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I have the following code to do this, but how can I do it better? Right now I think it's better than nested loops, but it starts to get Perl-one-linerish when you have a generator in a list comprehension.

day_count = (end_date - start_date).days + 1
for single_date in [d for d in (start_date + timedelta(n) for n in range(day_count)) if d <= end_date]:
    print strftime("%Y-%m-%d", single_date.timetuple())

Notes

  • I'm not actually using this to print. That's just for demo purposes.
  • The start_date and end_date variables are datetime.date objects because I don't need the timestamps. (They're going to be used to generate a report).

Sample Output

For a start date of 2009-05-30 and an end date of 2009-06-09:

2009-05-30
2009-05-31
2009-06-01
2009-06-02
2009-06-03
2009-06-04
2009-06-05
2009-06-06
2009-06-07
2009-06-08
2009-06-09
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2  
Just to point out: I don't think there's any difference between 'time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d", single_date.timetuple())' and the shorter 'single_date.strftime("%Y-%m-%d")'. Most answers seem to be copying the longer style. –  Mu Mind Sep 21 '10 at 13:20
4  
Wow, these answers are much too complicated. Try this: stackoverflow.com/questions/7274267/… –  Gringo Suave Sep 19 '12 at 19:47
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8 Answers

up vote 95 down vote accepted

Why are the two nested iterations? For me it produces the same list of data with only one iteration:

for single_date in (start_date + timedelta(n) for n in range(day_count)):
    print ...

And not list get stored, only one generator is iterated over. Also the "if" in the generator seems to be unnecessary.

After all, a linear sequence should only require one iterator, not two.

Update after discussion with John Machin:

Maybe the most elegant solution is using a generator function to completely hide/abstract the iteration over the range of dates:

def daterange(start_date, end_date):
    for n in range(int ((end_date - start_date).days)):
        yield start_date + timedelta(n)

for single_date in daterange(start_date, end_date):
    print strftime("%Y-%m-%d", single_date.timetuple())

NB: For consistency withe built-in range() function this iteration stops before reaching the end_date. So for inclusive iteration use the next day, as you would with range().

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3  
-1 ... having a preliminary calculation of day_count and using range is not awesome when a simple while loop will suffice. –  John Machin Jun 29 '09 at 22:44
2  
@Ber: Haven't you seen Sean Cavanagh's code? –  John Machin Jun 30 '09 at 8:19
2  
@John Machin: Okay. I do however prever an iteration over while loops with explicit incrementation of some counter or value. The interation pattern is more pythonic (at least in my personal view) and also more general, as it allows to express an iteration while hiding the details of how that iteration is done. –  Ber Jun 30 '09 at 9:57
5  
@Ber: I don't like it at all; it's DOUBLY bad. You ALREADY had an iteration! By wrapping the complained-about constructs in a generator, you have added even more execution overhead plus diverted the user's attention to somewhere else to read your 3-liner's code and/or docs. -2 –  John Machin Jun 30 '09 at 10:36
5  
If you're going for terseness you can use a generator expression: (start_date + datetime.timedelta(n) for n in range((end_date - start_date).days)) –  Mark Ransom Apr 3 '12 at 19:35
show 7 more comments

This might be more clear:

d = start_date
delta = datetime.timedelta(days=1)
while d <= end_date:
    print d.strftime("%Y-%m-%d")
    d += delta
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1  
For printing the time, you can just do: d.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") –  semperos Nov 18 '10 at 13:49
    
Yes you can! Thanks! –  Sean Cavanagh Feb 23 '11 at 21:13
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Use the dateutil library:

from datetime import date
from dateutil.rrule import rrule, DAILY

a = date(2009, 5, 30)
b = date(2009, 6, 9)

for dt in rrule(DAILY, dtstart=a, until=b):
    print dt.strftime("%Y-%m-%d")

This python library has many more advanced features, some very useful, like relative deltas—and is implemented as a single file (module) that's easily included into a project.

