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I am trying to subtract 1 from a double with this code:

-(NSMutableArray *)getMoreTwitterDataWithMaxID:(double)maxID {
    double newestID = (maxID - 1);
    NSLog(@"newest ID is %f and maxID is %f", newestID, maxID);
    // other code
}

The console is spitting this out:

2012-05-15 11:21:14.693 nearYou[2570:3a03] newest ID is 202429657738522624.000000 and maxID is 202429657738522624.000000

I'm not sure why they aren't subtracting . . .

Any help greatly appreciated!

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1  
How many bits of precision does a double have? How many bits are needed to represent 202429657738522625 in binary? –  Stephen Canon May 15 '12 at 18:33
    
More than 52 :) –  Cthutu May 15 '12 at 18:52
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may have reached the limits of the double floating point format. The 64-bit floating point format only has a 52-bit mantissa, meaning it can only hold an integer of 52 bits with any integer accuracy before it uses the exponent. Your number is larger than that so the gap between one integer and the next possible one has grown bigger than 1.

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Yep, except delete "may" and replace 52 with 53. –  Stephen Canon May 15 '12 at 18:41
    
Thanks for the info thats very helpful. Should I use a float then instead? –  Sean Danzeiser May 15 '12 at 18:42
    
Nope: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-precision_floating-point_format. 52-bit mantissa, 11-bit exponent and 1 bit sign. –  Cthutu May 15 '12 at 18:42
1  
No don't use a float, that's even worse as that has a smaller mantissa. Use a 64-bit integer. –  Cthutu May 15 '12 at 18:43
    
@Cthutu: 52 explicit bits. 1 implicit bit. 53 significand bits in all. –  Stephen Canon May 15 '12 at 18:49
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May be you have reached the limit of the double data type. You can use NSDecimal instead.

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If a 64-bit integer is not enough, then you can use NSDecimal. But if you're using only integers and 64-bits is enough then NSDecimal is overkill. –  Cthutu May 15 '12 at 18:50
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