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index.php contains links in this style:

<a href="index.php?id=1">1</a>
<a href="index.php?id=2">2</a>

and then a PHP passage in this style:

if ($_GET["id"] == "1") {}
elseif ($_GET["id"] == "2") {}

So when a link is clicked, the page is reloaded, and one of the if/elseif blocks is run.

However, when I load index.php the first time I get this error: Undefined index: id

I guess this means that $_GET["id"] needs to have a default value. But where do I put this default value in my code? If I give it, for example, the value "0" in the beginning of the script, the code blocks will never run, since the value keeps being reset on every reload.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can first check to see if it has been set:

if (isset($_GET["id"])) {

    if ($_GET["id"] == "1") {

    } elseif ($_GET["id"] == "2") {

    }

}

isset is a language construct which will not issue any errors if the variable isn't set.

empty also won't issue errors but also checks for a "non-empty" value.

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Out of interest, is there any cost difference between the two functions if we don't mind if it is checking "non-empty" values or not? –  Adam Thornton May 15 '12 at 15:57
    
No appreciable difference. –  webbiedave May 15 '12 at 16:10
    
Thanks @webbiedave. I appreciate the info about isset and empty not issuing errors. You're missing a ) on line 1, though. :) –  Johanna May 15 '12 at 16:14
    
Thanks, Johanna. I've fixed the missing parenthesis. –  webbiedave May 15 '12 at 16:39

First, ignore the answers which advise you to set default value. That is not required and is atrocious design. Check if the value is present before checking it.

I would advise against using else/elseif chains. As your links increase, so does the ugliness of your code. Use a switch:

if(isset($_GET['id'])){

  switch($_GET['id']){
    case 1:
      // code
      break;
    case 2:
      // code
      break;
  }

}
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Thanks, Damien. Nice tips about not needing to set a default value and about the switch. –  Johanna May 16 '12 at 7:50
1  
@aj: you edited my question for grammar, and changed 'value is' to 'value are'. Please don't edit people's questions unless you understand English yourself. –  Damien Roche May 16 '12 at 13:33

One solution is to check if $_GET['id'] is empty, if so then set to be 0.

if(empty($_GET['id']))
{
    $_GET['id'] = 0;
}
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Try:

if (!isset($_GET["id"])) { $_GET["id"] = "0" }

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The first time you load a page, it won't have any query parameters.

You should wrap the conditions inside another condition that checks for the existence of id:

if (isset($_GET['id'])) {
    // you can use switch or keep the ifelseif chain
    switch ($_GET['id']) {
        case 1:
            // do stuff with 1
            break;

        case 2:
            // do stuff with 2
            break;
    }
}
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Replace

if ($_GET["id"] == "1") {}

with

if (isset($_GET['id']) && $_GET['id']==1){} 
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$id = (isset($_GET['id'])) ? $_GET['id'] : null;

if ($id == "1") {}
} elseif ($id == "2") {}
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