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How can I achieve a cross join in R ? I know that "merge" can do inner join, outer join. But I do not know how to achieve a cross join in R.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Is it just all=TRUE?

x<-data.frame(id1=c("a","b","c"),vals1=1:3)
y<-data.frame(id2=c("d","e","f"),vals2=4:6)
merge(x,y,all=TRUE)

From documentation of merge:

If by or both by.x and by.y are of length 0 (a length zero vector or NULL), the result, r, is the Cartesian product of x and y, i.e., dim(r) = c(nrow(x)*nrow(y), ncol(x) + ncol(y)).

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If speed is an issue, I suggest checking out the excellent data.table package. In the example at the end it's ~90x faster than merge.

You didn't provide example data. If you just want to get all combinations of two (or more individual) columns, you can use CJ (cross join):

library(data.table)
CJ(x=1:2,y=letters[1:3])
#   x y
#1: 1 a
#2: 1 b
#3: 1 c
#4: 2 a
#5: 2 b
#6: 2 c

If you want to do a cross join on two tables, I haven't found a way to use CJ(). But you can still use data.table:

x2<-data.table(id1=letters[1:3],vals1=1:3)
y2<-data.table(id2=letters[4:7],vals2=4:7)

res<-setkey(x2[,c(k=1,.SD)],k)[y2[,c(k=1,.SD)],allow.cartesian=TRUE][,k:=NULL]
res
#    id1 vals1 id2 vals2
# 1:   a     1   d     4
# 2:   b     2   d     4
# 3:   c     3   d     4
# 4:   a     1   e     5
# 5:   b     2   e     5
# 6:   c     3   e     5
# 7:   a     1   f     6
# 8:   b     2   f     6
# 9:   c     3   f     6
#10:   a     1   g     7
#11:   b     2   g     7
#12:   c     3   g     7

Explanation of the res line:

  • Basically you add a dummy column (k in this example) to one table and set it as the key (setkey(tablename,keycolumns)), add the dummy column to the other table, and then join them.
  • The data.table structure uses column positions and not names in the join, so you have to put the dummy column at the beginning. The c(k=1,.SD) part is one way that I have found to add columns at the beginning (the default is to add them to the end).
  • A standard data.table join has a format of X[Y]. The X in this case is setkey(x2[,c(k=1,.SD)],k), and the Y is y2[,c(k=1,.SD)].
  • allow.cartesian=TRUE tells data.table to ignore the duplicate key values, and perform a cartesian join (prior versions didn't require this)
  • The [,k:=NULL] at the end just removes the dummy key from the result.

You can also turn this into a function, so it's cleaner to use:

# Version 1; easier to write:
CJ.table.1 <- function(X,Y)
  setkey(X[,c(k=1,.SD)],k)[Y[,c(k=1,.SD)],allow.cartesian=TRUE][,k:=NULL]

CJ.table.1(x2,y2)
#    id1 vals1 id2 vals2
# 1:   a     1   d     4
# 2:   b     2   d     4
# 3:   c     3   d     4
# 4:   a     1   e     5
# 5:   b     2   e     5
# 6:   c     3   e     5
# 7:   a     1   f     6
# 8:   b     2   f     6
# 9:   c     3   f     6
#10:   a     1   g     7
#11:   b     2   g     7
#12:   c     3   g     7

# Version 2; faster but messier:
CJ.table.2 <- function(X,Y) {
  eval(parse(text=paste0("setkey(X[,c(k=1,.SD)],k)[Y[,c(k=1,.SD)],list(",paste0(unique(c(names(X),names(Y))),collapse=","),")][,k:=NULL]")))
}

Here are some speed benchmarks:

# Create a bigger (but still very small) example:
n<-1e3
x3<-data.table(id1=1L:n,vals1=sample(letters,n,replace=T))
y3<-data.table(id2=1L:n,vals2=sample(LETTERS,n,replace=T))

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(merge=merge.data.frame(x3,y3,all=TRUE),
               CJ.table.1=CJ.table.1(x3,y3),
               CJ.table.2=CJ.table.2(x3,y3),
               times=3, unit="s")
#Unit: seconds
#       expr        min         lq     median         uq        max neval
#      merge 4.03710225 4.23233688 4.42757152 5.57854711 6.72952271     3
# CJ.table.1 0.06227603 0.06264222 0.06300842 0.06701880 0.07102917     3
# CJ.table.2 0.04740142 0.04812997 0.04885853 0.05433146 0.05980440     3

Note that these data.table methods are much faster than the merge method suggested by @danas.zuokas. The two tables with 1,000 rows in this example result in a cross-joined table with 1 million rows. So even if your original tables are small, the result can get big quickly and speed becomes important.

Lastly, recent versions of data.table require you to add the allow.cartesian=TRUE (as in CJ.table.1) or specify the names of the columns that should be returned (CJ.table.2). The second method (CJ.table.2) seems to be faster, but requires some more complicated code if you want to automatically specify all the column names. And it may not work with duplicate column names. (Feel free to suggest a simpler version of CJ.table.2)

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Not sure if this is due to subsequent package changes, but to get this working I had to amend the function slightly to CJ.table<-function(X,Y) setkey(X[,c(k=1,.SD)],k)[Y[,c(k=1,.SD)],allow.cartesian=TRUE][,k:=NULL] –  Steph Locke Feb 6 at 9:06
    
You're correct @StephLocke, the data.table behavior has changed since my original answer. I've updated it and added some timings. Thanks. –  dnlbrky Feb 7 at 15:04

I don't know of a built-in way to do it with data.frame's but it isn't hard to make.

@danas showed there is an easy built-in way, but I'll leave my answer here in case it is useful for other purposes.

cross.join <- function(a, b) {
    idx <- expand.grid(seq(length=nrow(a)), seq(length=nrow(b)))
    cbind(a[idx[,1],], b[idx[,2],])
}

and showing that it works with some built-in data sets:

> tmp <- cross.join(mtcars, iris)
> dim(mtcars)
[1] 32 11
> dim(iris)
[1] 150   5
> dim(tmp)
[1] 4800   16
> str(tmp)
'data.frame':   4800 obs. of  16 variables:
 $ mpg         : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 ...
 $ cyl         : num  6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 ...
 $ disp        : num  160 160 108 258 360 ...
 $ hp          : num  110 110 93 110 175 105 245 62 95 123 ...
 $ drat        : num  3.9 3.9 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 ...
 $ wt          : num  2.62 2.88 2.32 3.21 3.44 ...
 $ qsec        : num  16.5 17 18.6 19.4 17 ...
 $ vs          : num  0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 ...
 $ am          : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ gear        : num  4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 ...
 $ carb        : num  4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 ...
 $ Sepal.Length: num  5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 ...
 $ Sepal.Width : num  3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 ...
 $ Petal.Length: num  1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 ...
 $ Petal.Width : num  0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 ...
 $ Species     : Factor w/ 3 levels "setosa","versicolor",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
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