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using either bash or python (2.4.x)

I have a file - about 100 or so lines in the file and the file is structured like this.

aaaaa,  100
aaaab,  75
aaaac,  150
aaaad,  135
aaaae,  144
aaaaf,  12
aaaag,  5
aaaah,  34
aaaai,  11
aaaaj,  43
aaaak,  88
aaaal,  3
baaaa,  25
baaab,  33
baaac,  87
baaad,  111
baaae,  45
baaaf,  99
baaag,  71
baaah,  68
baaai,  168
baaaj,  21
baaak,  11
baaal,  47
caaaa,  59
caaab,  85
caaac,  77
caaad,  33
caaae,  44
caaaf,  16
caaag,  111
caaah,  141
caaai,  87
caaaj,  59
caaak,  89
caaal,  3

and what I want to do is divide it into 12 columns, with each column having roughly the same number of sensors and the sum of each column being close to the same.

In other words if I took the above list and split it like this.

aaaaa   100     aaaab   75      baaab   33
aaaai   11      baaah   68      baaac   87
aaaak   88      caaaa   59      caaac   77
       199             202              197

aaaah   34      baaaf   99      caaad   33
baaad   111     baaal   47      aaaac   150
aaaaj   43      caaae   44      caaaf   16
       188             190              199

aaaag   5       aaaaf   12      baaaa   25
aaaad   135     caaai   87      caaag   111
caaaa   59      caaak   89      baaag   71
       199                 188          207

aaaae   144     baaaj   21      caaaj   59
aaaal   3       baaak   11      caaah   141
baaae   45      baaai   168     caaal   3
       192              200              203

it makes 12 columns of equal items and pretty close to even value.

I can do it manually but we will end up needing to do this a few times. I'm not even sure where to start with it other than make it into an array, counting the items in the array and do a random split. still stuck on the value leveling though.

Any pointers?

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1  
Is Python 2.4 a strict requirement? –  rubik May 15 '12 at 16:07
    
12 columns? You mean 12 groups. I see 3 columns there. –  rubik May 15 '12 at 16:19
    
yeah sorry 12 columns, I layered it to save space. and yes on 2.4 for Python unfortunately –  Chasester May 15 '12 at 16:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not going to be fun for large inputs if you want an optimal solution. You're looking at something that's right in line with some very famous hard problems in CS - Knapsack, Bin Packing and the like. Some simpler, less perfect, solutions might be close enough.

It's not exact but, given your example data-set I managed to get sizes of 214, 197, 194, 199, 205, 182, 195, 192, 199, 199, 206, 208 from a very simple method. It may or may not work with real data.

Method is :

  1. Sort list by magnitude
  2. Split list into 3 parts - High, Medium and Low
  3. Put each member of high in a set.
  4. Reverse medium and low lists.
  5. Put them (in reversed order) into the existing sets

Solutions can get significantly more complex as you get closer to optimal partitioning.

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1  
Split the list into listlength / 12 parts. Otherwise, this is the type of solution I had in mind. +1 –  Dennis Williamson May 15 '12 at 16:45
    
Good catch. It's early & I misinterpreted the specifics of the problem statement. –  Sean McSomething May 15 '12 at 16:47
1  
The need to reverse the low set depends on the distribution of the values. Sometimes it might be better not to reverse it (if the large jumps in values occur in the middle set). –  Rhand May 15 '12 at 16:53
    
right right, i'm going to plug at it here for a bit. –  Chasester May 16 '12 at 14:47

Interesting problem, I think you are stuck with quite a time costly process to find the best solution. You can calculate the number of items per split and the average value they should have. Sort the items on the integer and take the biggest number while the value is still below the average, then repeat this process until you only need to add one more item, now pick the smallest and try to get as close to the average as you can (over or under does not matter).

If at any step except the latest you get stuck (e.g. value > average) go back and pick the next biggest.

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1  
I did not post an implementation, but I'd suggest python with a dictionary instead of bash. –  Rhand May 15 '12 at 16:10

I wrote two very simple implementations. The first one uses a deque to pop both from right and from left (once the list is sorted) to place the low values with the high ones. The second one is the one @Sean McSomething suggested.

