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I have JavaScript that is doing activity periodically. When the user is not looking at the site (i.e., the window or tab does not have focus), it'd be nice to not run.

Is there a way to do this using JavaScript?

My reference point: GMail Chat plays a sound if the window you're using isn't active.

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4  
For those who are not satisfied with the answers below, check out the requestAnimationFrame API, or use the modern feature that the frequency of setTimeout/setInterval is reduced when the window is not visible (1 sec in Chrome, for example). –  Rob W Feb 10 '13 at 17:05
1  
document.body.onblur=function(e){console.log('lama');} worked for non focused elements. –  WhyMe Jun 5 '13 at 1:03
1  
See this answer for a cross-browser compatible solution that uses the W3C Page Visibility API, falling back to blur/focus in browsers that don’t support it. –  Mathias Bynens Dec 3 '13 at 11:45

12 Answers 12

up vote 274 down vote accepted

Since originally writing this answer, a new specification has reached recommendation status thanks to the W3C. The Page Visibility API now allows us to more accurately detect when a page is hidden to the user.

Current browser support:

  • Chrome 13+
  • Internet Explorer 10+
  • Firefox 10+
  • Opera 12.10+ [read notes]

The following code makes use of the API, falling back to the less reliable blur/focus method in incompatible browsers.

(function() {
    var hidden = "hidden";

    // Standards:
    if (hidden in document)
        document.addEventListener("visibilitychange", onchange);
    else if ((hidden = "mozHidden") in document)
        document.addEventListener("mozvisibilitychange", onchange);
    else if ((hidden = "webkitHidden") in document)
        document.addEventListener("webkitvisibilitychange", onchange);
    else if ((hidden = "msHidden") in document)
        document.addEventListener("msvisibilitychange", onchange);
    // IE 9 and lower:
    else if ('onfocusin' in document)
        document.onfocusin = document.onfocusout = onchange;
    // All others:
    else
        window.onpageshow = window.onpagehide 
            = window.onfocus = window.onblur = onchange;

    function onchange (evt) {
        var v = 'visible', h = 'hidden',
            evtMap = { 
                focus:v, focusin:v, pageshow:v, blur:h, focusout:h, pagehide:h 
            };

        evt = evt || window.event;
        if (evt.type in evtMap)
            document.body.className = evtMap[evt.type];
        else        
            document.body.className = this[hidden] ? "hidden" : "visible";
    }
    // set the initial state
    onchange({type:(document.visibilityState == "visible") ? "focus" : "blur"})        
})();

onfocusin and onfocusout are required for IE 9 and lower, while all others make use of onfocus and onblur, except for iOS, which uses onpageshow and onpagehide.

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1  
Excellent, that's just what I was looking for but apparently wasn't using the right search terms to find. I tried (using jQuery) $(window).bind('blur', function() { alert("i lost focus") }) which didn't work, but I will go back try again using the link here. –  Luke Francl Jun 29 '09 at 20:52
1  
@bellpeace: IE should propagate focusin and focusout from the iframe to the upper window. For newer browsers, you'd just have to handle the focus and blur events on each iframe's window object. You should use the updated code I just added which will at least cover those cases in newer browsers. –  Andy E May 30 '12 at 23:13
5  
Beware of minifiers removing that /*@cc_on!@*/ comment. –  SalmanPK Jul 11 '12 at 4:26
1  
Aren't you declaring hidden twice? –  Majid Fouladpour Aug 7 '12 at 23:23
1  
@JulienKronegg: that's why my answer specifically mentions the Page Visibility API which entered working draft status after I originally wrote my answer. The focus/blur methods provide limited functionality for older browsers. Binding to other events, as in your answer, doesn't cover a great deal more than this and is more at risk of behavioural differences (like IE not firing mouseout when a window pops up beneath the cursor). I would suggest a more appropriate action would be to display a message or icon indicating to the user that updates may be less frequent due to page inactivity. –  Andy E Sep 7 '12 at 16:12

