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I have a class (EAGLView) which calls a method of a C++ class without problems. Now, the problem is that I need to call in that C++ class a objective-C function [context renderbufferStorage:GL_RENDERBUFFER fromDrawable:(CAEAGLLayer*)self.layer]; which I cannot do in C++ syntax.

I could wrap this Objective-C call to the same Objective-C class which in the first place called the C++ class, but then I need to somehow call that method from C++, and I cannot figure out how to do it.

I tried to give a pointer to EAGLView object to the C++ method and include the "EAGLView.h" in my C++ class header but I got 3999 errors..

So.. how should I do this? An example would be nice.. I only found pure C examples of doing this.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 103 down vote accepted

You can mix C++ with Objective-C if you do it carefully. There are a few caveats but generally speaking they can be mixed. If you want to keep them separate, you can set up a standard C wrapper function that gives the Objective-C object a usable C-style interface from non-Objective-C code (pick better names for your files, I have picked these names for verbosity):

MyObject-C-Interface.h

#ifndef __MYOBJECT_C_INTERFACE_H__
#define __MYOBJECT_C_INTERFACE_H__

// This is the C "trampoline" function that will be used
// to invoke a specific Objective-C method FROM C++
int MyObjectDoSomethingWith (void *myObjectInstance, void *parameter);
#endif

MyObject.h

#import "MyObject-C-Interface.h"

// An Objective-C class that needs to be accessed from C++
@interface MyObject : NSObject
{
    int someVar;
}

// The Objective-C member function you want to call from C++
- (int) doSomethingWith:(void *) aParameter;
@end

MyObject.mm

#import "MyObject.h"

@implementation MyObject

// C "trampoline" function to invoke Objective-C method
int MyObjectDoSomethingWith (void *self, void *aParameter)
{
    // Call the Objective-C method using Objective-C syntax
    return [(id) self doSomethingWith:aParameter];
}

- (int) doSomethingWith:(void *) aParameter
{
    // The Objective-C function you wanted to call from C++.
    // do work here..
    return 21 ; // half of 42
}
@end

MyCPPClass.cpp

#include "MyCPPClass.h"
#include "MyObject-C-Interface.h"

int MyCPPClass::someMethod (void *objectiveCObject, void *aParameter)
{
    // To invoke an Objective-C method from C++, use
    // the C trampoline function
    return MyObjectDoSomethingWith (objectiveCObject, aParameter);
}

The wrapper function does not need to be in the same .m file as the Objective-C class, but the file that it does exist in needs to be compiled as Objective-C code. The header that declares the wrapper function needs to be included in both CPP and Objective-C code.

(NOTE: if the Objective-C implementation file is given the extension ".m" it will not link under Xcode. The ".mm" extension tells Xcode to expect a combination of Objective-C and C++, i.e., Objective-C++.)


You can implement the above in an Object-Orientented manner by using the PIMPL idiom. The implementation is only slightly different. In short, you place the wrapper functions (declared in "MyObject-C-Interface.h") inside a class with a (private) void pointer to an instance of MyClass.

MyObject-C-Interface.h (PIMPL)

#ifndef __MYOBJECT_C_INTERFACE_H__
#define __MYOBJECT_C_INTERFACE_H__

class MyClassImpl
{
public:
    MyClassImpl ( void );
    ~MyClassImpl( void );

    bool init( void );
    int  doSomethingWith( void * aParameter );
    void logMyMessage( char * aCStr );

private:
    void * self;
};

#endif

Notice the wrapper methods no longer require the void pointer to an instance of MyClass; it is now a private member of MyClassImpl. The init method is used to instantiate a MyClass instance;

MyObject.h (PIMPL)

#import "MyObject-C-Interface.h"

@interface MyObject : NSObject
{
    int someVar;
}

- (int)  doSomethingWith:(void *) aParameter;
- (void) logMyMessage:(char *) aCStr;

@end

MyObject.mm (PIMPL)

#import "MyObject.h"

@implementation MyObject

MyClassImpl::MyClassImpl( void )
    : self( NULL )
{   }

MyClassImpl::~MyClassImpl( void )
{
    [(id)self dealloc];
}

void init( void )
{    
    self = [[MyClass alloc] init];
}

int MyClassImpl::doSomethingWith( void *aParameter )
{
    return [(id)self doSomethingWith:aParameter];
}

void MyClassImpl::logMyMessage( char *aCStr )
{
    [(id)self doLogMessage:aCStr];
}

- (int) doSomethingWith:(void *) aParameter
{
    int result;

    // ... some code to calculate the result

    return result;
}

- (void) logMyMessage:(char *) aCStr
{
    NSLog( aCStr );
}

@end

Notice that MyClass is instantiated with a call to MyClassImpl::init. You could instantiate MyClass in MyClassImpl's constructor, but that generally isn't a good idea. The MyClass instance is destructed from MyClassImpl's destructor. As with the C-style implementation, the wrapper methods simply defer to the respective methods of MyClass.