Here is the code (quick'n'dirty -- with few comments unfortunately):

import math
import itertools
import collections


def sum_column(data):
    return sum(zip(*data)[1], 0.0)


def split_groups(sensors):
    sensors.sort(key=lambda item: item[1], reverse=True)
    per_group = len(sensors) // 12
    average = sum_column(sensors) / len(sensors)
    data = collections.deque(sensors)
    groups = [[] for i in xrange(12)]
    cycle = itertools.cycle(groups)
    try:
        while True:
            current = cycle.next()
            if len(current) == per_group - 1:
                if sum_column(current) < average:
                    current.append(data.popleft())
                else:
                    current.append(data.pop())
                continue
            current.append(data.popleft())
            current.append(data.pop())
    except IndexError:
        return groups


def split_groups2(sensors):
    sensors.sort(key=lambda item: item[1], reverse=True)
    groups = [[] for i in xrange(12)]
    cycle = itertools.cycle(groups)
    per_group = int(math.ceil(len(sensors) / 3.))
    partitions = [sensors[i:i + per_group] for i in xrange(0, len(sensors)
                                                           per_group)]
    medium, low = map(reversed, partitions[1:])
    for sensor, value in itertools.chain(partitions[0], medium, low):
        cycle.next().append((sensor, value))
    return groups


def format_groups(result):
    ret = []
    for group in result:
        tmp = []
        tmp.append('\n'.join('{0}   {1}'.format(k, v) for k, v in group))
        tmp.append(' ' * 8 + str(int(sum_column(group))))
        ret.append('\n'.join(tmp))
    return '\n\n'.join(ret)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys

    implementation = split_groups
    if '--second' in sys.argv:
        sys.argv.remove('--second')
        implementation = split_groups2

    with open(sys.argv[1]) as fobj:
        sensors = []
        for line in fobj:
            sensor, value = line.strip().split(',  ')
            sensors.append((sensor, int(value)))
        sys.stdout.write(format_groups(split_groups(sensors)))
        sys.stdout.write('\n')

In a Gist too:
https://gist.github.com/2703965

I left the easy part (formatting) up to you. For now it simply prints them vertically (and not orizontally how you requested). It should not be too difficult.

This is the best it can achieve (with both the implementations):

(max(sums) - min(sums)) / 2. = 16.0

Which is far from the example but it is a start. You can launch it from the commandline with the filename and optionally a --second switch (to use the second implementation). I could use a command line parser but I am used to argparse, which is not present in Python 2.4. So I just went for that awkward hack.

Example run:

$ python2 groupit.py filename.txt
baaai   168
caaal   3
aaaaj   43
        214

aaaac   150
aaaal   3
caaae   44
        197

aaaae   144
aaaag   5
baaae   45
        194

caaah   141
baaak   11
baaal   47
        199

aaaad   135
aaaai   11
caaaj   59
        205

baaad   111
aaaaf   12
caaaa   59
        182

caaag   111
caaaf   16
baaah   68
        195

aaaaa   100
baaaj   21
baaag   71
        192

baaaf   99
baaaa   25
aaaab   75
        199

caaak   89
caaad   33
caaac   77
        199

aaaak   88
baaab   33
caaab   85
        206

baaac   87
aaaah   34
caaai   87
        208
$ python2 groupit.py --second filename.txt
baaai   168
caaal   3
aaaaj   43
        214

aaaac   150
aaaal   3
caaae   44
        197

aaaae   144
aaaag   5
baaae   45
        194

caaah   141
baaak   11
baaal   47
        199

aaaad   135
aaaai   11
caaaj   59
        205

baaad   111
aaaaf   12
caaaa   59
        182

caaag   111
caaaf   16
baaah   68
        195

aaaaa   100
baaaj   21
baaag   71
        192

baaaf   99
baaaa   25
aaaab   75
        199

caaak   89
caaad   33
caaac   77
        199

aaaak   88
baaab   33
caaab   85
        206

baaac   87
aaaah   34
caaai   87
        208

With the example in the question the two algorithm give the very same answer. If you could provide more test cases I would try to improve them. I tested the script on Python 2.7, since I do not have a 2.4 installed.
Sorry for the long answer.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you - yeah I see what you're saying. I ran into a few issues with the 2.4 vs 2.7 bit (like the formatting) but I was able to print the group's out to the screen to get what you're saying. working on it. –  Chasester May 16 '12 at 14:47

Here is what I came up with thus far. I think it's pretty close, and without the really high value's offsetting things a bit - well it's close.

happy to hear any suggestions to make it more pythonic.

file: columnsplit.py

#!/usr/bin/python
import sys, operator

# usage
# columnsplit.py <filename> <#cols>
# columnsplit.py test.csv 12
#

#determine number of devices per column
def devicelisting(fulllist,percolumn):
  devicelist=[]
  fobj=open(fulllist,'r')
  for line in fobj:
    (key, val) = line.split(',')
    devicelist.append((key,int(val)))
  devicespercol=(len(devicelist)/int(percolumn))
  return(devicelist,devicespercol)

def devicesplit(fulllist,numcolumns,roundnum):
  if roundnum == 0:
    devices=sorted(fulllist, key=lambda device: device[1], reverse=True)
    devicestemp=devices
  else:
    devices=sorted(fulllist, key=lambda device: device[1])
    devicestemp=devices
  deviceslice=[]
  for idx, val in zip(range(numcolumns), devices):
    deviceslice.append(val)
    devicestemp.remove(val)
  return(deviceslice,devicestemp)

def makecolumns(roundnumber,percol):
  column=[]
  for i in range(percol):
    exec('tempslice=deviceslice%s' % i)
    column.append(tempslice[roundnumber])
  return(column)

