Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Looking at some c# code from open and closed source project i see that private, and sometimes public methods are designed to recive parameters and not directly access the instance variable to extract the parameter they need

  class A
  {
    private B b;

    public void Methode1()
    {            
        Methode2(b.SomeProperty);
    }                

    private void Methode2(string param)
    {         
    }
  }

Is this considered as a good practice, or it's just a programming way?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, its normal. Consider also moving Methode2 to class B (Tell, don't ask principle):

 class A
  {
    private B b;

    public void Methode1()
    {            
        b.Methode2();
    }
  }

What is bad - passing whole object as parameter for method, when you need only value of it's property (don't pass to method more, than it needs for execution):

 class A
  {
    private B b;

    public void Methode1()
    {            
        Methode2(b);
    }                

    private void Methode2(B b)
    {
        // use b.SomeProperty         
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
isn't confusing whene passing the whole parametre whene just one or two parametres are needed? – anouar.bagari May 15 '12 at 12:24
    
@anouar204 sorry, didn't get the question – Sergey Berezovskiy May 15 '12 at 12:26
    
if the methode need only a small set of parameters from the class B isn't confusing to pass the whole instance? – anouar.bagari May 15 '12 at 12:29
    
@anouar204 if those parameters are related, then maybe its time to group them into some entity and pass to method (e.g. grouping zip, city and street to address entity). If parameters not related, but all belong to one object, then it's OK to pass whole object instead of several parameters (but if you need to pull many data from some object to execute operation, then consider moving method to object which already contains all data) – Sergey Berezovskiy May 15 '12 at 12:34
    
Moving Methode2 to B works, and is a way to go imo, but only if there is nothing else in Methode2 that depends on A. Otoh, if there are lots of places where you have to call Methode2(b.SomeProperty), this is kind of at odds with DRY. – driushkin May 15 '12 at 12:39

There is no a "good practice" in regard of this subject.

This is a kind of method "overloading" (can not find exact term to define this), maintaining some of them private. That is.

In this concrete example could be that Methode2(string param) is also called from some other part of the class with a different from b.SomeProperty parameter.

So to avoid double code, the developer entroduced a new Methode2(..) method.

share|improve this answer
1  
The code shown isn't using overloading at all. The method names are different. – Jon Skeet May 15 '12 at 12:15
    
@JonSkeet: correct! Will fix the text... – Tigran May 15 '12 at 12:19
    
can we consider the readability of the code a sufficient argument to use parameters instead of the instance variable? – anouar.bagari May 15 '12 at 12:22
    
@anouar204: don't see any readability benefits, if not you esplcitly specify what this method uses, but what if that method uses 10 members of the class ? Don't think adding 10 parameters to the method is readable. So I would say no, there is no any readability benefits, imo. – Tigran May 15 '12 at 12:24
    
@Tigran i agree with you but what if the methode need only 1 or 2 parameters? – anouar.bagari May 15 '12 at 12:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.