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class TestClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 100
        self.x = lambda: self.value.__add__(100)
        self.run()

    def run(self):        
        self.x()
        print self.value

t = TestClass()

#Output: 100

I would like to able to define a lambda function such as the one in TestClass and have it alter an instance variable. It would seem that the way the lambda is constructed means that it does not modify the original value. I suspect that this to do with Python's reference strategy which I do more or less understand.

So accepting the flaws in what I have done, is there a similar way to get similar functionality? I ultimately need to define many methods like x and intend to keep them in a dictionary as they will form a simple instruction set. As far as I can tell I need either to use lambdas or exec to do what I want.

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you need to use lambdas? There is no reason you cannot store a reference to a function defined with the def statement in a dictionary. –  chepner May 15 '12 at 21:29
    
@chepner In that sense I do not need to use lambda but if I can do it this way the source will be a lot more readable. Well, it will at least be a lot more readable to my eye. –  sheepez May 15 '12 at 21:33
    
If the methods are short, you can always write def x(self): return something on one line. If you post some of the code you use to store your methods in a dictionary, we can figure out if lambdas are really necessary or useful. –  chepner May 15 '12 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

__add__ is not inplace, so the return value of TestClass.x is self.value + 100, but self.value is not altered. Try this:

import random
HATE_LAMBDAS = random.choice(True, False)
class TestClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 100
        if HATE_LAMBDAS:
            def x():
                self.value += 100
            self.x = x
        else:
            self.x = lambda: setattr(self, "value", self.value + 100)
        self.run()

    def run(self):        
        self.x()
        print self.value

t = TestClass()

#Output: 200

Use the setattr to increment the value while still using a lambda. Beware however, lambda's in python are one of its worst features. However, both methods work.

Edit

Just remebered something that you might find usefull! The standard library has a module called operator which implements standard operators as functions. If you plan on using lambdas a lot, you might like to investigate it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's cleared up quite a lot. Why are you so anti-lambda? –  sheepez May 15 '12 at 21:43
    
Lambda's are restricted in what they can do. The following isn't valid: lambda x: self.value = x + 100. Neither is lambda x: print x. In other languages, lambdas are much more powerfull –  BluePeppers May 15 '12 at 21:43
    
That is true, and given that I am having to write some convoluted code to allow it to fit into lambdas I am seriously considering dropping them. –  sheepez May 15 '12 at 21:47
    
That edit is really useful, that might ease some of the wrangling if I pursue this method. –  sheepez May 15 '12 at 21:50
1  
The edit is useful, but not for this problem. Note how you still need to assign the result of iadd(x, y) to the x in order to emulate x += y. No Python function can modify its arguments the way you'd expect iadd to work, if it could. –  cvoinescu May 15 '12 at 21:56

I'm just guessing at what you want to accomplish, but no lambdas necessary.

class TestClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 100
        self.methods = { 'add':      self.w,
                         'subtract': self.x,
                         'mult':     self.y,
                         'div':      self.z,
                       }
        self.run()

    def w(self): self.value += 100
    def x(self): self.value -= 100
    def y(self): self.value *= 100
    def z(self): self.value /= 100


    def run(self):        
        self.x()
        print self.value
share|improve this answer
    
My only reservation about that approach is that it will make adding items to the dictionary at runtime a little trickier (I think). –  sheepez May 15 '12 at 21:45

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