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I'm currently cutting my teeth on nHibernate and had a question with regards to dynamically accessing properties in my persistent objects.

I have the following class in my Domain:

public class Locations {
    public virtual string CountryCode;
    public virtual string CountryName;
}

Now, assuming I have a reference to a Locations object, is there any way for me to do something like this?

Locations myCountry = new LocationsRepository().GetByCountryCode("US");
myCountry.Set("CountryName", "U.S.A.");

instead of having to do :

myCountry.CountryName = "U.S.A."

Without reflection?

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5 Answers 5

If your goal of avoiding reflection is to increase performance, then a simple solution is to hard-code the functionality with all the properties like this:

public class Locations {
    public virtual string CountryCode;
    public virtual string CountryName;

    public void Set(string propertyName, string value) {
        if (propertyName == "CountryCode") this.CountryCode = value;
        else if (propertyName == "CountryName") this.CountryName = value;
        else throw new ArgumentException("Unrecognized property '" + propertyName + "'");
    }
}

You could easily make this approach tenable by using T4 templates to generate the Set methods for all of your domain classes programmatically. In fact, we do similar kinds of things in our own code-base, using T4 templates to generate adapters and serializers to avoid the cost of reflection at run-time while gaining the flexibility of reflection for code-generation at compile-time.

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I know you said "without reflection", but reflection's not all bad (certainly not as slow as people make it out to be), so it's worth a mention of the reflection solution in here:

using System.Reflection;

typeof(Locations).GetProperty("CountryName").SetValue(myCountry, "U.S.A.", null);

poof, done.

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You are looking for something that behaves like a normal object with properties and like a dictionary at the same time. If you're on .NET4 you may have a look at ExpandoObject which is exactly that.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I hate answering my own questions on StackOverflow, and I appreciate everyone's responses, but none of them really did it for me. After some research I found that the latest versions of NHibernate offer dynamic models.

While handy, their experimental nature made me a little leery of using them in production, so I did some more research. I discovered that SE's very own Marc Gravell made a successor to his HyperDescriptor library, called Fastmember. It takes advantage of the speed gains that the DLR offers and mashes it together with the simpler syntax of reflection. I implemented FastMember access as simple GetValue and SetValue methods in my base entity class and I was in business.

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+1 You might get more votes if you show your code with Fastmember. The library is still very new. It might help show why your answer IS actually the best answer, and give people a reason to try Fastmember out. –  jsmith Jul 24 '12 at 16:44

Without reflection, this can be an idea:

public class Locations 
{
  private Dictionary<string, object> _values;
  public Locations() 
  {
    _values = new Dictionary<string, object>();
  }
  public void Set(string propertyName, object value)
  {
     if(!_values.ContainsKey(propertyName))
        _values.Add(propertyName, value);
     else
        _values[propertyName] = value;
  }
  public object Get(string propertyName)
  {
     return _values.ContainsKey(propertyName) ? _values[propertyName] : null;
  }

  public string CountryCode
  {
     get{ return Get("CountryCode"); }
     set{ Set("CountryCode", value); }
  }
}

In this way you are able to access the property without reflection and change them with a single method. I have not tested this code but I hope this is what you mean by "do not have direct access to the property."

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