I would use jQuery because then all you have to do is this:

$(window).blur(function(){
  //your code here
});
$(window).focus(function(){
  //your code
});

Or at least it worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, I used this to control a background process and it worked nicely. –  Travis J Oct 2 '12 at 21:31
2  
Does this in fact work? –  Armin Cifuentes Apr 18 '13 at 18:04
1  
for me this call twice in iframe –  msangel Jun 29 '13 at 13:59
    
In Firefox, if you click inside firebug console (on the same page), the window will loose focus, which is right, but depending on what your intention might not be what you need. –  Majid Fouladpour Nov 27 '13 at 7:31
3  
This no longer works for current versions of modern browsers, see the approved answer (Page Visibility API) –  Jon z Feb 25 at 17:10

The W3C Page Visibility API is what you are looking for (i.e. determine if the user can see the page). But it is currently supported only under the following browsers:

  • Firefox 10
  • MSIE 10
  • Chrome 13

Alternate methods will not work, e.g. :

  • Using focus/blur based methods gives you a lot of false positive. For example, if the user displays a smaller window on top of the browser window, the browser window will loose the focus (onblur raised) but the user is still able to see it (so it still need to be refreshed). See also http://javascript.info/tutorial/focus
  • Relying on user activity (mouse move, clicks, key typed) gives you a lot of false positive too. Think about the same case as above, or a user watching a video.

I use a combination of the focus/blur and user activity methods in order to reduce the false positive rate. When the document loose the focus, the user activity (such as mouse move) on the document is monitored in order to determine if the window is visible or not. The page visibility probability is inversely proportional to the time of the last user activity on the page: if the user makes no activity on the document for a long time, the page is most probably not visible. The code below mimics the W3C Page Visibility API: it behaves the same way but has a small false positive rate. It has the advantage to be multibrowser (tested on Firefox 5, Firefox 10, MSIE 9, MSIE 7, Safari 5, Chrome 9).


    <div id="x"></div>

    <script>
    /**
    Registers the handler to the event for the given object.
    @param obj the object which will raise the event
    @param evType the event type: click, keypress, mouseover, ...
    @param fn the event handler function
    @param isCapturing set the event mode (true = capturing event, false = bubbling event)
    @return true if the event handler has been attached correctly
    */
    function addEvent(obj, evType, fn, isCapturing){
      if (isCapturing==null) isCapturing=false; 
      if (obj.addEventListener){
        // Firefox
        obj.addEventListener(evType, fn, isCapturing);
        return true;
      } else if (obj.attachEvent){
        // MSIE
        var r = obj.attachEvent('on'+evType, fn);
        return r;
      } else {
        return false;
      }
    }

