToSelector. –  Brandon O'Rourke May 15 '12 at 17:04

1 Answer 1

What you are trying to do doesn't make sense. Different object pointer types is a purely compile-time thing. A cast from one object pointer type to another is purely for syntactic convenience, and does not perform any "operations" at runtime (it does not even check that the object is the type you cast it to).

So if you "don't know" the type at compile-time, then there is no syntactic convenience to take advantage of by casting. So there is completely no point to "casting".

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