Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I found, on this site a way to submit a POST form without leaving the page. In that script, they put instructions on how to have a function take place after the form's been submitted. Here's what the script looked like:

$(document).ready(function(){
$form = $('form');
$form.submit(function(){
  $.post($(this).attr('action'), $(this).serialize(), function(response){
  },'json');
  return false;
});
});​

They said, between function(response){ and },'json'); you can specify other JavaScript to take place like alerts etc. after the form's been submitted. I tried

$(document).ready(function(){
$form = $('form');
$form.submit(function(){
  $.post($(this).attr('action'), $(this).serialize(), function(response){
$('form').hide();
  },'json');
  return false;
});
});

Unfortunately, that does not work, can anybody tell me why? I've set up a jsFiddle. Please help. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
It doesn't work on jsfiddle because your request fails – zerkms May 15 '12 at 22:36
    
@zerkms I see, but I've also tried it with an actual server and it still won't work. – henryaaron May 15 '12 at 22:38
    
Define "won't work." When you debug through the code, what happens? Does the call-back function get executed at all? Does the AJAX request succeed? – David May 15 '12 at 22:39
    
@user1090389 It works fine when you have a successful post request: jsfiddle.net/v5yY6/1. – VisioN May 15 '12 at 23:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using $.post, the "function(response)" is only called AFTER a successful result, so you have been misinformed about doing work within this function while the server is processing the request.

To continue processing after sending the request to the server, place the $('form').hide() after the $.post call:

$form.submit(function(){
  $.post(
    $(this).attr('action'), $(this).serialize(), 
    function(response){
    }
    ,'json'
  );
  $('form').hide();
  return false;
});
share|improve this answer

Problems:

  1. Set JavaScript variable as form, not $form. Then use it in jQuery as $(form).
  2. The context of $(this).attr('action') is the $.post() callback, not the form. Solution: $(form) instead of $(this).

Solution:

$(document).ready(function(){
    form = $('form');

    $(form).on('submit', function() {
        $.post($(form).attr('action'), $(this).serialize(), function(response) {
            $('form').hide();
        },'json');

        return false;
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Your fiddle worked fine when the form is changed to

<form action="#" method="post">

And the documentation at http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.post/ shows that this is a valid syntax and http://www.johnnycode.com/blog/2010/04/08/jquery-form-serialize-doesnt-post-submit-and-button-values-duh/ is also a running sample. If it's not working at all for you then, as silly as this is, do you have a reference to jQuery in your page?

share|improve this answer
    
No. Never post to "#". Keep your real "action". It should work by getting to the root of the problem, not patch it up. – Ayman Safadi May 15 '12 at 23:11
    
Then use <form action="/echo/html/" method="post"> instead. The fiddle needs to actually post. You can use any of the /echo endpoints. – BrianM May 15 '12 at 23:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.