    // register to the potential page visibility change
    addEvent(document, "potentialvisilitychange", function(event) {
      document.getElementById("x").innerHTML+="potentialVisilityChange: potentialHidden="+document.potentialHidden+", document.potentiallyHiddenSince="+document.potentiallyHiddenSince+" s
"; }); // register to the W3C Page Visibility API var hidden=null; var visibilityChange=null; if (typeof document.mozHidden !== "undefined") { hidden="mozHidden"; visibilityChange="mozvisibilitychange"; } else if (typeof document.msHidden !== "undefined") { hidden="msHidden"; visibilityChange="msvisibilitychange"; } else if (typeof document.webkitHidden!=="undefined") { hidden="webkitHidden"; visibilityChange="webkitvisibilitychange"; } else if (typeof document.hidden !=="hidden") { hidden="hidden"; visibilityChange="visibilitychange"; } if (hidden!=null && visibilityChange!=null) { addEvent(document, visibilityChange, function(event) { document.getElementById("x").innerHTML+=visibilityChange+": "+hidden+"="+document[hidden]+"
"; }); } var potentialPageVisibility = { pageVisibilityChangeThreshold:3*3600, // in seconds init:function() { function setAsNotHidden() { var dispatchEventRequired=document.potentialHidden; document.potentialHidden=false; document.potentiallyHiddenSince=0; if (dispatchEventRequired) dispatchPageVisibilityChangeEvent(); } function initPotentiallyHiddenDetection() { if (!hasFocusLocal) { // the window does not has the focus => check for user activity in the window lastActionDate=new Date(); if (timeoutHandler!=null) { clearTimeout(timeoutHandler); } timeoutHandler = setTimeout(checkPageVisibility, potentialPageVisibility.pageVisibilityChangeThreshold*1000+100); // +100 ms to avoid rounding issues under Firefox } } function dispatchPageVisibilityChangeEvent() { unifiedVisilityChangeEventDispatchAllowed=false; var evt = document.createEvent("Event"); evt.initEvent("potentialvisilitychange", true, true); document.dispatchEvent(evt); } function checkPageVisibility() { var potentialHiddenDuration=(hasFocusLocal || lastActionDate==null?0:Math.floor((new Date().getTime()-lastActionDate.getTime())/1000)); document.potentiallyHiddenSince=potentialHiddenDuration; if (potentialHiddenDuration>=potentialPageVisibility.pageVisibilityChangeThreshold && !document.potentialHidden) { // page visibility change threshold raiched => raise the even document.potentialHidden=true; dispatchPageVisibilityChangeEvent(); } } var lastActionDate=null; var hasFocusLocal=true; var hasMouseOver=true; document.potentialHidden=false; document.potentiallyHiddenSince=0; var timeoutHandler = null; addEvent(document, "pageshow", function(event) { document.getElementById("x").innerHTML+="pageshow/doc:
"; }); addEvent(document, "pagehide", function(event) { document.getElementById("x").innerHTML+="pagehide/doc:
"; }); addEvent(window, "pageshow", function(event) { document.getElementById("x").innerHTML+="pageshow/win:
"; // raised when the page first shows }); addEvent(window, "pagehide", function(event) { document.getElementById("x").innerHTML+="pagehide/win:
"; // not raised }); addEvent(document, "mousemove", function(event) { lastActionDate=new Date(); }); addEvent(document, "mouseover", function(event) { hasMouseOver=true; setAsNotHidden(); }); addEvent(document, "mouseout", function(event) { hasMouseOver=false; initPotentiallyHiddenDetection(); }); addEvent(window, "blur", function(event) { hasFocusLocal=false; initPotentiallyHiddenDetection(); }); addEvent(window, "focus", function(event) { hasFocusLocal=true; setAsNotHidden(); }); setAsNotHidden(); } } potentialPageVisibility.pageVisibilityChangeThreshold=4; // for testing potentialPageVisibility.init(); </script>

Since there is currently no working cross-browser solution without false positive, you should better think twice about disabling periodical activity on your web site.

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The top answer rocks and is what has led to my answer, so even if you find my answer great, maybe plus one the inspiration?

I'm simply throwing my 2cents in here because I found many other answers that half worked but should be avoided. I also rebuilt the top answer into a custom jQuery Plugin with ease of use and a working Fiddle to show just how easy it is!

First of all, one of the common answers I've seen here and in dups of this question is the jQuery $(window).focus/blur methods. 2 problems persist with this method.

The first problem is an issue of "duplicate" calls. This is easy enough to work around if you want to use this method. Simply create some sort of identifier to check each time your function is called and then go to town. For Example:

$(window).on("blur focus", function(e) {
    var prevType = $(this).data("prevType"); // getting identifier to check by
    if (prevType != e.type) {   //  reduce double fire issues by checking identifier
        switch (e.type) {
            case "blur":
                // do work
                break;
            case "focus":
                // do work
                break;
        }
    }
    $(this).data("prevType", e.type); // reset identifier
})

As simple as this seems, it returns a new problem. For jQuery, window.focus means when the user has actually "selected" that window. In other words, if the user selects another application (like calculator or something) or even clicks in the browser console, the window "looses focus". Thus this method may still be undesirable.

