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I thought I was doing this right but it doesn't seem to be working. I'm basically experimenting with a queue and it works fine with one data type but now I'm trying to add multiple(in the end I want to have a int and a list of ints).

Here's the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <queue>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    struct product {
      int x;
      int y;
    } ;


   queue<product> q;
   q.push(100, 100);
   q.push(200, 100);
   q.push(300, 100);
   q.push(400, 100);

   cout << "Size of the queue: " << q.size() << endl;

   while (!q.empty()) {
       cout << q.front() << endl;
       q.pop();
   }

}

It works without the struct, but obviously it only accepts one variable for each item in the queue that way. Is there a way to have multiple items?

share|improve this question
    
Your question is unclear. What do you mean by adding multiple items? – Attila May 15 '12 at 14:37
    
@Attila I would like a queue with multiple datatypes per queue item. So in this example, each item of the queue has two ints. – Lostsoul May 15 '12 at 14:39
    
You can't have a queue with more than one datatype, but you can have a queue of say variants over several datatypes. Look for Boost.Variant. – K-ballo May 15 '12 at 14:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the type specified for the template type cannot be a local definition. Change to:

struct product {
  int x;
  int y;
} ;

int main()
{

As others have already stated, add a constructor to product that accepts both arguments:

struct product {
    int x;
    int y;
    product(int a_x, int a_y) : x(a_x), y(a_y) {}
};

...

q.push_back(product(100, 100));

You could also overload operator<< for outputting a product:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& a_out, const product& a_p)
{
    a_out << "product(" << a_p.x << ", " << a_p.y << ")";
    return a_out;
}

while (!q.empty()) {
    cout << q.front() << endl;
    q.pop();
}
share|improve this answer
    
And the constructor thing the others said. – RedX May 15 '12 at 15:01
    
+1 That was it! – Lostsoul May 15 '12 at 15:01
    
Interestingly, the local type can be defined as a template parameter at the least in VS 2010. The code I wrote as an answer works fine with VS 2010. – Jaywalker May 16 '12 at 8:41
    
@Jaywalker, really? That is what I checked with (plus g++), but I compiled with extensions disabled (/Za compiler flag). – hmjd May 16 '12 at 8:51

The queue::push method expects one parameter, which must be of the type of your queue. Try it like this:

queue<product> q;
q.push(product(100, 100));
q.push(product(200, 100));
q.push(product(300, 100));
q.push(product(400, 100));

You'd also have to define a constructor for your struct:

struct product {
  int x;
  int y;
  product(int _x, int _y) : x(_x), y(_y) {}
} ;
share|improve this answer
    
I see get the same error(your approach is the same as Jaywalker's). and if I use your constructor or his, I still get the same problem. – Lostsoul May 15 '12 at 14:54

Here's how your main should look like. Note the addition of the constructor product(int i, int j), and the use of the constructor in adding elements to q.

int main ()
{
    struct product {
      int x;
      int y;

      product (int i, int j) : x(i), y(j) {}
    } ;

   queue<product> q;
   q.push(product (100, 100));
   q.push(product (200, 100));
   q.push(product (300, 100));
   q.push(product (400, 100));

   cout << "Size of the queue: " << q.size() << endl;

   while (!q.empty()) {
       cout << q.front().x << ", " << q.front().y << endl;
       q.pop();
   }

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't seem to work for me. I get a bunch of errors. template arguement invalid, invalid type in declaration before ';', etc.. – Lostsoul May 15 '12 at 14:52
    
the first 4 errors seem to be related to the line queue<product> q; – Lostsoul May 15 '12 at 14:55
    
hmjd's answer and yours did it. I was missing the constructor and it couldn't be locally declared.. – Lostsoul May 15 '12 at 15:02

q.push(100, 100) is invalid, queue::push() takes only one parameter. You will need to push a product instead:

product p(100, 100);
q.push(p);

Then you have both 100s in the queue (stored in the product stucture).

If you want to store both a product1 and a product2, you will need a common base structure that both extends and store pointers (to the base) instead of the values themselves (to avoud slicing). At this point you might as well use class instead of struct

share|improve this answer

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