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Let's say I have a class like this:

class Test(object):
    prop = property(lambda self: "property")

The descriptor takes priority whenever I try to access Test().prop. So that will return 'property'. If I want to access the object's instance storage, I can do:

x = Test()
x.__dict__["prop"] = 12
print(x.__dict__["prop"])

However if I change my class to:

class Test(object):
    __slots__ = ("prop",)
    prop = property(lambda self: "property")

How do I do the same, and access the internal storage of x, to write 12 and read it back, since x.__dict__ no longer exist?

I am fairly new with Python, but I understand the Python philosophy is to give complete control, so why is an implementation detail preventing me from doing that?

Isn't Python missing a built-in function that could read from an instance internal storage, something like:

instance_vars(x)["prop"] = 12
print(instance_vars(x)["prop"])

which would work like vars, except it also works with __slots__, and with built-in types that don't have a __dict__?

share|improve this question
2  
There's complete control, and there's things that are very silly to do. What do you need this for? –  Cat Plus Plus May 15 '12 at 12:40
    
What are you doing mucking about with __slots__ anyway? There's almost never a need to do that. –  Daniel Roseman May 15 '12 at 12:43
    
There are plenty of scenarios where it would make sense to do that. Let's say for instance, that I try to serialize the state of my object. –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 12:45
    
@DanielRoseman: that's a good point, why did they include in the language something that isn't useful in the first place? –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 12:47
3  
__slots__ is a specialised tool. If you're not sure if you need it, you don't need it. –  Cat Plus Plus May 15 '12 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Short answer, You can't

The problem is that slots are themselves implemented in terms of descriptors. Given:

class Test(object):
    __slots__ = ("prop",)

t = Test()

the phrase:

t.prop

Is translated, approximately to:

Test.prop.__get__(t, Test)

where Test.prop is a <type 'member_descriptor'> crafted by the run-time specifically to load prop values out of Test instances from their reserved space.

If you add another descriptor to the class body definition, it masks out the member_descriptor that would let you get to the slotted attribute; there's no way to ask for it, it's just not there anymore. It's effectively like saying:

class Test(object):
    @property
    def prop(self):
        return self.__dict__['prop']

    @property
    def prop(self):
        return "property"

You've defined it twice. there's no way to "get at" the first prop definition.


but:

Long answer, you can't in a general way. You can

You can still abuse the python type system to get at it using another class definition. You can change the type of a python object, so long as it has the exact same class layout, which roughly means that it has all of the same slots:

>>> class Test1(object):
...     __slots__ = ["prop"]
...     prop = property(lambda self: "property")
... 
>>> class Test2(object):
...     __slots__ = ["prop"]
... 
>>> t = Test1()
>>> t.prop
'property'
>>> t.__class__ = Test2
>>> t.prop = 5
>>> t.prop
5
>>> t.__class__ = Test1
>>> t.prop
'property'

But there's no general way to introspect an instance to work out its class layout; you just have to know from context. You could look at it's __slots__ class attribute, but that won't tell you about the slots provided in the superclass (if any) nor will it give you any hint if that attribute has changed for some reason after the class was defined.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice hack. I want to see that one in production code ;) –  ch3ka May 15 '12 at 13:40
    
I hope never to see it in production. I've half a mind to remove it just to keep anyone from getting ideas. –  SingleNegationElimination May 15 '12 at 13:43
    
I'm not insterested about the hack. What I like in this answer is: 1: You can't, 2: the explanation about the <type 'member_descriptor'> pointing to a reserved space that you can't access in Python without the help of the descriptor. –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 13:45
    
Except, you can access it; but only through the descriptor the run-time hands you. If you've thrown it out, that's your error. –  SingleNegationElimination May 15 '12 at 13:46
    
seems I need a sarcasm sign. but yes, nice explanation that this has nothing to do with __slots__, and the "problem" is that you are shadowing the name. which -in a way- is the purpose of properties. –  ch3ka May 15 '12 at 13:53

I don't quite understand what and why you want to do this, but does this help you?

