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On page load I am calling the function LinkPages() and am going to be adding its HTML to a a DIV.

MasterPage.aspx

    function LinkPages()
    var xmlhttp;
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {// code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
    xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else {// code for IE6, IE5
    xmlhttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200) {
    alert(xmlhttp.responseText);
    }
    }
    xmlhttp.open("GET", "Page1.aspx", true);
    xmlhttp.send();
    }

The problem that I ran into is Page1.aspx also has a XMLHttpRequest in function GetMessage that is never being called. GetMessage() is suppose to set the innerHTML of a span on Page1.aspx and it is not being called.

Page1.aspx

    function GetMessage()
    var xmlhttp;
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {// code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
    xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else {// code for IE6, IE5
    xmlhttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200) {
        document.getElementById("lblMessage").innerHTML = xmlhttp.responseText;
    }
    }
    xmlhttp.open("GET", "wfrmHelper.aspx?action=message", true); --returns string
    xmlhttp.send();
    }

Is it possible to call javascript on the page in the XMLHttpRequest?

share|improve this question
    
.NET now comes with jQuery. Why are you doing XHR the hard way? –  Diodeus May 15 '12 at 17:02
    
Where do you call the GetMessage() function? You would have to do so once Page1.aspx is done loading. –  lbstr May 15 '12 at 17:03
    
I am using XHR because in this build of the project we are not using jQuery on the web pages and are using moo tools. –  user1167466 May 15 '12 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your first XHR on MasterPage.apsx you are calling the server and getting some HTML back (and I am guessing that this Javascript GetMessage is mixed in on that page somewhere). Unless you append your XHR's responseText to the document, the JavaScript will never get evaluated. So... in LinkPages() you need to add the response from your XKR call to the document, and then the GetMessage function will be evaluated by the browser. Until it gets added, it is only a String in memory. It doesn't actually turn into script until you place it on the DOM. I hope this makes sense.

share|improve this answer

In your case, an iframe might work better:

<iframe src="Page1.aspx" onload="LinkPages()"></iframe>

If you prefer an xmlHttpRequest, then you'll need to find a way to run the script after you get the response, as explained by @aaronfrost. A library like jQuery will do it for you (if you use jQuery.load, jQuery has a globalEval function that will run the scripts).

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Re: Is it possible to call javascript in the response page in the XMLHttpRequest?

Yes, but it won't happen automagically when you add the response to the page.

Instead, you need to locate the script(s) in the response, and then invoke each of the scripts.

Even better is for the response to contain two sections: one for the html and one for the scripts to be executed. For example, the response would have two attributes in a JSON structure:

 {'html': '<div>blah blah....',  // the html part of the response
  'js':  'the javascript....'} // the javascript that you want to execute

Also

  • You also need to consider if the incoming JS depends on any libs that you need to load. New library scripts can be added at runtime.
  • It is a very bad idea to call xmlhttprequest directly. Use jQuery or another lib as an intermediate.

Added

Why it is a bad idea to call xmlhttprequest directly:

  1. Bugs. You have to write more software (versus using a library). More sw == more bugs, more maintenance, etc. A bad idea.
  2. Testing. Your software has to become either capability-dependent or browser-dependent. Either way, your code is more brittle than relying on a well-tested and supported library that is in use by many many people/applications. The wide use of the library gives you assurance that it is continuing to function properly as browsers change.
  3. Maintainability. Your additional software (to handle the different browser cases) takes maintainers longer to understand and update than software which uses standard libraries.
  4. Expense. More bugs, less testing and more difficulty in maintenance means that your software will, over time, cost more than sw which uses standard libraries.
  5. False economies. You have many choices for JS libraries. You can use more complete ones (larger) or smaller, lighter weight libs if download size is an issue. (And note that I said a lib should be used, I certainly didn't say that jQuery needs to be used.)
  6. Duplicated code. Libraries are so common these days, the odds that a lib has already been loaded either by the page or can be loaded from the browser cache is pretty good. In either case, using the non-library code will take up more space/time than using the lib.

In summary, the only reason not to use a standard lib is if you're a student and the assignment prohibits the use of libraries.

I can't see any reason for an adept developer not to use a lib to cover over the browser incompatibilities of Ajax calls. Please provide comments if you disagree.

share|improve this answer
1  
-1 feel free to say you prefer jQuery, but don't state that "is a very bad idea to call xmlhttprequest directly" –  Christophe May 15 '12 at 17:10
    
See my addition to the answer. –  Larry K May 16 '12 at 0:55

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