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I want to make a script that will take a file, strip off the last byte of a file. The file can be anything, not just text.

I have been playing around with the seek() and tell() methods, but I can't find a way of dealing with the file that allows me to do this.

I figured it should be relatively trivial, but perhaps Python is not an appropriate tool for this?

fileStripped = file[:-4]
newpath = path + "\\" + fileStripped 
if not os.path.exists(newpath): 
 os.makedirs(newpath)
with open(fname, "r") as f:
 f.seek (0, 2)           # Seek @ EOF
 fsize = f.tell()        # Get Size
 f=f.read
 f=f[:fsize-2]

This method errors, and tells me I can not subscript the f=f[:fsize-2] line

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to do it in-place or write it to a new file? –  ThiefMaster May 15 '12 at 22:59
    
I want to write as new file –  Jay May 15 '12 at 23:00
1  
@Jay: The f=f.read should be f=f.read(). What you're currently asking it to do is subscript the read method. –  MRAB May 15 '12 at 23:03
1  
On unix you can simply do truncate -s -1 filename. –  georg May 15 '12 at 23:09
    
@MRAB Oh! great, nice catch, thanks :) –  Jay May 16 '12 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use shutil.copyfileobj to copy the file and then remove the last byte by seeking back one byte and truncating the file:

with open(srcfile, 'r') as fsrc:
    with open(destfile, 'w+') as fdest:
        shutil.copyfileobj(fsrc, fdest)
        fdest.seek(-1, os.SEEK_END)
        fdest.truncate()
share|improve this answer
    
Ack, its so easy when you know how! Thank you. This is perfect. –  Jay May 16 '12 at 0:28

Seek one byte from the end, and truncate.

f = open(..., 'r+')
f.seek(-1, os.SEEK_END)
f.truncate()
f.close()
share|improve this answer
2  
That would modify the existing file - he wants to write the truncated data to a new file. –  ThiefMaster May 15 '12 at 23:03
    
Well, copying first is easy. And the change is a single byte at the end, so you save nothing doing it the hard way. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 15 '12 at 23:03
    
Thank you, this method would work, but I picked TMs as correct as it includes the copying step. I appreciate your time. –  Jay May 16 '12 at 0:29

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