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At all the companies I have worked at I end up championing a core set of libraries that do nothing more than enhance and extend the .net libraries. Usually I have the namespaces such that they start with our company name but the sub namespaces mirror those of the System namespace.

Foo.IO;
Foo.Web

What I plan to do is take this one step further and replace the company namespace with the system namespace so that you only have to have the one using statement and thus have a better enhancement to the core library.

namespace System.IO
{
    public static class StreamExtensions
    {
        ...
    }
}

The actual question

Now I know that this is possible, Microsoft do it in their own libraries and I have seen it done in other third party libraries but what I want to know is what, if any, are the long term implications of doing this such as a class name conflict in later versions of .net? Has anyone done this and had to handle a complication that has broken the simplicity of just being able to add an assembly reference?

UPDATE

Unfortunately this has turned into more of a debate of whether you should or should not do this which probably belongs over on Programmers. Indecently there is another SO question which does ask this but that was not the point of the question.

I wanted to know if there is a scenario that would crop up further down the road that would cause compilation errors or a strange behavior. The only two arguments that have come up is.

  1. Microsoft adds a method to an object that matches the signature of extension method in the library but this is a mute point as it would make no difference to what namespace the extension method lives in as the implementation on the object would take precedence.

  2. Someone else does the same thing in their third party library and we have a name clash. This is more likely and something we already have to deal with where third party libraries ILMerge other libraries into their assembly.

Just to be clear this is a stand alone library, it is for in house use, not to be made available externally and is there to extend the existing System libraries through Extension methods.

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3  
If the only reason you're doing this is to not have to include an extra namespace then I'd advise against it. –  Nick May 15 '12 at 13:16
    
@Nick Thanks for the comment but on what grounds? It is a valid statement but the question about what are the implications. Other people, including myself, have shied away from doing this because of a "gut" feeling about messing with someone else's namespace but no one has said do not do it because of this. If you have a specific factual reason I would love to hear it. –  Bronumski May 15 '12 at 13:21
1  
I guess it's mostly just the 'gut' feeling that it's wrong. Good question though! –  Nick May 15 '12 at 13:29
1  
Aside from being a big believer that namespace should bear some vague resemblance to the dll it's defined in. What would happen if you were merging with an other codebase, where they'd done something similar? Namespaces were designed in to segregate code, to avoid the confusion you are planning on creating. –  Tony Hopkinson May 15 '12 at 13:35
1  
I've actually used this technique myself for my own extensions library, and I see no harm in doing it. The reason is that you're not technically "adding" to the namespace through the use of extensions. You're just extending the functionality on certain types. By including it in one of our company base projects, all of these extension methods were available for other developers to discover and use, without having to include an additional reference. As to whether it's a bad design decision: that's entirely up to you. Ensure you have unique names and there shouldn't be class conflicts. –  SPFiredrake May 15 '12 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

I would suggest do not do this. System namespace is .NET Framework namespace, if you want to customize classes from that namespace, make it explicit in your code.

That means make the customized class part of you custom namespace.

Do not mess up the things.

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I appreciate that this is your opinion but on what grounds. What is the "technical" impact? –  Bronumski May 15 '12 at 13:25
    
The negative impact can not be only technical (I don't see much technical impact except messing up with namespaces). The bad about this, imo, is not technocal negative impact, but bad readability so maintanibility impact. –  Tigran May 15 '12 at 13:27
    
True but the other half of the conversation belongs over on programmers. This was not intended to open up a debate, I wanted a "if you do this then this specific bad thing could come up bit you", or a "No, its all cool carry on". –  Bronumski May 15 '12 at 13:30
1  
@Bronumski: ok, so my answer is: no, it's a bad design, do not do that, for the reasons explained above. –  Tigran May 15 '12 at 13:33
    
@downvoter: any reason? –  Tigran May 15 '12 at 14:55

This may be a little off-topic, but in reference to the alternative approach you mention:

Usually I have the namespaces such that they start with our company name but the sub namespaces mirror those of the System namespace.

I've had some issues with that approach.

My company name is Resolv - as such, a lot of the stuff I write ends up going into a namespace in the form of Resolv.<ProjectName> (the rest will be <ClientName>.<ProjectName>).

I started building my library of extension methods, static classes and so-on in a namespace called Resolv.System

However, that created namespace resolution issues when using "fully qualified" type names that start with System (e.g. var myVar = new System.Collections.List<int>();).

While I would never use a fully qualified in that particular case, it's something I do on occasion if the type I'm creating is the only one from a particular namespace in the entire code file (so doesn't warrant adding a using) - or on those occasions when two namespaces imported (with using statements) contain conflicting type names.

Of course, when I'm working on some namespace within Resolv, and I put in what should be a fully qualified name like that, confusion ensues because of the Resolv.System namespace (the compiler walks back up the current namespace to get to Resolv and then finds Resolv.System - which means that new System.Collections.List<int>() attempts to use the non-existent class Resolv.System.Collections.List<int>()).

Of course, I can get around that by using the form var myVar = new global::System.Collections.List<int>() but that's sort of a pain).

I've opted instead to put in a "project name" in my extensions namespace tree, so now instead of Resolv.System I have Resolv.Extensions.System. That way I can have better control over whether I want to have System.xxx.xxxx references refer to my extensions, or the .net ones from any given code file (and it's only one using statement to add to my code files when I want to "turn on extensions"). Of course, I'll still have the System.xxx.xxx namespace confusion when working on types inside the Resolv.Extensions namespace - but that shouldn't bug me on a daily basis! :)

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What I plan to do is take this one step further and replace the company namespace with the system namespace so that you only have to have the one using statement and thus have a better enhancement to the core library.

I don't understand how this will enchance the core library. What happens when Microsoft adds the same method to the String class and it does something entirely different? This is the reason they should be in their own namespace.

Now I know that this is possible, Microsoft do it in their own libraries and I have seen it done in other third party libraries but what I want to know is what, if any, are the long term implications of doing this such as a class name conflict in later versions of .net?

The long term implications is if Microsoft adds the same method to a class as the extension method you create.

Has anyone done this and had to handle a complication that has broken the simplicity of just being able to add an assembly reference?

I don't understand the reason you want to reduce the amount of references. You gain nothing by doing this, having utility methods in their own namespace and class is a valid design decision, people assume they will be seperate and not part of a Microsoft namespace.

It is a valid statement but the question about what are the implications. Other people, including myself, have shied away from doing this because of a "gut" feeling about messing with someone else's namespace but no one has said do not do it because of this. If you have a specific factual reason I would love to hear it.

The implication is a developers assumptions that the System namespace is filled with only Microsoft code.

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"The long term implications is if Microsoft adds the same method to a class as the extension method you create." Are no different than if the Extension method lived in another namespace. The method on the object takes precedence over an extension method regardless of what namespace the extension method lives in. –  Bronumski May 15 '12 at 14:58
    
@Bronumski - I was suggesting not even using an extension method but have them entirely seperate has utlity methods. –  Ramhound May 15 '12 at 15:27
    
So are you advocating not using extension methods at all for objects in System namespace? –  Bronumski May 15 '12 at 15:30

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