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How is this different from @perxier's response? –  Eduardo May 18 '11 at 21:28
10  
@eduardocereto : my answer predates @perxier's answer by almost an year. Maybe you should ask him instead. –  nosklo May 25 '11 at 2:34
2  
didn't see yours, mate, deleted mine –  parxier Nov 24 '11 at 3:59
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import datetime

def daterange(start, stop, step=datetime.timedelta(days=1), inclusive=False):
  # inclusive=False to behave like range by default
  if step.days > 0:
    while start < stop:
      yield start
      start = start + step
      # not +=! don't modify object passed in if it's mutable
      # since this function is not restricted to
      # only types from datetime module
  elif step.days < 0:
    while start > stop:
      yield start
      start = start + step
  if inclusive and start == stop:
    yield start

# ...

for date in daterange(start_date, end_date, inclusive=True):
  print strftime("%Y-%m-%d", date.timetuple())

This function does more than you strictly require, by supporting negative step, etc. As long as you factor out your range logic, then you don't need the separate day_count and most importantly the code becomes easier to read as you call the function from multiple places.

share|improve this answer
    
Variable delta –  Evan Fosmark Jun 29 '09 at 20:47
    
Thanks, renamed to more closely match range's parameters, forgot to change in the body. –  Roger Pate Jun 29 '09 at 20:56
    
+1 ... but as you are allowing the step to be a timedelta, you should either (a) call it dateTIMErange() and make steps of e.g. timedelta(hours=12) and timedelta(hours=36) work properly or (b) trap steps that aren't an integral number of days or (c) save the caller the hassle and express the step as a number of days instead of a timedelta. –  John Machin Jun 30 '09 at 11:57
    
Any timedelta should work already, but I did add datetime_range and date_range to my personal scrap collection after writing this, because of (a). Not sure another function is worthwhile for (c), the most common case of days=1 is already taken care of, and having to pass an explicit timedelta avoids confusion. Maybe uploading it somewhere is best: bitbucket.org/kniht/scraps/src/tip/python/gen_range.py –  Roger Pate Jun 30 '09 at 20:49
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Why not try:

import datetime as dt

n = dt.datetime(2012, 12,31)
s = dt.datetime(2012, 1,1)

for i in range((n - s).days + 1):
    print (s+dt.timedelta(days = i)).date()
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Thanks for this one; Works great for what I need –  armani Jul 9 '13 at 18:17
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import datetime

def daterange(start, stop, step_days=1):
    current = start
    step = datetime.timedelta(step_days)
    if step_days > 0:
        while current < stop:
            yield current
            current += step
    elif step_days < 0:
        while current > stop:
            yield current
            current += step
    else:
        raise ValueError("daterange() step_days argument must not be zero")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    from pprint import pprint as pp
    lo = datetime.date(2008, 12, 27)
    hi = datetime.date(2009, 1, 5)
    pp(list(daterange(lo, hi)))
    pp(list(daterange(hi, lo, -1)))
    pp(list(daterange(lo, hi, 7)))
    pp(list(daterange(hi, lo, -7))) 
    assert not list(daterange(lo, hi, -1))
    assert not list(daterange(hi, lo))
    assert not list(daterange(lo, hi, -7))
    assert not list(daterange(hi, lo, 7))
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for i in range(16):
    print datetime.date.today() + datetime.timedelta(days=i)
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What about the following for doing a range incremented by days:

for d in map( lambda x: startDate+datetime.timedelta(days=x), xrange( (stopDate-startDate).days ) ):
  # Do stuff here
  • startDate and stopDate are datetime.date objects

For a generic version:

for d in map( lambda x: startTime+x*stepTime, xrange( (stopTime-startTime).total_seconds() / stepTime.total_seconds() ) ):
  # Do stuff here
  • startTime and stopTime are datetime.date or datetime.datetime object (both should be the same type)
  • stepTime is a timedelta object

Note that .total_seconds() is only supported after python 2.7 If you are stuck with an earlier version you can write your own function:

def total_seconds( td ):
  return float(td.microseconds + (td.seconds + td.days * 24 * 3600) * 10**6) / 10**6
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