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I'm trying to make a search method using a binary tree(no, it's not a binary search tree, just a binary tree) using a recursive function. If the data is on the binary tree, i want it to return the node and if it is not, i want it to return a NULL value. I have made the search function and it's doing its job perfectly. But the problem is, it seems that the function won't return the node.

Here's the struct for the binary tree:

struct data
{
    int number;
    struct data *left, *right;
}*root = NULL;

and this is the search function i'm talking about:

data* search(struct data *node, int key)
{
    if(node == NULL)
        return NULL;
    else
    {
        printf("\n%d %d -", node->number, key);

        if(node->number== key)
            return node;

        search(node->left, key);
        search(node->right, key);
    }
}

When i'm calling the search function like this: search(root, 6); , it says that it's returning a NULL value although i have pushed a 6 number into the binary tree(and the search function stops right at the return node; line too, so i'm assuming that the function is returning a NULL.)

I have seen a tutorial for binary tree in here , used and changed some code from it, but it's still the same. i'm desperately looking for help right here :(

share|improve this question
2  
C or C++? Fundamentally different beasts. – Konrad Rudolph May 15 '12 at 13:58
    
When some invocation returns a non-null pointer, what happens to that value? – Jerry Coffin May 15 '12 at 13:59
    
@KonradRudolph: actually it's C, but i'm using a C++ compiler, so, i think it won't be a problem . . – aquatorrent May 15 '12 at 14:05
    
@Jerry Coffin: i'm not sure if i'm answering this right, but when it's not returning a non-null value, i want to push another data to the tree. – aquatorrent May 15 '12 at 14:07
    
@aquatorrent It might not be a problem but that’s not why I asked. Rather, a good C++ solution would look completely different, and hence good advice should take this into account. – Konrad Rudolph May 15 '12 at 14:10
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your function will always return NULL, except when the top node contains the key. Your function does not do anything with the results from its recursive invocations; in fact, control flow may "fall off the end" of it without hitting a return statement.

You should check the return values from the recursive invocations and pass those up when appropriate:

if (node == NULL)
    return NULL;
else if (node->number == key)
    return node;
else {
    data *left = search(node->left, key);
    return left? left: search(node->right, key);
}

Note the "ternary operator" (if-then-else expression) ?:.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, but -1. When control flows off the end of the function after the recursive calls, you can't depend on it returning NULL (or anything else in particular). – Jerry Coffin May 15 '12 at 14:01
    
@JerryCoffin: it won't. The return values of the recursive calls are used in a return statement. – larsmans May 15 '12 at 14:03
1  
It's not running off the end--it's always returning one of three cases: NULL if node == NULL, node if node->number == key, and (data* || data*) in the third case. If the first search returns non-NULL, its value is used; if the second search returns non-NULL, its value is used; otherwise, it returns (data*)(0||0), which happens to be NULL. – Tim Lesher May 15 '12 at 14:03
2  
@larsmans: I'm not talking about your function (which is fine) but your statement that "Your function will always return NULL..." In his function, after the recursive calls, control flows off the end without returning any value. The precise result of that is (if memory serves) different between C and C++, but you certainly can't depend on it being NULL. – Jerry Coffin May 15 '12 at 14:04
    
@JerryCoffin: you're right, hadn't spotted that. Fixed it now. – larsmans May 15 '12 at 14:07

it will not return the searched node unless you use the return value of you search

change it to something like this.

data* search(struct data *node, int key)
{
  if(node == NULL)
    return NULL;
  else
  {
    printf("\n%d %d -", node->number, key);

    if(node->number== key)
        return node;
    struct data *tmp;
    tmp = search(node->left, key);
    /* node found ? */
    if (tmp)
        return tmp;
    tmp = search(node->right, key);
    /* node found ? */
    if (tmp)
        return tmp;
  }
  /* search didn't find anything */
  return NULL;
}
share|improve this answer

You're never actually returning the result from the recursive calls to search.

You need to check the return value from those calls, and if they found the node, return it

data* search(struct data *node, int key)
{
    data* found = NULL;

    if(node == NULL)
        return NULL;

    printf("\n%d %d -", node->number, key);

    if(node->number== key)
        return node;

    found = search(node->left, key);
    if (found)
        return found;

    found = search(node->right, key);
    if (found)
       return found;

    return NULL;
}
share|improve this answer

There is a much easier and more efficient way to make a binary tree, and that's simply with a vector/array.

i is the int to access your vector. To go right, i=i*2. to go left, i=i*2+1. They will never share a same spot and assuming equal distribution each spot will be taken.

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