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I have several hashes

hash1 = { :c1234 => 0.7, :c1237 => 0.8, :c1634 => 0.6, :c1224 => 0.3, :c1291 => 0.1 }
hash2 = { :c1234 => 0.5, :c1136 => 0.2, :c1634 => 0.7, :c1524 => 0.1, :c2291 => 0.9, :c2391 => 0.7 }
hash3 = { :c1234 => 0.3, :c1136 => 0.4, :c6321 => 0.5 }

I need to create matrix from these hashes like

numhash c1234 c1237 c1634 c1224 c1291 c1136 c1524 c2291 c2391 c6321
hash1     0.7   0.8   0.6   0.3   0.1     0     0     0     0     0
hash2     0.5     0   0.7     0     0   0.2   0.1   0.9   0.7     0
hash3     0.3     0     0     0     0   0.4     0     0     0   0.5

numhash = 3 (number of hashes)

Please help me to do it in Ruby.

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That is not valid Ruby code. Do you mean something like: hash1 = { :c1234=>0.7,:c1237=>0.8,:c1634=>0.6,:c1224=>0.3,:c1291=>0.1 }? What are your real data structures? –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 15:12
    
Hey sorry, my way of hash writing is wrong. But, I meant the same which you commented :). Thanks for your notification. –  Palani Kannan May 15 '12 at 15:18
    
@Matt Well, not really; the hashes are not ordered, and some of them hold more valies than others. See my answer for a solution if you can slightly change your data storage. –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 15:24
    
@PalaniKannan To be clear, you are talking about printed output, correct, not providing 2D access to the data? (And, BTW, is this a homework question?) –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 15:27
    
Does the ordering of the columns in the result matter? –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should store your hashes not in many local variables, but instead in an enumerable collection, like an Array or Hash. For example, using a hash to name each hash "row":

data = {
  h1:     {c1234:0.7,c1237:0.8,c1634:0.6,c1224:0.3,c1291:0.1},
  cats:   {c1234:0.5,c1136:0.2,c1634:0.7,c1524:0.1,c2291:0.9,c2391:0.7},
  kittens:{c1234:0.3,c1136:0.4,c6321:0.5}
}

def print_grid(data)
  cols     = data.values.flat_map(&:keys).uniq.sort
  head     = data.keys.map(&:length).max
  template = "%#{head}s | #{cols.map{ |c| "%#{c.length}s" }.join(' | ')}"
  puts template % [ "", *cols ]
  data.each do |row,pairs|
    values = cols.map{ |col| pairs[col] || 0.0 }
    puts template % [ row, *values ]
  end
  puts "", "numhashes: #{data.length}"
end

print_grid(data)    
#=>         | c1136 | c1224 | c1234 | c1237 | c1291 | c1524 | c1634 | c2291 | c2391 | c6321
#=>      h1 |   0.0 |   0.3 |   0.7 |   0.8 |   0.1 |   0.0 |   0.6 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.0
#=>    cats |   0.2 |   0.0 |   0.5 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.1 |   0.7 |   0.9 |   0.7 |   0.0
#=> kittens |   0.4 |   0.0 |   0.3 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.0 |   0.5
#=> 
#=> numhashes: 3

If you change the last map to...

values = columns.map{ |col| pairs[col] || "-" }

then you get:

        | c1136 | c1224 | c1234 | c1237 | c1291 | c1524 | c1634 | c2291 | c2391 | c6321
     h1 |     - |   0.3 |   0.7 |   0.8 |   0.1 |     - |   0.6 |     - |     - |     -
   cats |   0.2 |     - |   0.5 |     - |     - |   0.1 |   0.7 |   0.9 |   0.7 |     -
kittens |   0.4 |     - |   0.3 |     - |     - |     - |     - |     - |     - |   0.5
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Thanks lot @Phragz for wonderful answer –  Palani Kannan May 15 '12 at 16:16
hash1 = {:c1234 => 0.7, :c1237 => 0.8, :c1634 => 0.6, :c1224 => 0.3, :c1291 => 0.1} 
hash2 = {:c1234 => 0.5, :c1136 => 0.2, :c1634 => 0.7, :c1524 => 0.1, :c2291 => 0.9, :c2391 => 0.7}
hash3 = {:c1234 => 0.3, :c1136 => 0.4, :c6321 => 0.5}

all_hashes = [hash1, hash2, hash3]
all_keys = all_hashes.flat_map(&:keys).uniq

puts "#{all_hashes.length}\t#{all_keys.join("\t")}"
all_hashes.each_with_index do | hash, i |
  puts "hash#{i}\t#{all_keys.map { | k | hash[k]}.join("\t")}"
end
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for providing a tab-delimited alternative suitable for copy/pasting into Excel. :) –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 15:30
1  
FWIW, under Ruby 1.9.2+ you can do: all_keys = all_hashes.flat_map(&:keys).uniq –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 15:32
    
@Phrogz: Cool, thanks. –  undur_gongor May 15 '12 at 15:37
    
How would this work if you have a Hash with Array pairs as keys, i.e, {[0,0] => 5, ...} –  Trevor Alexander Dec 13 '13 at 3:19
1  
@TrevorAlexander: It will kind-of work. The all_keys.join("\t"), however, will join the inner arrays with tabs too. So the output would have two column headers per key. To avoid this, you could do join the inner arrays differently all_keys.map { | k | k.join(', ') }.join("\t"). –  undur_gongor Dec 13 '13 at 9:40

Try

numhash = { :hash1 => { :c1234=>0.7,:c1237=>0.8,:c1634=>0.6,:c1224=>0.3,:c1291=>0.1 }, :hash2 => { :c1234 => 0.5, :c1136 => 0.2, :c1634 => 0.7, :c1524 => 0.1, :c2291 => 0.9, :c2391 => 0.7} }

and so on... Then you can access value through numhash[:hash1][:c1237], for example.

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