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Please see the following code:

char h[256];
    h[0]=NULL;
    if(h!=NULL)
    {
        printf("It doesn't show NULL\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("It shows NULL\n");
    }

and also the following:

char h[256];
        if(h!=NULL)
        {
            printf("It doesn't show NULL\n");
        }
        else
        {
            printf("It shows NULL\n");
        }

and also the following:

 char h[256];
h[0]='\0';
            if(h!=NULL)
            {
                printf("It doesn't show NULL\n");
            }
            else
            {
                printf("It shows NULL\n");
            }

In every case the char* h doesn't have NULL. Why is it the case? Isn't it suppose to have NULL as I'm not storing anything there? And if it's not the case, how I can I make sure that it contains nothing but NULL?

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

h[0] is not the same as h. h[0] is the first character in the array; h is the array itself (which decays to a pointer in this situation).

Try this:

char h[256];
h[0]=NULL;
if(h[0]!=NULL)
{
    printf("It doesn't show NULL\n");
}
else
{
    printf("It shows NULL\n");
}

Note also that you probably shouldn't be using NULL in this situation. NULL is for pointers; you want '\0' instead.

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Since you're allocating the char[] array on the stack it cannot be NULL. h will always point to a valid location within memory, so your checks must fail.

If you want to initialize your array without data you should use

char h[256] = {'\0'};

'\0' is the NUL character which is not the same as NULL

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Thats because your condition is if(h != NULL) which means you're actually comparing address of h which certainly will not NULL. Had it been if(*h != NULL), first and third case would definitely execute else part. As of second part, it will be containing some garbage value at h[0], so by chance if its 0, it will execute else part.

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Instead of

if(h!=NULL)

Why don't you use

if(h[0]!=NULL)

As you are initializing the first element of the array as null, not the array itself! To make sure that the elements are null use

for(i=0; i<h.length ; i++)
 h[i]=NULL;

or use '\0' instead of NULL

As to why h is not NULL try printing h in java, the following would return a @....... value, which is basically the location the variable is pointing. (not null!)

System.out.println(c);

( long time since used c, so don't know if you can do similar thing in c)

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The definition

char h[256]

means h is an array. An array can't be NULL. An array is an area in memory storing a sequence of values.

You are somehow confusing h with a pointer.

Even if it was a pointer, the value of a pointer is not the same as the value of the thing pointed at.

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