Thus we're back to the method provided by the top answer. Great answer! It accounts for these issues by becoming directly event driven. This is what led me to be able to make a very easy to use jQuery plugin that will be much more accurate than $(window).blur.

jsFiddle/jQPlug-in

Use:

$.winFocus(function(event, isVisible) {
    console.log("Combo\t\t", event, isVisible);
});

//  OR *new option*

$.winFocus(function(event, isVisible) {
    console.log("Combo\t\t", event, isVisible);
}, false);

//  OR

$.winFocus({
    blur: function(event) {
        console.log("Blur\t\t", event);
    },
    focus: function(event) {
        console.log("Focus\t\t", event);
    }
});

//  OR

$.winFocus(function(event) {
    console.log("Blur\t\t", event);
},
function(event) {
    console.log("Focus\t\t", event);
});

Plugin has been updated!
Now has an option "initRun". This is default to true and will run you're change function upon initialization. Simply add a false boolean to the call like $.winFocus(func..., false) to take it back a step and not have it run till the first time the window is focused or blurred (most likly blurred) after the initial call.

Also, I believe I've fixed all cross-browser issues. Hit me up in comments if you find a problem!

share|improve this answer
    
Hi SpY, I tried your fiddle on chromium. It works if I change tabs, but it doesn't if I change windows (ALT+tab). Should it? –  Tony Lâmpada Sep 16 '13 at 21:14
1  
@TonyLâmpada Ah, the alt+tab simply changes "Windows windows" and not "Browser windows". Yes, it's working as it should. For basic change on alt+tab, you can use .blur, but that is not the intent of this plugin. Take this: You have a banking page open that will hide info on blur. U alt+tab to your calculator to double check some stuff, but alas! It's hidden! Oh no! <-- see the point? The idea is to ONLY show Browser window state change, and not Window window. Understand? –  SpYk3HH Sep 17 '13 at 15:51
    
For me it says 'TypeError: a is undefined' on the jsfiddle page when I uncomment the 'Alternate ways to use this plugin' part. –  tomsv Nov 25 '13 at 11:39
    
@dontomaso : Seems to work fine for me; Alt 1, Alt 2. Can you tell me what browser you used? Did you have console open to start with (as I hear Older IE has some trouble with console.log if the console is not already open)? What actions did you preform? –  SpYk3HH Nov 25 '13 at 15:12
    
How about creating a GitHub repo on this? –  Benjamin Dec 1 '13 at 23:19

In HTML 5 you could also use:

  • onpageshow: Script to be run when the window becomes visible
  • onpagehide: Script to be run when the window is hidden

See:

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16  
Just a quick sidenote here: w3schools are pretty bad, please see w3fools.com about that. We have way better references - I have even blacklisted that site for my Google searches. –  Scorchio Mar 6 '12 at 10:10
1  
The link w3schools.com/html5/html5_ref_eventattributes.asp is broken! (2013-03-14) –  ed1nh0 Mar 14 '13 at 14:16
    
@Scorchio - so go ahead, edit my post and link to a more preferred ref –  roberkules Mar 14 '13 at 16:25
    
I think this is related to the BFCache: when the user clicks Back or Forward -- it is not related to the page being at the top of computer desktop. –  動靜能量 Jul 11 '13 at 7:07

A slightly more complicated way would be to use setInterval() to check mouse position and compare to last check. If the mouse hasn't moved in a set amount of time, the user is probably idle.

This has the added advantage of telling if the user is idle, instead of just checking if the window is not active.

As many people have pointed out, this is not always a good way to check whether the user or browser window is idle, as the user might not even be using the mouse or is watching a video, or similar. I am just suggesting one possible way to check for idle-ness.

