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I am using Jdbctemplate to retrieve a single String value from the db. Here is my method.

    public String test() {
        String cert=null;
        String sql = "select ID_NMB_SRZ from codb_owner.TR_LTM_SLS_RTN 
             where id_str_rt = '999' and ID_NMB_SRZ = '60230009999999'";
        cert = (String) jdbc.queryForObject(sql, String.class); 
        return cert;
    }

In my scenario it is complete possible to NOT get a hit on my query so my question is how do I get around the following error message.

EmptyResultDataAccessException: Incorrect result size: expected 1, actual 0

It would seem to me that I should just get back a null instead of throwing an exception. How can I fix this? Thanks in advance.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 59 down vote accepted

In JdbcTemplate , queryForInt, queryForLong, queryForObject all such methods expects that executed query will return one and only one row. If you get no rows or more than one row that will result in IncorrectResultSizeDataAccessException . Now the correct way is not to catch this exception or EmptyResultDataAccessException, but make sure the query you are using should return only one row. If at all it is not possible then use query method instead.

List<String> strLst  = getJdbcTemplate().query(sql,
            new RowMapper {
public Object mapRow(ResultSet rs, int rowNum) throws SQLException {
        return rs.getString(1);
            }
});


if ( strLst.isEmpty() ){
  return null;
}else if ( strLst.size() == 1 ) { // list contains exactly 1 element
  return strLst.get(0);
}else{  // list contains more than 1 elements
  //your wish, you can either throw the exception or return 1st element.

}
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Thanks @Rakesh, this solution worked. Much cleaner. –  Byron May 16 '12 at 16:10
    
As mentioned below, the only drawback here is that if the return type was a complex type you would be building multiple objects and instantiating a list, also ResultSet.next() would be called unnecessarily. Using a ResultSetExtractor is a much more efficient tool in this case. –  Brett Ryan May 6 '13 at 0:52
1  
There's a missing parentheses in anonymous class definition - new RowMapper () –  Janis Koluzs Dec 9 '13 at 8:40
    
I'm with Brett on this. ResultSetExtractor is cleaner :) –  laher Apr 6 at 8:49
    
Hi @Rakesh, why not only return null in catch(EmptyResultDataAccessException exception){ return null; } ? –  Vishal Zanzrukia Jun 18 at 21:26

In Postgres, you can make almost any single value query return a value or null by wrapping it:

SELECT (SELECT <query>) AS value

and hence avoid complexity in the caller.

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Since getJdbcTemplate().queryForMap expects minimum size of one but when it returns null it shows EmptyResultDataAccesso fix dis when can use below logic

Map loginMap =null; try{ loginMap = getJdbcTemplate().queryForMap(sql, new Object[] {CustomerLogInInfo.getCustLogInEmail()}); } catch(EmptyResultDataAccessException ex){ System.out.println("Exception......."); loginMap =null; } if(loginMap==null || loginMap.isEmpty()){ return null; } else{ return loginMap; }

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I dealt with this before & had posted in the spring forums.

http://forum.spring.io/forum/spring-projects/data/123129-frustrated-with-emptyresultdataaccessexception

The advice we received was to use a type of SQlQuery. Here's an example of what we did when trying to get a value out of a DB that might not be there.

@Component
public class FindID extends MappingSqlQuery<Long> {

        @Autowired
        public void setDataSource(DataSource dataSource) {

                String sql = "Select id from address where id = ?";

                super.setDataSource(dataSource);

                super.declareParameter(new SqlParameter(Types.VARCHAR));

                super.setSql(sql);

                compile();
        }

        @Override
        protected Long mapRow(ResultSet rs, int rowNum) throws SQLException {
                return rs.getLong(1);
        }

In the DAO then we just call...

Long id = findID.findObject(id);

Not clear on performance, but it works and is neat.

