Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have std::tuple<double, double, double> (where the type is homogeneous), is there a stock function or constructor to convert to std::array<double>?

Edit:: I was able to get it working with recursive template code (my draft answer posted below). Is this the best way to handle this? It seems like there would be a stock function for this... Or if you have improvements to my answer, I'd appreciate it. I'll leave the question unanswered (after all, I want a good way, not just a workable way), and would prefer to select someone else's [hopefully better] answer.

Thanks for your advice.

share|improve this question
1  
You're right, there is a way to generally unpack tuples without making use of recursion (which would work for your problem). However we don't have a generic answer that outlines the technique. In any case I wrote you an example. –  Luc Danton May 16 '12 at 8:58
    
If you use something like std::common_type, you could drop the homogeneous-tuple requirement. Strip the reference and cv-qualifier parts of each tuple element type before passing them to common_type. –  CTMacUser Apr 29 '13 at 9:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Converting a tuple to an array without making use of recursion, including use of perfect-forwarding (useful for move-only types):

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <array>

template<int... Indices>
struct indices {
    using next = indices<Indices..., sizeof...(Indices)>;
};

template<int Size>
struct build_indices {
    using type = typename build_indices<Size - 1>::type::next;
};

template<>
struct build_indices<0> {
    using type = indices<>;
};

template<typename T>
using Bare = typename std::remove_cv<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type>::type;

template<typename Tuple>
constexpr
typename build_indices<std::tuple_size<Bare<Tuple>>::value>::type
make_indices()
{ return {}; }

template<typename Tuple, int... Indices>
std::array<
  typename std::tuple_element<0, Bare<Tuple>>::type,
    std::tuple_size<Bare<Tuple>>::value
>
to_array(Tuple&& tuple, indices<Indices...>)
{
    using std::get;
    return {{ get<Indices>(std::forward<Tuple>(tuple))... }};
}

template<typename Tuple>
auto to_array(Tuple&& tuple)
-> decltype( to_array(std::declval<Tuple>(), make_indices<Tuple>()) )
{
    return to_array(std::forward<Tuple>(tuple), make_indices<Tuple>());
}

int main() {
  std::tuple<double, double, double> tup(1.5, 2.5, 4.5);
  auto arr = to_array(tup);
  for (double x : arr)
    std::cout << x << " ";
  std::cout << std::endl;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Index arrays are exactly the kind of thing that I am looking for-- a sort of "for each" framework for std::tuple. I proposed a couple edits to your answer (I fixed a few compilation errors when compiled on with g++-4.7 -std=c++11 and added a main). Thanks a lot for the answer. –  Oliver May 20 '12 at 17:29
    
@Luc - this is very hard code to decipher. I would appreciate some explanation. one easy question: why are you using std::declval<Tuple>(), instead of simply tuple? –  Uri Oct 16 '12 at 16:31
    
@Uri The Tuple may not be default constructible, in which case Tuple {} is an error but std::declval<Tuple>() isn't. I suggest you look around for explanations about std::declval -- its use is frequent in this kind of generic code, but isn't really crucial to the actual functionality present here. –  Luc Danton Oct 16 '12 at 21:46
    
There is now a std::make_index_sequence that makes this job a little easier. It might be worth updating this answer using it. –  Andrew Tomazos May 17 '14 at 5:26

You can do it non-recursively:

#include <array>
#include <tuple>
#include <redi/index_tuple.h>  // see below

template<typename T, typename... U>
  using Array = std::array<T, 1+sizeof...(U)>;

template<typename T, typename... U, unsigned... I>
  inline Array<T, U...>
  tuple_to_array2(const std::tuple<T, U...>& t, redi::index_tuple<I...>)
  {
    return Array<T, U...>{ std::get<I>(t)... };
  }

template<typename T, typename... U>
  inline Array<T, U...>
  tuple_to_array(const std::tuple<T, U...>& t)
  {
    using IndexTuple = typename redi::make_index_tuple<1+sizeof...(U)>::type;
    return tuple_to_array2(t, IndexTuple());
  }

See http://gitorious.org/redistd/redistd/blobs/master/include/redi/index_tuple.h for my implementation of index_tuple, something like that is useful for working with tuples and similar variadic templates.

share|improve this answer

I would return the array instead of populating it by reference, so that auto can be used to make the callsite cleaner:

template<typename First, typename... Rem>
std::array<First, 1+sizeof...(Rem)>
fill_array_from_tuple(const std::tuple<First, Rem...>& t) {
  std::array<First, 1+sizeof...(Rem)> arr;
  ArrayFiller<First, decltype(t), 1+sizeof...(Rem)>::fill_array_from_tuple(t, arr);
  return arr;
}

// ...

std::tuple<double, double, double> tup(0.1, 0.2, 0.3);
auto arr = fill_array_from_tuple(tup);

Realistically, NRVO will eliminate most performance concerns.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good point re NRVO. I sometimes forget that compilers are that smart. –  Oliver May 20 '12 at 15:11
#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <array>

template<class First, class Tuple, std::size_t N, std::size_t K = N>
struct ArrayFiller {
  static void fill_array_from_tuple(const Tuple& t, std::array<First, N> & arr) {
    ArrayFiller<First, Tuple, N, K-1>::fill_array_from_tuple(t, arr);
    arr[K-1] = std::get<K-1>(t);
  }
};

template<class First, class Tuple, std::size_t N>
struct ArrayFiller<First, Tuple, N, 1> {
  static void fill_array_from_tuple( const Tuple& t, std::array<First, N> & arr) {
    arr[0] = std::get<0>(t);
  }
};

template<typename First, typename... Rem>
void fill_array_from_tuple(const std::tuple<First, Rem...>& t, std::array<First, 1+sizeof...(Rem)> & arr) {
  ArrayFiller<First, decltype(t), 1+sizeof...(Rem)>::fill_array_from_tuple(t, arr);
}

int main() {
  std::tuple<double, double, double> tup(0.1, 0.2, 0.3);
  std::array<double, 3> arr;
  fill_array_from_tuple(tup, arr);

  for (double x : arr)
    std::cout << x << " ";
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.