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If I assign an object to a property of another object, what is the natural way to also get the first object given the second? I think this is sort of like what foreign keys do in databases.

class Box(object):
    things = []

class Thing(object):
    box = None

thing = Thing()
box = Box()

# thing.box updates the box.things
thing.box = box
thing in box.things # should be true

# box.things updates thing.box
box.things.append(thing)
thing.box == box # should be true

I'd like to also achieve this with one-to-one, and many-to-many relationships. Is this possible?

I have been keeping a global collection of all "things" at the moment, and then providing a property on the "box", so that the information of what belongs to what is only in one place. However, the collection of things is so huge, that I'd like to place the pointers to the "thing" objects in the "box" object itself.

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is what descriptors are for, like this:

class Box(object):

    things = []


class BoxManager(object):

    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        if isinstance(value, Box):
            instance._box = value
            Box.things.append(instance)

    def __get__(self, instance, type_=None):
        return instance._box


class Thing(object):
    box = BoxManager()


thing = Thing()
box = Box()

# thing.box updates the box.things
thing.box = box
print 'Thing is in box.things', thing in box.things  # should be true

# box.things updates thing.box
box.things.append(thing)
thing.box == box  # should be true
print 'thing.box == box is', thing.box == box

import pdb
pdb.set_trace()
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For the "thing" case, were you only want to track one single object, Python's properties will work for you out of the box.

As for the container of many "things" a single property won't work - as you want to track changes to the container pointed to the object's attribute (property works for changes to the attribute itself). So a small custom container class that makes the changes needed on the objects being added to the container is a simple way to go. (I think a "set" would be better for you than a list)

class Thing(object):
    def get_box(self):
        return self._box
    def set_box(self, box):
        self._box = box
        if not self in box.things:
            box.things.add(self)
    box = property(get_box, set_box)

class CallbackSet(set):
    def __new__(cls, box, *args, **kw):
        self = set.__new__(cls, *args, **kw)
        self.box = box
    def add(self, item):
        item.box = self.box
        return set.add(self, item)

class Box(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.things = CallbackSet(self)
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but won't it be possible than, that Thing._box holds a reference to Box which might hold the same Thing in its Box.things? Which would leak memory? –  snies May 15 '12 at 23:19
    
@snies, that would simply use memory, not leak it. –  twneale May 17 '12 at 1:13
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You will probably want to use python weakref. Otherwise you will end up having circular references, which might cause problems for the garbage collector aka memory leaks.

The most important question is, who will hold the objects strong reference (the one keeping it from being garbage collected.) Will it be a "world" object or the "box" object? Who holds the box object? Other than that all others will hold weak references to everybody else. Or you could reference everybody by it's python id(), but be careful when using that with int and strings (if you do a=a+1 id(a) will have changed). Look for ideas at the end of the weakref docu.

For implementing your desired syntax look at emulating container types.

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