# what this is going to do is generate how many devices will fill each of the intended
# number of columns.  What is left over will be run again against the lowest value of columns

if __name__ == '__main__':
  tempslice=[]
  devices,percol=devicelisting(sys.argv[1],sys.argv[2])
  # devices is the devices/value as tuples nested in a list
  # percol is going to be how many devices per column
  # you can len(devices) to count how many devices we have

  # prints out the device list in reverse.
  # print sorted(devices, key=lambda x: x[1], reverse=True)

  # what we will need to do here is split the device list into number of desired slices.  i.e. if we want 12 columns
  # and we have 108 devices there should be 9 slices of 12.
  # this will leave a remaining slice - of less than 9 which will be added to the 12 columns in order of smallest column first

  devicesleft=devices
  numcolumns=int(sys.argv[2])
  for i in range(percol):
    sendcol,devicesleft=devicesplit(devicesleft,numcolumns,i)
    exec('deviceslice%s=sendcol' % i)
# and finally create the columns
  for i in range(0,numcolumns):
    sendcol=makecolumns(i,percol)
    exec('column%s=sendcol' % i)

  # add the left over devices
  j=numcolumns
  # sort remaining reverse.
  devices=sorted(devicesleft, key=lambda device: device[1], reverse=True)
  for i in range(len(devices)):
    j-=1
    exec('column%s.append(devices[i])' % j)

  # prints out the resulting columns
  for i in range(0,numcolumns):
    exec('tempcol=column%s' % i)
    print tempcol
    print sum([pair[1] for pair in tempcol])

The test file I ran it across.

file: test44a.csv

SQCIEOEO,1272
HIKTXYZH,281
JZHRZXKX,5793
UBGTOLUX,147
WBVYFNBN,9
VMHTKHBU,32
GILGFWDA,1334
YKUMWOKT,2066
PFSVTUIP,51
GPJRWKMD,673
TYJZUNZS,27
XTFUHPNX,2102
VFSPABFG,65
ROYOZKRS,189
IARDNRVL,587
LBFSQTQL,973
ZJBZKGFB,21301
UEPUOHMW,20
HEAVWVGH,0
XMANFQZE,719
ZADKGIMB,82
NCVBJIYR,27
NYMJUSQR,20646
EQFKHEOH,2050
ERRLAENN,19
HIPRQNIE,12557
MVNHODYT,20
UEDBIRIN,14
JAZJEMXL,28
UMDLALPN,36
GCUUGTNA,0
XRCGIKTR,12
KSBPEYBZ,20657
LELLPAYW,43792
DTRKMFLK,73
WNQEXJWI,41
CYXHXYHI,10
CSUSTTOX,120
NFHZLSJH,23
FAMDKJLM,25
HIUEHBNJ,261
UIBNCQKP,40
WSPHKYOQ,30025
ZBUJKFWR,0
OQWVSKFM,49
SHZUXKKU,21
CZBMYQDX,45
RXGBCCTR,17
SPMLASXS,15
ZWNXGXRI,59
WTVUJZSB,22
WYDZBWQU,19100
MDFMVCFV,6133
ZSSGQJPM,25
CKHMJZOG,85
YRFZOWTB,28
AYNWBSRA,14
LJGBTVOW,13110
GWJPWXWU,16
PCUDYNEY,179
MSVNLMOX,62
WUYPPNMW,2285
KVLGTIBI,11
KWMIKQHW,11
JDKUPYRM,1851
DARXQYDY,68
UUPXIDEP,139
SKQZMTFY,4377
ZEPOWAEA,189
BWXRVAPP,167
VFMDIRTA,561
BKANEGMD,2122
LBRICWID,1775
TGVOGLDC,3650
QQGZHAAJ,81
KAXPHJSS,122
LKAOHISA,32
ONOVZSYQ,41
IEPQEPZP,62
QWEXGXQS,0
IQGPZYQO,15
MEJLXIBG,10
MRWRHWHX,10
TMVAJLSS,57
BYIAXYOJ,173
DYUAGWGT,248
ODLVZSST,21
EOTOZLHA,6476
KPBHOQQR,30
OLSVIYOW,539
CZSCSLVX,17
ZPMYBTZL,11
IATWRKOF,12507
WGBEFQBH,41
PUJIFEFE,382
TSDULCGU,9070
DARUKFAG,209
MBLRRNYH,250
IIQNNWSG,25
OWBZYIUC,1808
ILXTRXZD,2012
ZLVRZUYH,269
CPVPLOWZ,108
KYZJGTMO,635
EJHWGHZG,25
TUXTOWBR,11
LXGXLCWW,2313
AVFHPRWT,915
AEPHMPNF,32
KLZZHAQT,56
XWQJZNFA,611
JKHYCDSC,1455

command to run it: python columnsplit.py test44a 12 (the 12 being number of desired columns).

