Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written a simple tcp server using gevent.StreamServer for testing purposes. In order for me to send responses to some of the clients, I need a non-blocking way to handle input via raw_input(), preferrably without using threads.

After some googling I stumbled across this question: How to make non-blocking raw_input when using eventlet.monkey_patch() and why it block everything, even when executed on another thread?

I've written the following and it does exactly what I want however I assume there's better approach to it. Could someone point me to the right direction? Also, an idea why the try/except does not catch the KeyboardInterrupt is appreciated.

import select
from gevent.monkey import patch_all
from gevent.server import StreamServer

patch_all(os=True, select=True)

def raw_input(message):
    """ Non-blocking input from stdin. """
    sys.stdout.write(message)

    select.select([sys.stdin], [], [])
    return sys.stdin.readline()

def main():
    """ Run the server, listen for commands """

    server = StreamServer(("0.0.0.0", 6000), handle)
    print "Starting server"
    gevent.signal(signal.SIGTERM, server.close)
    gevent.signal(signal.SIGQUIT, server.close)
    gevent.signal(signal.SIGINT, server.close)

    server.start()
    while True:
        try:
            a = raw_input("")
            if a:
                print "Received %s" % a
            gevent.sleep(0)
        except KeyboardInterrupt:
            print "Received a shutdown signal, going down ..."
            server.stop()
            sys.exit(0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

EDIT: I've rewritten parts of the code and I now understand the silliness of the main()-function. I'll post it as an edit in case someone stumbles on this question and has a better idea on how to do it.

from gevent.signal import signal

def get_console_input():
    """ Non-blocking console input to the server """

    select.select([sys.stdin], [], [])
    # There's quite a bit of code here but it is input handling so 
    # for shortness's sake   I've snipped everything and return the line read.
    return sys.stdin.readline()

def exit(server):
    """ Quit the server gracefully """

    print "Received shutdown signal, going down. """
    server.close()
    sys.exit(0)

def main():
    """ The main function. Create and run the server, listen for commands and
   append any command to the server so it can send them on to the clients """

    # Myserver is a class which inherits from gevent.server.StreamServer.
    # Myserver could just as well be replaced by gevent.server.StreamServer.

    server = MyServer(("0.0.0.0", PORT))
    print "Starting server"

    # Add some signal handlers to quit the server gracefully.
    gevent.signal(signal.SIGTERM, exit, server)
    gevent.signal(signal.SIGQUIT, exit, server)
    gevent.signal(signal.SIGINT, exit, server)

    # Server started in async mode
    server.start()

    while True:
        get_console_input()
        gevent.sleep(0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simplest way I've found to do this is to use gevent.socket.wait_read to wait until sys.stdin can be read:

wait_read(sys.stdin.fileno())
return sys.stdin.readline()

I've also written a small wrapper around file descriptors to give them non-blocking .read() and .write() methods: https://gist.github.com/2915875

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, seems to be quite what I'm looking for! –  msvalkon Jun 12 '12 at 10:48
    
Works well in OSX, but doesn't seem to work properly in Windows. The wait_read raises "IOError: [Errno 0] No error" –  Ian E Feb 2 '13 at 20:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.