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which of the following is the preferred way to close and declare the inputStream.

InputStream is = null; 
String md5;
try{
    is = new FileInputStream(FILE.getAbsoluteFile());
    md5 = UTILS.getMD5Info(is);
} finally{
    if(is != null) 
        is.close();
}

or

InputStream is = new FileInputStream(FILE.getAbsoluteFile()); 
String md5;
try{
    md5 = UTILS.getMD5Info(is);
} finally{
    is.close();
}

I don't see much difference between the two, but the 2nd way looks better as its a bit short. Is there any use of initializing the input stream inside a try block if we are not going to catch the exception and are just interested in garbage collecting the inputStream ?

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The first one is better. –  Tony Ennis May 15 '12 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If IOException was caught between the try and the finally, the first one would also handle the case where the constructor of the FileInputStream throws an IOException, whereas the second one would not. They wouldn't do the same thing. As is, the second one is cleaner.

Since Java 7, the best way is to use the try-with-resources statement:

try (InputStream is = new FileInputStream(FILE.getAbsoluteFile())) {
    md5 = UTILS.getMD5Info(is);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The second is cleaner or the first is? –  dj18 May 15 '12 at 13:16
    
What's ambiguous in "As is, the second one is cleaner"? –  JB Nizet May 15 '12 at 13:16
    
Just clarifying because you explain why the first is better, so I was wondering whether you meant to continue in the same vein and say that the first is cleaner. Can you expound on what makes the second "cleaner"? –  dj18 May 15 '12 at 13:22
    
I didn't say that the first one was better. I did say that, if there was a catch (IOException) clause between the try and the finally, both statements would do different things. Sometimes you want to catch the FileNotFoundException thrown by the constructor, and sometimes you don't want to. Since the IOException is not caught in the OP's snippets, there's no reason to wrap the stream creation inside the try block, since it forces the code to deal with null in the finally clause. In this case, the second one is thus cleaner. –  JB Nizet May 15 '12 at 13:28
    
Got it now. Thank you. –  dj18 May 15 '12 at 13:43

How about using Java 7 feature try-with-resources?

try (InputStream is = new FileInputStream(FILE.getAbsoluteFile())) {
    ...
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

As it is pretty ugly if you want to be absolutely precise (don't forget that any reader might throw an additional IOException on close()!):

InputStream is = null;

try {
    is = new FileInputStream(FILE.getAbsoluteFile());

    // Your md5() magic here

} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    if (is != null) {
        try {
            is.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

In your 2nd version, you do not handle the case when the constructor throws an exception (e.g., the file cannot be found or you do not have the privileges to access it).

If you want to handle that case as well, you need to declare the InputStream before the try-catch block (or add throws IOException to the current function definition).

But then you need to check if it has been properly initialized, i.e., it is not null in the finally block.

Moreover, if you want to close() the stream, you have to handle the possible IOException (normally that never happen if you were able to open the stream).

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The problem with the 2nd approach is that FileInputStream constructor can throw a FileNotFoundException exception which you will not catch within the try block you specified (in case you will want to catch such exception) so with this approach you have less control.

I would go with the first one.

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