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19  
Unless the user doesn't have a mouse. –  grawity Jun 29 '09 at 19:36
    
related: Going Commando - codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000825.html –  Annan Jul 31 '09 at 10:49
    
@Annan: It's codinghorror.com/blog/2007/03/… now. –  chiborg Jun 16 '11 at 14:34
    
This also doesn't play dice if the user is watching a video –  jamiew Nov 29 '11 at 17:32
    
you could use onkeypress or other similar events to reset the timer and solve the non-mouse issue. Of course it still wouldn't work for users actively looking at the page to watch a video, study an image, etc. –  joshuahedlund Jan 10 '12 at 21:34

u can use :

(function () {

    var requiredResolution = 10; // ms
    var checkInterval = 1000; // ms
    var tolerance = 20; // percent


    var counter = 0;
    var expected = checkInterval / requiredResolution;
    //console.log('expected:', expected);

    window.setInterval(function () {
        counter++;
    }, requiredResolution);

    window.setInterval(function () {
        var deviation = 100 * Math.abs(1 - counter / expected);
        // console.log('is:', counter, '(off by', deviation , '%)');
        if (deviation > tolerance) {
            console.warn('Timer resolution not sufficient!');
        }
        counter = 0;
    }, checkInterval);

})();
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This is really tricky. There seems to be no solution given the following requirements.

  • The page includes iframes that you have no control over
  • You want to track visibility state change regardless of the change being triggered by a TAB change (ctrl+tab) or a window change (alt+tab)

This happens because:

  • The page Visibility API can reliably tell you of a tab change (even with iframes), but it can't tell you when the user changes windows.
  • Listening to window blur/focus events can detect alt+tabs and ctrl+tabs, as long as the iframe doesn't have focus.

Given these restrictions, it is possible to implement a solution that combines - The page Visibility API - window blur/focus - document.activeElement

That is able to:

  • 1) ctrl+tab when parent page has focus: YES
  • 2) ctrl+tab when iframe has focus: YES
  • 3) alt+tab when parent page has focus: YES
  • 4) alt+tab when iframe has focus: NO <-- bummer

When the iframe has focus, your blur/focus events don't get invoked at all, and the page Visibility API won't trigger on alt+tab.

I built upon @AndyE's solution and implemented this (almost good) solution here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2683925/estante-components/visibility_test1.html (sorry, I had some trouble with JSFiddle).

This is also available on Github: https://github.com/qmagico/estante-components

This works on chrome/chromium. It kind works on firefox, except that it doesn't load the iframe contents (any idea why?)

Anyway, to resolve the last problem (4), the only way you can do that is to listen for blur/focus events on the iframe. If you have some control over the iframes, you can use the postMessage API to do that.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2683925/estante-components/visibility_test2.html

I still haven't tested this with enough browsers. If you can find more info about where this doesn't work, please let me know in the comments below.

share|improve this answer
    
In my tests it also worked on IE9, IE10 and Chrome on Android. –  Tony Lâmpada Sep 17 '13 at 18:31
    
Does NOT work at all in the IPad. :-( –  Tony Lâmpada Sep 17 '13 at 18:32
    
It seems IPAD needs a completely different solution - stackoverflow.com/questions/4940657/… –  Tony Lâmpada Sep 17 '13 at 18:50
var visibilityChange = (function (window) {
    var inView = false;
    return function (fn) {
        window.onfocus = window.onblur = window.onpageshow = window.onpagehide = function (e) {
            if ({focus:1, pageshow:1}[e.type]) {
                if (inView) return;
                fn("visible");
                inView = true;
            } else if (inView) {
                fn("hidden");
                inView = false;
            }
        };
    };
}(this));

visibilityChange(function (state) {
    console.log(state);
});

http://jsfiddle.net/ARTsinn/JTxQY/

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There is a neat library available on GitHub:

https://github.com/serkanyersen/ifvisible.js

Example:

// If page is visible right now
if( ifvisible.now() ){
  // Display pop-up
  openPopUp();
}

I've tested version 1.0.1 on all browsers I have and can confirm that it works with:

  • IE9, IE10
  • FF 26.0
  • Chrome 34.0

... and probably all newer versions.

