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From (Twitter format example)

Tue, 15 May 2012 15:40:34 +0000

to (ISO format example)

2005-12-01T13:45:00

using XSLT


Here's an XML snippet

<item>
     <title>It's called "Kangaroo Care" - what parents can do to create a special bond and improve the health of their newborns: http://t.co/8MV8FpM4</title>
        <link>http://twitter.com/ProvHealth/statuses/202423233104973826</link>
        <description>It's called "Kangaroo Care" - what parents can do to create a special bond and improve the health of their newborns: &lt;a href="http://t.co/8MV8FpM4"&gt;http://t.co/8MV8FpM4&lt;/a&gt;</description>
     <pubDate>Tue, 15 May 2012 15:40:34 +0000</pubDate>
        <guid>http://twitter.com/ProvHealth/statuses/202423233104973826</guid>
        <author>ProvHealth@twitter.com (Providence Oregon)</author>
     <media:content type="image/jpg" height="48" width="48" url="http://a0.twimg.com/profile_images/748948431/cross_normal.png"/>
     <google:image_link>http://a0.twimg.com/profile_images/748948431/cross_normal.png</google:image_link>
        <twitter:metadata>
         <twitter:result_type>recent</twitter:result_type>
     </twitter:metadata>
 </item>
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1  
You need to say whether you need an XSLT 1.0 or 2.0 solution. –  Michael Kay May 15 '12 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's some ideas about how to approach this.

  1. you can do substring wrangling like in this example: Format a date in XML via XSLT. You will likely have to create yourself a few "enumerables" for days of the week and months.

  2. XPath 2.0 gives you XSD types constructor functions and you can get some help from these on top of substring wrangling.

  3. if your transformer supports EXSLT you can go with the date/time extension functions.

  4. EXSLT also has regular expression support which you can use to parse the twitter date into chunks for further conversion into the ISO date.

  5. you can write a custom extension function in whatever technology you use to drive your XSLT to run the conversion for you.

With that said, there's no one-function "easy" way to accomplish what you need in XSLT.

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This converts d/m/yyyy hh:mm:ss AM to ISO date. No time on this yet, but it would be a continuation of this. The fact that the day and month could be one character or two complicated it.

  <!--Convert from 'd/m/yyyy hh:mm:ss AM' to YYYY-MM-DD-->
  <xsl:template name="ISODate">
    <xsl:param name="Date" />
    <xsl:param name="Year" />
    <xsl:param name="Month" />
    <xsl:param name="Day" />

    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="not($Month)">
        <xsl:call-template name="ISODate">
          <xsl:with-param name="Month" select="substring(concat('0',substring-before($Date,'/')), string-length(concat('0',substring-before($Date,'/'))) - 1, 2)" />
          <xsl:with-param name="Date" select="substring-after($Date,'/')" />
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:when test="not($Day)">
        <xsl:call-template name="ISODate">
          <xsl:with-param name="Month" select="$Month" />
          <xsl:with-param name="Day" select="substring(concat('0',substring-before($Date,'/')), string-length(concat('0',substring-before($Date,'/'))) - 1, 2)" />
          <xsl:with-param name="Date" select="substring-after($Date,'/')" />
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:when test="not($Year)">
        <xsl:call-template name="ISODate">
          <xsl:with-param name="Month" select="$Month" />
          <xsl:with-param name="Day" select="$Day" />
          <xsl:with-param name="Year" select="substring-before($Date,' ')" />
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="concat($Year,'-',$Month,'-',$Day)"/>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
  </xsl:template>
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