Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to parse a website's source to extract text inside using lxml library. Here is my code

import urllib2
from StringIO import StringIO
from lxml import html
from lxml.html.clean import Cleaner

cleaner = Cleaner(page_structure = False)
htmlsource = cleaner.clean_html(urllib2.urlopen("http://www.verycd.com/").read())
htmltree = html.parse(StringIO(htmlsource.decode("utf-8"))).getroot()
listnode = htmltree.xpath("*")
for node in listnode:
  print node.text_content().strip().encode("utf-8")

When I run the code in interactive console, the result looks like this (dev environment)

VeryCD电驴大全 - 分享互联网
用户名:
        密码:记住我 


        免费注册
         |
        忘记密码?



            首页 |
            商城 |
            专题 |
            乐园 |

            社区 |
            电驴 |
            网页游戏 |
            网址大全

But in production environment, all unicode characters displayed incorrectly

VeryCDçµé©´å¤§å¨ - å享äºèç½
ç¨æ·åï¼
        å¯ç ï¼è®°ä½æ 

        Â 
        å费注å
         |
        å¿è®°å¯ç ï¼



            é¦é¡µ |
            åå |
            ä¸é¢ |
            ä¹å |

            ç¤¾åº |
            çµé©´ |
            ç½é¡µæ¸¸æ |
            ç½å大å¨

Any idea how can I fix this?

EDIT

Seems like I found the problem here. I think there is some thing wrong with lxml builtin GAE. If I don't use cleaner before parsing html, the output is fine.

# cleaner = Cleaner(page_structure = False)
# htmlsource = cleaner.clean_html(urllib2.urlopen("http://www.verycd.com/").read())
htmlsource = urllib2.urlopen("http://www.verycd.com/").read()
htmltree = html.parse(StringIO(htmlsource.decode("utf-8"))).getroot()
share|improve this question
    
Never, ever use print inside a webapp! –  Nick Johnson May 16 '12 at 4:53
    
I just try to run the code in interactive console, but I don't understand why the results between 2 environment are different –  qazplm 4ever May 16 '12 at 7:47
    
@NickJohnson Why not? This is a CGI app, so printing is perfectly normal. (Unless you meant don't print unicode -- true, but the author changed it to explicitly encode, which should be fine.) I've reproduced this and it seems like a bug in lxml on production (not the dev appserver). To simplify the example, any Unicode text passed to lxml.html.parse will come out encoded in UTF-8 and decoded as Latin-1, which is completely wrong. I will investigate this further. –  mgiuca May 17 '12 at 3:36
    
I have filed a bug for this issue: code.google.com/p/googleappengine/issues/detail?id=7526 –  mgiuca May 17 '12 at 5:48
    
@mgiuca No, it's not a CGI app - it's just a snippet of code that uses print. For it to be CGI, it would have to, at a minimum, print headers. –  Nick Johnson May 17 '12 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Update: This bug is fixed in App Engine, so the following work-around should no longer be necessary.

I've accepted this as a bug in either lxml or App Engine. But you can work around it using lxml.etree.parse and lxml.etree.HTMLParser (note that lxml.html is a simple wrapper around these two):

import urllib2
from StringIO import StringIO
from lxml import etree
from lxml.html.clean import Cleaner

cleaner = Cleaner(page_structure = False)
htmlsource = cleaner.clean_html(urllib2.urlopen("http://www.verycd.com/").read())
htmlparser = etree.HTMLParser(encoding='utf-8')
htmltree = etree.parse(StringIO(htmlsource.decode("utf-8")),
                       parser=htmlparser).getroot()
listnode = htmltree.xpath("*")
for node in listnode:
  print node.text.strip().encode("utf-8")

That is:

  • Create an HTMLParser object, explicitly setting encoding='utf-8'.
  • Use etree.parse instead of html.parse; pass parser=htmlparser to etree.parse.
  • Use node.text instead of node.text_content().

This works around the bug by explicitly telling the HTMLParser to use UTF-8 encoding instead of having it guess (it guesses Latin-1 incorrectly).

share|improve this answer
    
Specifying encoding when creating an instance of lxml parser doesn't work on production. See code.google.com/p/googleappengine/issues/detail?id=7315 . So it seems there are a couple of bugs regarding lxml. –  Maxim May 17 '12 at 8:18
    
@Maxim I'm aware of that issue (thanks for reporting it). But as far as I can tell, while 'cp1251' and 'iso-8859-2' don't work, 'utf-8' or 'iso-8859-1' work fine. So my work-around should still work in production (at least it does for me). –  mgiuca May 17 '12 at 8:37
    
Thanks for your answer. I just findout that if I don't clean the code before parse, everything is fine. # cleaner = Cleaner(page_structure = False) # htmlsource = cleaner.clean_html(urllib2.urlopen("http://www.verycd.com/").read()) –  qazplm 4ever May 17 '12 at 10:26
    
@qazplm4ever I don't see how not cleaning it is going to help. You've still got Unicode characters that aren't going to parse correctly. Also, don't you want to clean the HTML? It seems like by commenting out cleaning, you're not attacking the problem. –  mgiuca May 18 '12 at 1:22
    
Oh, the reason it fixes the problem is because if you don't clean the HTML, it includes <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />. So that will work (but not for all web pages). I recommend that you clean it and use my solution instead. –  mgiuca May 18 '12 at 5:09

Here is the most basic rules for dealing with text:

  1. Decode the text into unicode as soon as you read it (you are doing this)
  2. Do all of your processing in unicode (you are doing this)
  3. Encode the text right before output. You are not doing this.

Add an encode to your print statement and you should be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Encode the text still output the same result. Actually, because I've changed the system default encoding to utf-8, so encode before output is not needed. –  qazplm 4ever May 16 '12 at 7:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.