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Since returning a null when there is no data is something I want to do often when using queryForObject I have found it useful to extend JdbcTemplate and add a queryForNullableObject method similar to below.

public class JdbcTemplateExtended extends JdbcTemplate {

    public JdbcTemplateExtended(DataSource datasource){
        super(datasource);
    }

    public <T> T queryForNullableObject(String sql, RowMapper<T> rowMapper) throws DataAccessException {
        List<T> results = query(sql, rowMapper);

        if (results == null || results.isEmpty()) {
            return null;
        }
        else if (results.size() > 1) {
            throw new IncorrectResultSizeDataAccessException(1, results.size());
        }
        else{
            return results.iterator().next();
        }
    }

    public <T> T queryForNullableObject(String sql, Class<T> requiredType) throws DataAccessException {
        return queryForObject(sql, getSingleColumnRowMapper(requiredType));
    }

}

You can now use this in your code the same way you used queryForObject

String result = queryForNullableObject(queryString, String.class);

I would be interested to know if anyone else thinks this is a good idea?

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Actually, You can play with JdbcTemplate and customize your own method as you prefer. My suggestion is to make something like this:

public String test() {
    String cert = null;
    String sql = "select ID_NMB_SRZ from codb_owner.TR_LTM_SLS_RTN
        where id_str_rt = '999' and ID_NMB_SRZ = '60230009999999'";
    ArrayList<String> certList = (ArrayList<String>) jdbc.query(
        sql, new RowMapperResultSetExtractor(new UserMapper()));
    cert =  DataAccessUtils.singleResult(certList);

    return cert;
}

It works as the original jdbc.queryForObject, but without throw new EmptyResultDataAccessException when size == 0.

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UserMapper()? –  Abdull Oct 6 '13 at 15:16

You may also use a ResultSetExtractor instead of a RowMapper. Both are just as easy as one another, the only difference is you handle the ResultSet.next().

public String test() {
    String sql = "select ID_NMB_SRZ from codb_owner.TR_LTM_SLS_RTN "
                 + " where id_str_rt = '999' and ID_NMB_SRZ = '60230009999999'";
    return jdbc.query(sql, new ResultSetExtractor<String>() {
        @Override
        public String extractData(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException,
                                                       DataAccessException {
            return rs.next() ? rs.getString("ID_NMB_SRZ") : null;
        }
    });
}

The ResultSetExtractor has the added benefit that you can handle all cases where there are more than one rows or no rows returned.

Using with other types is also quite simple, the only caveat being that you can't reuse the same ResultSetExtractor for where both a list and a single object must be returned.

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You could use a group function so that your query always returns a result. ie

MIN(ID_NMB_SRZ)
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That's not a good solution because you're relying on exceptions for control flow. In your solution it's normal to get exceptions, it's normal to have them in the log.

public String test() {
    String sql = "select ID_NMB_SRZ from codb_owner.TR_LTM_SLS_RTN where id_str_rt = '999' and ID_NMB_SRZ = '60230009999999'";
    List<String> certs = jdbc.queryForList(sql, String.class); 
    if (certs.isEmpty()) {
        return null;
    } else {
        return certs.get(0);
    }
}
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queryForObjectList is not an option in Springframework. –  Byron May 15 '12 at 22:54
    
my solution might not be the most elegant but at least mine works. You give an example of queryForObjectList which is not even an option with Jdbctemplate. –  Byron May 15 '12 at 23:11
    
Sorry, it's #queryForList –  Philippe Marschall May 16 '12 at 5:27
1  
Only drawback here is that if the return type was a complex type you would be building multiple objects and instantiating a list, also ResultSet.next() would be called unnecessarily. Using a ResultSetExtractor is a much more efficient tool in this case. –  Brett Ryan May 6 '13 at 0:51

Ok, I figured it out. I just wrapped it in a try catch and send back null.

    public String test() {
            String cert=null;
            String sql = "select ID_NMB_SRZ from codb_owner.TR_LTM_SLS_RTN 
                     where id_str_rt = '999' and ID_NMB_SRZ = '60230009999999'";
            try {
                Object o = (String) jdbc.queryForObject(sql, String.class);
                cert = (String) o;
            } catch (EmptyResultDataAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            return cert;
    }
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