>>> class Test(object):
    __slots__ = ("prop",)
    prop = property(lambda self: "property")


>>> a = Test()
>>> b = Test()
>>> a.prop
'property'
>>> tmp = Test.prop
>>> Test.prop = 23
>>> a.prop
23
>>> Test.prop = tmp; del tmp
>>> b.prop
'property'

of course, you cannot overwrite the property on a per-instance basis, that's the whole point of slotted descriptors.

Note that subclasses of a class with __slots__ do have a __dict__ unless you manually define __slots__, so you can do:

>>> class Test2(Test):pass

>>> t = Test2()
>>> t.prop
'property'
>>> t.__dict__['prop'] = 5
>>> t.__dict__['prop']
5
>>> Test2.prop
<property object at 0x00000000032C4278>

but still:

>>> t.prop
'property'

and that's not because of __slots__, it's the way descriptors work.

your __dict__ is bypassed on attribute lookup, you are just abusing it as data structure that happens to be there for storing a state. it is equivalent to do this:

>>> class Test(object):
    __slots__ = ("prop", "state")
    prop = property(lambda self: "property")
    state = {"prop": prop}


>>> t.prop
'property'
>>> t.state["prop"] = 5
>>> t.state["prop"]
5
>>> t.prop
'property'
share|improve this answer
    
My question was about per-instance basis. All of this is for educational pupose. –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 13:13
    
The problem is that there is a single semantic to make a "property access" (going through the class/descriptors), and make an "instance attribute access". –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 13:25
    
@Flavien that is not a problem, that is what makes it unneccessary in python to write getter/setter for every public atribute. And I'm very glad we got that :) –  ch3ka May 15 '12 at 13:38
    
This is a strength, but a weakness at the same time. Your objects have data that you just can't access at will in some situations. I think this is just bad language design, as there are surely ways to have both at the same time (see C# properties). Like I said in my question, all it would take is a built-in function able to read from that reserved space directly. Why do we have __dict__ to read in some cases and nothing when __slots__ is used? This is just inconsistent. –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 13:42

If you really ever want to do something like that, and you REALL REALLY need something like that, you can always override __getattribute__ and __setattribute__, it's just as stupid... This is just to prove it to you:

class Test(object):
    __slots__ = ("prop",)
    prop = property(lambda self: "property")
    __internal__ = {}

    def __getattribute__(self, k):
        if k == "__dict__":
            return self.__internal__
        else:
            try:
                return object.__getattribute__(self, k)
            except AttributeError, e:
                try:
                    return self.__internal__[k]
                except KeyError:
                    raise e

    def __setattribute__(self, k, v):
        self.__internal__[k] = v
        object.__setattribute__(self, k, v)

t = Test()

print t.prop

t.__dict__["prop"] = "test"
print "from dict", t.__dict__["prop"]
print "from getattr", t.prop

import traceback
# These won't work: raise AttributeError
try:
    t.prop2 = "something"
except AttributeError:
    print "see? I told you!"
    traceback.print_exc()

try:
    print t.prop2
except AttributeError:
    print "Haha! Again!"
    traceback.print_exc()

(Tried it on Python 2.7) It's exactly what you expect I guess. Don't do this, it's useless.

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, but this is a hack. Here you end up having a dictionary in your class, which makes using __slots__ pointless, and you have no guarantee that what's in __internal__ reflects accurately what's in the slots (as you can easily change the content of __internal__ from the outside). –  Flavien May 15 '12 at 13:30
    
Of course it's a hack, but don't say you don't have complete control. It's a hack for a hacky situation. You can also as easily change the content of __dict__ from the outside. And you could add a check to verify that what's in __internal__ is always in __slots__... Once you override __setattribute__, __slots__ has no meaning anymore... –  jadkik94 May 15 '12 at 13:35
    
@Flavien sure, but your arguments also apply to your __dict__ "solution". I think you have to read up on how properties are implemented. –  ch3ka May 15 '12 at 13:35

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