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Sorry if this is too simple a question, but is there a sumif function in python that will sum by identifier and category? So in this case, I would like to have a function sumif which takes as arguments the identifier and the year and sums the amount. For example sumif('105','2006') should return 1200.

data = {'105':[{'2005': 500}, {'2005', 13000}, {'2006', 100}, {'2006', 200}, {'2006', 900}], '256': [{'2005', 5000}, {'2005', 800}]}
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Are you sure that is the correct data? {'2005': 500} is a dict but everything else is a set. –  jamylak May 15 '12 at 13:06
    
I'm new to dictionaries, so that's just the way I set it up. Is there a better way? –  myname May 15 '12 at 13:07
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there is a proper way :) it's always {key1: value1, key2: value2, ...} –  Pavel May 15 '12 at 13:08
2  
Not a better, but a correct way: {'2005': 500}. –  eumiro May 15 '12 at 13:08
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
>>> from collections import Counter
>>> data = {'105':[{'2005': 500}, {'2005': 13000}, {'2006': 100}, {'2006': 200}, {'2006': 900}], '256': [{'2005': 5000}, {'2005': 800}]}

>>> sum(map(Counter, data['105']), Counter())['2006']
1200

Therefore the definition of sumif would be:

sumif = lambda x, y: sum(map(Counter, data[x]), Counter())[y]
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if the parameters are constant and dicts have always the same size, it's something like

sum( d.values()[0] for d in data['105'] if d.keys()[0] == '2006')

there are many ways

a better question would be: where does the strange data structure (with singleton-dicts) come from?

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