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I'm working on a data set that includes community data, and many of the columns (species) have a lot of zeroes. I would like to be able to drop these columns for some of the analyses I'm doing, based on the sum of the whole column. I'm tempted to do this with a for loop, but I hear that the apply and by functions are better when you're using R. My goal is to remove all columns with a sum of less than 15. I have used which() to remove rows by factors, e.g.,

September<-which(data$Time_point=="September")

data<-data[-September,] 

and the two ways I've tried removing columns is by using apply():

data<-data[,apply(data,2,function(x)sum(x<=15))]

and by using a messy for loop/if else combo:

for (i in 6:length(data)){
    if (sum(data[,i])<=15)
    data[,i]<-NULL
    else 
    data[,i]<-data[,i]
    }

Neither of these methods has been working. Surely there is an elegant way to get rid of columns based on logical criteria?

str(head(data,10))
'data.frame':   10 obs. of  23 variables:
 $ Core_num    : Factor w/ 159 levels "152","153","154",..: 133 72 70 75 89 85 86 90 95 99
 $ Cage_num    : num  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
 $ Treatment   : Factor w/ 4 levels "","C","CC","NC": 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
 $ Site        : Factor w/ 10 levels "","B","B07","B08",..: 1 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 9 9
 $ Time_point  : Factor w/ 3 levels "","May","September": 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
 $ Spionidae   : num  108 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Syllidae    : num  185 0 0 0 3 8 0 1 4 1
 $ Opheliidae  : num  424 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
 $ Cossuridae  : num  164 0 7 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Sternaspidae: num  214 0 0 6 1 0 11 9 0 0
 $ Sabellidae  : num  1154 0 2 2 0 ...
 $ Capitellidae: num  256 1 10 17 0 3 0 0 0 0
 $ Dorvillidae : num  21 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Cirratulidae: num  17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Oligochaeta : num  3747 12 41 27 32 ...
 $ Nematoda    : num  410 5 4 13 0 0 0 2 2 0
 $ Sipuncula   : num  33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Ostracoda   : num  335 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Decapoda    : num  62 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Amphipoda   : num  2789 75 17 34 89 ...
 $ Copepoda    : num  75 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Tanaidacea  : num  84 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
 $ Mollusca    : int  55 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
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1  
It would be much easier to help if you provided some reproducible data. For instance, the output of str(head(data,10)) would probably be sufficient. (Printed versions of you data are generally useless, since they are difficult to copy+paste into examples, and they provide no information about how the data is stored, which can be crucial.) –  joran May 15 '12 at 20:18
    
Thanks @joran. I have edited the original question to contain that output. Sorry for the inconvenience! –  Margaret May 15 '12 at 20:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What about a simple subset? First, we create a simple data frameL

R> dd = data.frame(x = runif(5), y = 20*runif(5), z=20*runif(5))

Then select the columns where the sum is greater than 15

R> dd1 = dd[,colSums(dd) > 15]
R> ncol(dd1)
[1] 2

In your data set, you only want to subset columns 6 onwards, so something like:

 ##Drop the first five columns
 dd[,colSums(dd[,6:ncol(dd)]) > 15]

or

 #Keep the first six columns
 cols_to_drop = c(rep(TRUE, 5), dd[,6:ncol(dd)]>15)
 dd[,cols_to_drop]

should work.


The key part to note is that in the square brackets, we want a vector of logicals, i.e. a vector of TRUE and FALSE. So if you wanted to subset using something a bit more complicated, then create a function that returns TRUE or FALSE and subset as usual.

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You should be able to directly index your data.frame with a boolean and colSums(). For example:

set.seed(123)
dat <- data.frame(var1 = runif(10), var2 = rnorm(10), var3 = rlnorm(10))
colSums(dat)
#-----
     var1      var2      var3 
 5.782475  1.317914 12.91987
#Let's set the threshold at 5, so we should get var1 and var3
> dat[, colSums(dat) > 5]
#-----
        var1      var3
1  0.2875775 5.9709924
2  0.7883051 1.6451811
3  0.4089769 0.1399294
...

EDIT - to address non-numeric columns

set.seed(123)
dat <- data.frame(var1 = runif(10), var2 = rnorm(10), var3 = rlnorm(10), var4 = "notNumeric")

require(plyr)
dat[, -which(numcolwise(sum)(dat) < 5)]

Consolec:/documents and settings/charles/desktop/

> dat[, -which(numcolwise(sum)(dat) < 5)]
        var1      var3       var4
1  0.2875775 5.9709924 notNumeric
2  0.7883051 1.6451811 notNumeric
3  0.4089769 0.1399294 notNumeric
.....
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2  
Cue the OP saying it didn't work on their data set in 3...2...1...(look at the first 6 columns of their data frame). –  joran May 15 '12 at 20:21
    
data[,c(1:5, colSums(data[, 6:length(data)]>15])]. The apply version would be similar but I think colSums is faster. –  Justin May 15 '12 at 20:24
    
@joran - bah, good point. Without thinking too much, this should work require(plyr); dat[, -which(numcolwise(sum(dat) < threshold))] –  Chase May 15 '12 at 20:27
    
@Justin - yeah that would work, though I am always hesitant to hardcode column names/numbers since they become much use generalizable then. –  Chase May 15 '12 at 21:35
    
@Chase same here. I usually use numcolwise too if I'm making things reusable. But often I like the check (and associated errors) that hard coded column names give me if I am using it in a script for report output or something. –  Justin May 15 '12 at 21:52

This will give back the columns that don't contain all zeros including factors and character columns (I only read in the first rowchunky thing of your data):

Read in some of your data:

dat <- read.table(text="  Core_num Cage_num Treatment Site Time_point Spionidae Nereididae Syllidae Opheliidae
6        24        1         C   M2        May         0          0        0          0
4        22        2         C   M2        May         0          0        0          1
9        27        3         C   M2        May         0          0        0          0
23       41        4         C    M        May         0          0        3          0
19       37        5         C    M        May         0          0        8          0
20       38        6         C    M        May         0          0        0          1",  header=T)

The code:

summer <- function(x){
    if(is.numeric(x)){
        sum(x) > 15
    } else {
        TRUE
    }
}

dat[, sapply(dat,  summer)]
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