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My problem is the same as Why does MySQL autoincrement increase on failed inserts?, but instead of increasing my id field, I would prefer just to rewrite the INSERT query that is causing me trouble. Pretend I have a database with two fields, id and username, where id is a primary key and username is a unique key. I'm essentially looking for syntax that would do INSERT...IF NOT EXISTS. Right now, I do

INSERT INTO `table`(`username`) 
    VALUES ('foo') 
    ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE `id`=`id`

I only have one thread writing to the database, so I don't need any sort of concurrency protection. Suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
why is it such a problem having the auto-increment field updating ? –  ManseUK May 15 '12 at 11:48
    
Because I want to avoid having to use a HUGEINT for the key. –  Andy Shulman May 15 '12 at 11:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should use this:

INSERT INTO tableX (username) 
  SELECT 'foo' AS username
  FROM dual
  WHERE NOT EXISTS
        ( SELECT *
          FROM tableX 
          WHERE username = 'foo'
        ) ;

If you want to include values for more columns:

INSERT INTO tableX (username, dateColumn) 
  SELECT 'foo'                       --- the aliases are not needed             
       , NOW()                       --- actually
  FROM dual
  WHERE NOT EXISTS
        ( SELECT *
          FROM tableX 
          WHERE username = 'foo'
        ) ;                      
share|improve this answer
    
What's FROM dual? EDIT Ignore me. Found it in the manual. Great answer +1 –  eggyal May 15 '12 at 12:23
    
dual is a dummy table with one row exactly (originally in Oracle DBMS, where it had 2 rows, thus the name). It can be used to construct a 1-row table. –  ypercube May 15 '12 at 12:24
    
Why does this work when the manual says "you cannot insert into a table and select from the same table in a subquery"? Is it because one only inserts if nothing was selected? Or does EXISTS avoid actually selecting anything? –  eggyal May 15 '12 at 12:30
    
@eggyal: Where does it say that? (Avctually I'm selecting from 'dual' here, not from the same table but that's anotehr issue). –  ypercube May 15 '12 at 12:31
    
Third bullet - dev.mysql.com/doc/en/insert-select.html; won't the EXISTS subquery lock the table and prevent a write? –  eggyal May 15 '12 at 12:31

I don't think you can prevent the counter from being incremented, for the reasons given in the answers the question to which you've linked.

You have three options:

  1. Live with skipped identifiers; do you really expect to use up 64-bits?

  2. Check for existence of the existing record prior to attempting the INSERT:

    DELIMITER ;;
    
    IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE username = 'foo') THEN
      INSERT INTO `table` (username) VALUES ('foo');
    END IF;;
    
    DELIMITER ;
    

    Or, better yet, use the FROM dual WHERE NOT EXISTS ... form suggested by @ypercube.

  3. Reset the counter after each insert. If performing the INSERT operation within a stored procedure, you could do this using a handler for duplicate key errors:

    DELIMITER ;;
    
    CREATE PROCEDURE TEST(IN uname CHAR(16) CHARSET latin1) BEGIN
      DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR SQLSTATE '23000' BEGIN
        -- WARNING: THIS IS NOT SAFE FOR CONCURRENT CONNECTIONS
        SET @qry = CONCAT(
          'ALTER TABLE `table` AUTO_INCREMENT = ',
          (SELECT MAX(id) FROM `table`)
        );
        PREPARE stmt FROM @qry;
        EXECUTE stmt;
        DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;
        SET @qry = NULL;
      END;
      INSERT INTO `table` (username) VALUES (uname);
    END;;
    DELIMITER ;
    

    Bearing in mind the (valid) concerns @ypercube raised in his comments beneath regarding this strategy, you might instead use:

    SELECT AUTO_INCREMENT - 1
    FROM   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
    WHERE  table_schema = 'db_name' AND table_name = 'table';
    
share|improve this answer
    
No to 4, never use option 4. It's not safe. –  ypercube May 15 '12 at 12:36
    
I tried adding your "ALTER TABLE" in a stored procedure, but MySQL yelled at me. What's wrong here? CREATE DEFINER=`me`@`localhost` PROCEDURE `TEST`(IN `uname` CHAR(16) CHARSET latin1) NOT DETERMINISTIC MODIFIES SQL DATA SQL SECURITY DEFINER INSERT INTO `test` ( `username` ) VALUES ( uname ) ON DUPLICATE KEY (ALTER TABLE `table` AUTO_INCREMENT = (SELECT MAX(id) FROM `table`)); –  Andy Shulman May 15 '12 at 12:36
    
@ypercube: Why is it not safe, given the OP stated he has "only one thread writing to the database, so I don't need any sort of concurrency protection"? –  eggyal May 15 '12 at 12:37
    
@AndyShulman: You can only ON DUPLICATE UPDATE ...; trying to ALTER TABLE in that fashion is a syntax error. You must use separate statements as shown. –  eggyal May 15 '12 at 12:39
    
I guess I misunderstood your comment about "handler for duplicate key errors", then. Could you elaborate? –  Andy Shulman May 15 '12 at 12:40

use INSERT IGNORE INTO table. Check the below post

http://bogdan.org.ua/2007/10/18/mysql-insert-if-not-exists-syntax.html

You can do it like:

INSERT INTO `table`(`username`) 
VALUES ('foo')      
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE `username`= 'foo' 

OR

INSERT IGNORE INTO `table`
SET `username` = 'foo'
share|improve this answer
1  
No. This still autoincrements id, even when no row is inserted. –  Andy Shulman May 15 '12 at 11:54
    
Sorry, I don't think so. If a duplicate key exist then it will skip it; if not then a new row will be inserted and obhiously id will be incremented. are you looking for a different behavior? –  Rahul May 15 '12 at 12:00
1  
It does. I tested it. I ran INSERT IGNORE INTO `test`(`username`) VALUES ('testuser') 5 times, and then checked what the next auto-increment value was. –  Andy Shulman May 15 '12 at 12:02
    
You mean, even though it ignores and doesn't insert but still id gets autoincremented? that's strange ... haven't tested though. Would suggest you to post the same question in mysql forum as well. –  Rahul May 15 '12 at 12:05
    
Yup. Inserted with id of 1, but on successful insert of a different username the next id is 6. –  Andy Shulman May 15 '12 at 12:07

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