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Hopefully this is just something small im doing wrong as these are some of my first threaded scripts using queues. Basically after running through it stops and sits there but wont exit.

import threading
import Queue
class Words(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.queue = Queue.Queue()     

    def word(self):
        read = open('words.txt')
        for word in read:
            word = word.replace("\n","")
            self.queue.put(word)       
        read.close() 
        for i in range(5):
            t = self.run()
            t.setDaemon(True)
            t.start()  
        self.queue.join()

    def run(self): 
        while True:
            word = self.queue.get()
            print word 
            self.queue.task_done()

    if __name__ == '__main__':
        Word =  Words()
        Word.word()
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So, in this code, you're trying to spin up 5 threads to process all items in the queue? –  Brendan Wood May 15 '12 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

You are using threads incorrectly in a couple of ways in your code:

First, the code seems to be built on the incorrect assumption that the one Thread subclass object you have can spawn all of the threads you need to do the work. On the contrary, the Thread documentation says that start "must be called at most once per Thread object". In the case of the word method, this is the self reference.

However, it would not be useful to call self.start() because that would spawn a single thread to consume the queue, and you would gain nothing from threading. Since word would have to construct new instances of Words anyway to initiate multiple threads, and the queue object will need to be accessed by multiple Words instances, it would be useful to have both of those separate from the Words object. For example, word could be a function outside of the Words object that starts like:

def word():
    queue = Queue.Queue()
    read = open('words.txt')
    for word in read:
        word = word.replace("\n","")
        self.put(word)       
    read.close()
    #...

This would also mean that Words would have to take the queue object as a parameter so that multiple instances would share the same queue:

class Words(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, queue):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue

Second, your thread function (run) is an infinite loop, so the thread will never terminate. Since you are only running the queue consumer threads after you have added all items to the queue, you should not have a problem terminating the thread once the queue is empty, like so:

def run(self): 
    while True:
        try:
            word = self.queue.get(False)
        except Queue.Empty:
            break
        print word 
        self.queue.task_done()

It is useful to use exceptions here because otherwise the queue could empty out and then the thread could try to get from it and it would end up waiting forever for an item to be added.

Third, in your for loop you call self.run(), which passes control to the run method, which then processes the entire queue and returns None after the method is changed to terminate. The following lines would throw exceptions because t would be assigned the value None. Since you want to spawn other threads to do the work, you should do t = Word(queue) to get a new word thread and then t.start() to start. So, the code when put together should be

class Words(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, queue):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue

    def run(self): 
        while True:
            try:
                word = self.queue.get(False)
            except Queue.Empty:
                break
            print word 
            self.queue.task_done()

def word():
    queue = Queue.Queue()
    read = open('words.txt')
    for word in read:
        word = word.replace("\n","")
        self.put(word)       
    read.close()
    for i in range(5):
        t = Word()
        t.setDaemon(True)
        t.start()
    queue.join()

if __name__=='__main__':
    word()
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It looks to me like you're mixing up a number of different aspects of threads, when you really just need a simple solution. As far as I can tell, the for i in range(5): loop never gets past the first iteration because you run the thread and it gets caught in an infinite loop.

Here's how I would do it:

import threading
import Queue

class Worker(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, queue):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue

    def run(self):
        while True:
            # try to dequeue a word from the queue
            try:
                word = self.queue.get_nowait()
            # if there's nothing in the queue, break because we're done
            except Queue.Empty:
                break

            # if the 'try' was successful at getting a word, print it
            print word


def fill_queue(queue):
    read = open('words.txt')
    for word in read:
        word = word.replace("\n", "")
        queue.put(word)
    read.close()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    # create empty queue
    queue = Queue.Queue()

    # fill the queue with work
    fill_queue(queue)

    # create 5 worker threads
    threads = []
    for i in range(5):
        threads.append(Worker(queue))

    # start threads
    for thread in threads:
        thread.start()

    # join threads once they finish
    for thread in threads:
        thread.join()
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If you would like to read over some examples of threaded code in Python, the following recipes might be able teach you some basics regarding the subject. Some of them are demonstrations, and others are programs:

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