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I stumbled upon a new exercise in "How to Think like a Computer Scientist". (Open documentation @ http://www.openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english2e/ch07.html)

Hope to receive some directions on this:

prefix="JKLMNOPQ"
suffix="ack"

for letter in prefix:
    print letter + suffix

and you get Jack, Kack, Lack, Mack, Nack, Oack, Pack & Qack.

What should I modify so that instead of Oack and Qack, I get Ouack and Quack?

For the sake of learning, what I attempted was:

prefix="JKLMNOPQ"
suffix="ack"

for letter in prefix:
  if letter = "O" or "U":
    print letter + "u" + suffix
  else:
    print letter + suffix

As most of you would notice at first sight, the syntax error committed is in using = instead of == in the if function call.

Thanks for all your prompt assistance, I greatly appreciate them.

share|improve this question
2  
What did you try? –  David Cain May 15 '12 at 14:12
4  
You should accept some answers from past questions. –  jordanm May 15 '12 at 14:13
1  
think about "if letter is O or Q, then print letter+u+suffix, otherwise just print letter+suffix" –  Pavel May 15 '12 at 14:14
3  
Your SyntaxError is because you're using = (assignment) when you should be using == (equality) –  mgilson May 15 '12 at 14:40
1  
-1. You need to accept answers, not just edit the question. –  SomeKittens Ux2666 May 15 '12 at 15:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The given example relies on the fact that when iterated, a string gives each of its individual characters. Since you want some of your prefixes to have two characters, you have to break up your string into a separate one for each of the characters and add the u where you want it.

prefixes=["J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "Ou", "P", "Qu"]
suffix="ack"

for letters in prefixes:
    print letters + suffix
share|improve this answer

I won't solve this for you, but will give you a hint: the if statement might come in handy.

share|improve this answer
    
I did that originally; turns out that i committed a syntax error. Pardons for the post. –  Jason HJH. May 15 '12 at 14:15
1  
@JasonHJH: If you've tried something and it didn't work, you have to post what you tried and how it didn't work. Otherwise we'll probably just tell you what didn't work. –  Gabe May 15 '12 at 14:17
    
@Gabe got it, thanks. –  Jason HJH. May 15 '12 at 14:19
prefix="JKLMNOPQ"
suffix="ack"

for letter in prefix:
    if letter =='O' or letter=='Q':
      print "".join((letter,'u',suffix))
    else:
      print "".join((letter,suffix))



Jack
Kack
Lack
Mack
Nack
Ouack
Pack
Quack
share|improve this answer

Look for the two prefixes (Q and O), then add the 'u', otherwise just print as before

for letter in prefix:
   if letter in ['Q', 'O']:
      print letter + 'u' + suffix
   else:
      print letter + suffix

yields:

Jack
Kack
Lack
Mack
Nack
Ouack
Pack
Quack
share|improve this answer

Here is regex solution:

import re
prefix="JKLMNOPQ"
suffix="ack"
names=[re.sub("([OQ])","\\1u",p) + suffix for p in prefixes]
print "\n".join(names)

I think the problem specified is to correct the input, i.e. it's not a question about how the input sucks and should be of the form ["J","K","L","M","N","Ou","P","Qu"] or whatever. Typically a regex substitution can be a good way of fixing string input. If you intend to "think more like a computer scientist" I also recommend trying to use list comprehensions as much as possible to get the hang of them, and treat output as a separate concern.

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Using map function and regex

RX = lambda x: re.sub("(O|Q)","\\1u",x)
map(RX,[x+suffix for x in prefix])
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If I understand the question (that being how to add the u only for a Q/O prefix) you end up with something like this:

for letter in prefix:
     word = letter
     if letter in ["O","U"]:
        word += "u"
     print word . suffix
share|improve this answer
    
I get a run-time error with this .. did this work for you when you ran it? –  Levon May 15 '12 at 14:19
    
"." is not a concatenation operator in python. –  jordanm May 15 '12 at 14:33
    
this is not PHP. –  undefined is not a function May 15 '12 at 15:08

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