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I am using MS SQL Server 2008 R2 and I need to have a cell in each row with the date and time of when the row was inserted in the database. Now as I want to script and then load the database in MS SQL Server 2005 I Cannot use datetime or date so I tried to use getdate() function in the Computed Column Specification property. Can anyone please help me.

Thanks

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2  
Why cant you use datetime? –  JonH May 15 '12 at 19:07
2  
Getdate() should be in a default value specification not a computed column. –  RThomas May 15 '12 at 19:10
1  
What is the point of computed column with getdate() ? Did you mean normal column with default getdate() ? –  a1ex07 May 15 '12 at 19:11
    
well to tell you the truth im just a beginner in SQL but i found an example where he put the getdate function in a computed coloumn i will try it in the default value property. I cannot use datetime because it will give an error when scripted for sql server 2005 as it was not supported then –  Jean Claude Abela May 15 '12 at 19:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Jean Claude, here is a complete example.

Code

USE tempdb;
SET NOCOUNT ON;
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.TestTable (
    RecordId         int         IDENTITY,
    RecordValue      varchar(32) NOT NULL,
    RecordCreateDate datetime    NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT PK_TestTable
    PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (
        RecordId
    )
)
GO

ALTER TABLE dbo.TestTable
ADD CONSTRAINT DF_TestTable_RecordCreateDate
DEFAULT GETDATE()
FOR RecordCreateDate;
GO

INSERT INTO dbo.TestTable (RecordValue) VALUES ('this');
WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:01';
INSERT INTO dbo.TestTable (RecordValue) VALUES ('that');
WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:01';
INSERT INTO dbo.TestTable (RecordValue) VALUES ('the other thing');

SELECT * FROM dbo.TestTable;

Results

RecordId RecordValue     RecordCreateDate
-------- --------------- -----------------------
1        this            2012-05-16 10:43:48.400
2        that            2012-05-16 10:43:49.403
3        the other thing 2012-05-16 10:43:50.403

You should also research the new datetime data types and the SYSDATETIME() function.

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Jean Claude, you seem to be under a misapprehension about datetime, which has been supported in every version of SQL Server I've ever used, all the way back to 6.5. It's the Date and Time types that are new in SQL 2008.

Rob's excellent answer should work fine in both SQL 2005 and 2008.

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