Doesn't fully work with:

  • IE8 - always indicate that tab/window is currently active (.now() always returns true for me)
share|improve this answer

This is an adaptation of the answer from Andy E.

This will do a task e.g. refresh the page every 30 seconds, but only if the page is visible and focused.

If visibility can't be detected, then only focus will be used.

If the user focuses the page, then it will update immediately

The page won't update again until 30 seconds after any ajax call

var windowFocused = true;
var timeOut2 = null;

$(function(){
  $.ajaxSetup ({
    cache: false
  });
  $("#content").ajaxComplete(function(event,request, settings){
       set_refresh_page(); // ajax call has just been made, so page doesn't need updating again for 30 seconds
   });
  // check visibility and focus of window, so as not to keep updating unnecessarily
  (function() {
      var hidden, change, vis = {
              hidden: "visibilitychange",
              mozHidden: "mozvisibilitychange",
              webkitHidden: "webkitvisibilitychange",
              msHidden: "msvisibilitychange",
              oHidden: "ovisibilitychange" /* not currently supported */
          };
      for (hidden in vis) {
          if (vis.hasOwnProperty(hidden) && hidden in document) {
              change = vis[hidden];
              break;
          }
      }
      document.body.className="visible";
      if (change){     // this will check the tab visibility instead of window focus
          document.addEventListener(change, onchange,false);
      }

      if(navigator.appName == "Microsoft Internet Explorer")
         window.onfocus = document.onfocusin = document.onfocusout = onchangeFocus
      else
         window.onfocus = window.onblur = onchangeFocus;

      function onchangeFocus(evt){
        evt = evt || window.event;
        if (evt.type == "focus" || evt.type == "focusin"){
          windowFocused=true; 
        }
        else if (evt.type == "blur" || evt.type == "focusout"){
          windowFocused=false;
        }
        if (evt.type == "focus"){
          update_page();  // only update using window.onfocus, because document.onfocusin can trigger on every click
        }

      }

      function onchange () {
        document.body.className = this[hidden] ? "hidden" : "visible";
        update_page();
      }

      function update_page(){
        if(windowFocused&&(document.body.className=="visible")){
          set_refresh_page(1000);
        }
      }


  })();
  set_refresh_page();
})

function get_date_time_string(){
  var d = new Date();
  var dT = [];
  dT.push(d.getDate());
  dT.push(d.getMonth())
  dT.push(d.getFullYear());
  dT.push(d.getHours());
  dT.push(d.getMinutes());
  dT.push(d.getSeconds());
  dT.push(d.getMilliseconds());
  return dT.join('_');
}

function do_refresh_page(){

// do tasks here

// e.g. some ajax call to update part of the page.

// (date time parameter will probably force the server not to cache)

//      $.ajax({
//        type: "POST",
//        url: "someUrl.php",
//        data: "t=" + get_date_time_string()+"&task=update",
//        success: function(html){
//          $('#content').html(html);
//        }
//      });

}

function set_refresh_page(interval){
  interval = typeof interval !== 'undefined' ? interval : 30000; // default time = 30 seconds
  if(timeOut2 != null) clearTimeout(timeOut2);
  timeOut2 = setTimeout(function(){
    if((document.body.className=="visible")&&windowFocused){
      do_refresh_page();
    }
    set_refresh_page();
  }, interval);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Relying on focus/blur methods do not work (it gives you a lot of false positive), see stackoverflow.com/a/9502074/698168 –  Julien Kronegg Sep 7 '12 at 14:43

I create a Comet Chat for my app, and when i receive a message from another user i use

if(new_mensajes){
    if(!document.hasFocus()){
        audio.play();
        document.title="Have new messages";
    }
    else{
        audio.stop();
        document.title="Application Name";
    } 
}
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