Sample output columns with value of column first.:

1) 45577 [('LELLPAYW', 43792), ('HEAVWVGH', 0), ('XRCGIKTR', 12), ('ODLVZSST', 21), ('VMHTKHBU', 32), ('TMVAJLSS', 57), ('KAXPHJSS', 122), ('ZLVRZUYH', 269), ('SQCIEOEO', 1272)]

2) 31906 [('WSPHKYOQ', 30025), ('GCUUGTNA', 0), ('UEDBIRIN', 14), ('WTVUJZSB', 22), ('LKAOHISA', 32), ('ZWNXGXRI', 59), ('UUPXIDEP', 139), ('HIKTXYZH', 281), ('GILGFWDA', 1334)]

3) 23416 [('ZJBZKGFB', 21301), ('ZBUJKFWR', 0), ('AYNWBSRA', 14), ('NFHZLSJH', 23), ('AEPHMPNF', 32), ('MSVNLMOX', 62), ('UBGTOLUX', 147), ('PUJIFEFE', 382), ('JKHYCDSC', 1455)]

4) 23276 [('KSBPEYBZ', 20657), ('QWEXGXQS', 0), ('SPMLASXS', 15), ('FAMDKJLM', 25), ('UMDLALPN', 36), ('IEPQEPZP', 62), ('BWXRVAPP', 167), ('OLSVIYOW', 539), ('LBRICWID', 1775)]

5) 23342 [('NYMJUSQR', 20646), ('WBVYFNBN', 9), ('IQGPZYQO', 15), ('ZSSGQJPM', 25), ('UIBNCQKP', 40), ('VFSPABFG', 65), ('BYIAXYOJ', 173), ('VFMDIRTA', 561), ('OWBZYIUC', 1808)]

6) 21877 [('WYDZBWQU', 19100), ('CYXHXYHI', 10), ('GWJPWXWU', 16), ('IIQNNWSG', 25), ('WNQEXJWI', 41), ('DARXQYDY', 68), ('PCUDYNEY', 179), ('IARDNRVL', 587), ('JDKUPYRM', 1851)]

7) 16088 [('LJGBTVOW', 13110), ('MEJLXIBG', 10), ('RXGBCCTR', 17), ('EJHWGHZG', 25), ('ONOVZSYQ', 41), ('DTRKMFLK', 73), ('ROYOZKRS', 189), ('XWQJZNFA', 611), ('ILXTRXZD', 2012)]

8) 15607 [('HIPRQNIE', 12557), ('MRWRHWHX', 10), ('CZSCSLVX', 17), ('TYJZUNZS', 27), ('WGBEFQBH', 41), ('QQGZHAAJ', 81), ('ZEPOWAEA', 189), ('KYZJGTMO', 635), ('EQFKHEOH', 2050)]

9) 17952 [('IATWRKOF', 12507), ('KVLGTIBI', 11), ('ERRLAENN', 19), ('NCVBJIYR', 27), ('CZBMYQDX', 45), ('ZADKGIMB', 82), ('DARUKFAG', 209), ('GPJRWKMD', 673), ('YKUMWOKT', 2066), ('LXGXLCWW', 2313)]

10) 15982 [('TSDULCGU', 9070), ('KWMIKQHW', 11), ('UEPUOHMW', 20), ('JAZJEMXL', 28), ('OQWVSKFM', 49), ('CKHMJZOG', 85), ('DYUAGWGT', 248), ('XMANFQZE', 719), ('XTFUHPNX', 2102), ('TGVOGLDC', 3650)]

11) 14358 [('EOTOZLHA', 6476), ('ZPMYBTZL', 11), ('MVNHODYT', 20), ('YRFZOWTB', 28), ('PFSVTUIP', 51), ('CPVPLOWZ', 108), ('MBLRRNYH', 250), ('AVFHPRWT', 915), ('BKANEGMD', 2122), ('SKQZMTFY', 4377)]

12) 15683 [('MDFMVCFV', 6133), ('TUXTOWBR', 11), ('SHZUXKKU', 21), ('KPBHOQQR', 30), ('KLZZHAQT', 56), ('CSUSTTOX', 120), ('HIUEHBNJ', 261), ('LBFSQTQL', 973), ('WUYPPNMW', 2285), ('JZHRZXKX', 5793)]
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