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Is there any MVC framework around that applies POCO concept to controllers ?

Example:
Suppose I don't want to make my controller dependent on any web framework, in the way that I don't need to inherit from framework Controller class anymore.
Instead, I want to just specify routes with some rules, describing how to map requests to methods and parameters of my POCO controller class instance.

Maybe little example below can explain it better.
Imagine we can have routing like this:

routes.MapPOCOController<MyPOCO>("MyWebAppName/{method}/{*parameters}", () => _container.Resolve<MyPOCO>());
routes.IfMethodReturns<MyCustomRedirectResult>().PerformRedirect(result => result.Url);

and then your controller class is just a POCO object:

public class MyPOCO {
    public User     GetUser(Guid userId) {...}
    public string   Home() { 
        return _razorEngine.Render("~/Views/Home/Index.cshtml", new HomeModel { Message = "Hello world!"});
    }
    public object   RenderSomePageOrRedirect()
    {
        if(blabla)
            return new MyCustomRedirectResult("/profile");
        else
            return _razorEngine.Render( ... );
    }
    ...
}
  • In first method "GetUser" JSON serialization could happen automagically like in mvc4.
  • In second method "Home" we need to render our views manually as a string, so this would give you more flexibility, like combining different engines or writing a custom one in much more natural way than it happens in current asp.mvc implementation.
  • In third method "RenderSomePageOrRedirect" we are not tight to current RedirectResult implementation and can use whatever class that works, and then map it properly in routes.

Is there any framework around that already implemented at least one of the mentioned concepts ? ... maybe some "contrib" library?

The reasons why I'm looking for such functionality are:

  • I want to follow DRY principle and don't want to mix request/response mapping code with the business logic in the controller (you can't do both with current mvc implementations that I'm aware of)
  • I want to make my controller classes usable in multiple contexts, so, it's easier for unit-testing, for reusing and so on. (code becomes more DRY when you reusing same controllers in different web applications: you simply need to adjust routes a bit)
  • It's just a gut feeling that this way of doing things is better, sorry, my words renderer gives up (

PS: my appreciation to people (StriplingWarrior especially) who commented below and helped me to form this question properly!

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How would you host your controllers, etc with no framework to interact with the web server? –  Maess May 15 '12 at 19:16
3  
So you want to create your own MVC framework? –  jrummell May 15 '12 at 19:16
2  
@ILICH: Well I would say that a properly abstracted business layer referenced by the framework controllers and some judicious routing would solve your problems without reinventing a reasonably reliable wheel. –  Jeremy Holovacs May 15 '12 at 20:25
1  
@ILICH: Could you provide a code sample to show how you would expect such a controller to work? For example, if you want your controller to double as a service, what type of object would its actions return? How would those objects get rendered when in MVC mode versus Service mode? I think the idea behind this question has some merit, but as it stands you haven't explained your intent with enough detail to yield a decent answer. –  StriplingWarrior May 15 '12 at 20:52
2  
@ILICH: That's not enough code to flesh out your question. What would MyService look like? What kind of results would its actions return? You want MyService to effectively double as both the controller and the service, right? If so, what kind of transformation would be performed on the return types of its methods to make them renderable in views? If you want anybody else to take your question seriously, you need to show that you've given it serious thought. –  StriplingWarrior May 15 '12 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually there is FubuMvc . It seems to be pretty much what you're looking for. The only problem is scarce documentation.

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framework looks awesome, thanks for pointing out! –  ILICH Dec 31 '12 at 17:51

AFAIK there's isn't such framework. ASP.NET MVC controllers must derive from the Controller, AsyncController or the ApiController class. So I guess you will have to write your own MVC framework if you want to implement such concepts.

share|improve this answer
    
And that is so sad! :'( –  ILICH May 16 '12 at 17:13

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