MyCPPClass.h (PIMPL)

#ifndef __MYCPP_CLASS_H__
#define __MYCPP_CLASS_H__

class MyClassImpl;

class MyCPPClass
{
    enum { cANSWER_TO_LIFE_THE_UNIVERSE_AND_EVERYTHING = 42 };
public:
    MyCPPClass ( void );
    ~MyCPPClass( void );

    void init( void );
    void doSomethingWithMyClass( void );

private:
    MyClassImpl * _impl;
    int           _myValue;
};

#endif

MyCPPClass.cpp (PIMPL)

#include "MyCPPClass.h"
#include "MyObject-C-Interface.h"

MyCPPClass::MyCPPClass( void )
    : _impl ( NULL )
{   }

void MyCPPClass::init( void )
{
    _impl = new MyClassImpl();
}

MyCPPClass::~MyCPPClass( void )
{
    if ( _impl ) { delete _impl; _impl = NULL; }
}

void MyCPPClass::doSomethingWithMyClass( void )
{
    int result = _impl->doSomethingWith( _myValue );
    if ( result == cANSWER_TO_LIFE_THE_UNIVERSE_AND_EVERYTHING )
    {
        _impl->logMyMessage( "Hello, Arthur!" );
    }
    else
    {
        _impl->logMyMessage( "Don't worry." );
    }
}

You now access calls to MyClass through a private implementation of MyClassImpl. This approach can be advantageous if you were developing a portable application; you could simply swap out the implementation of MyClass with one specific to the other platform ... but honestly, whether this is a better implementation is more a matter of taste and needs.

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3  
Hi, I tried it but I get linkage error saying symbol(s) not found. i.e. it can't find the MyObjectDoSomethingWith. any ideas? –  user83950 Jan 18 '10 at 7:23
2  
You might need to add extern "C" before the int MyObjectDoSomethingWith –  dreamlax Jan 18 '10 at 7:36
1  
tried that already, doesn't work and it makes sense because extern "C" is used when we want to call C++ function from C, in this case we are calling a C function from C++, no? –  user83950 Jan 18 '10 at 10:04
1  
Also, how does objectiveCObject get instantiated in MyCPPClass.cpp? –  Raffi Khatchadourian Mar 23 '12 at 17:58
1  
100th up vote was mine :) –  Inder Kumar Rathore Sep 19 at 19:36

You can compile your code as Objective-C++ - the simplest way is to rename your .cpp as .mm. It will then compile properly if you include EAGLView.h (you were getting so many errors because the C++ compiler didn't understand any of the Objective-C specific keywords), and you can (for the most part) mix Objective-C and C++ however you like.

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I have already done the renaming –  juvenis Jun 29 '09 at 23:17
    
Are you getting all of those compiler errors in this C++ file, or are they in some other C++ file that happens to include this C++ header? –  Jesse Beder Jun 29 '09 at 23:19
    
It seems I cannot include the EAGLView.h in the C++ header file because then it for some reason expects that the Objective C code is C++, and does not understand @ + other symbols –  juvenis Jun 30 '09 at 16:18

The easiest solution is to simply tell Xcode to compile everything as Objective C++.

Set your project or target settings for Compile Sources As to Objective C++ and recompile.

Then you can use C++ or Objective C everywhere, for example:

void CPPObject::Function( ObjectiveCObject* context, NSView* view )
{
   [context renderbufferStorage:GL_RENDERBUFFER fromDrawable:(CAEAGLLayer*)view.layer]
}

This has the same affect as renaming all your source files from .cpp or .m to .mm.

There are two minor downsides to this: clang cannot analyse C++ source code; some relatively weird C code does not compile under C++.

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I'm just a little curious, when you compile everything as Objective-C++ do you get warnings about using C-style casts and/or other C++-specific warnings about valid C-style code? –  dreamlax Jun 30 '09 at 3:47
    
Sure, you are programming in C++ so you'll be expected to behave appropriately - but as a general rule, C++ is a better C than C is, even if you never create a class. It wont let you do stupid things, and it lets you do nice things (like better constants and enums and such). You can still cast just the same (eg (CFFloat)x). –  Peter N Lewis Jun 30 '09 at 4:39

You need to make your C++ file be treated as Objective-C++. You can do this in xcode by renaming foo.cpp to foo.mm (.mm is the obj-c++ extension). Then as others have said standard obj-c messaging syntax will work.

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Sometimes renaming .cpp to .mm is not good idea, especially when project is crossplatform. In this case for xcode project I open xcode project file throught TextEdit, found string which contents interest file, it should be like:

/* OnlineManager.cpp */ = {isa = PBXFileReference; fileEncoding = 4; lastKnownFileType = sourcecode.cpp.cpp; path = OnlineManager.cpp; sourceTree = "<group>"; };

and then change file type from sourcecode.cpp.cpp to sourcecode.cpp.objcpp

/* OnlineManager.cpp */ = {isa = PBXFileReference; fileEncoding = 4; lastKnownFileType = **sourcecode.cpp.objcpp**; path = OnlineManager.cpp; sourceTree = "<group>"; };

It is equivalent to rename .cpp to .mm

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Also, you can call into Objective-C runtime to call the method.

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You can mix C++ in with Objectiv-C (Objective C++). Write a C++ method in your Objective C++ class that simply calls [context renderbufferStorage:GL_RENDERBUFFER fromDrawable:(CAEAGLLayer*)self.layer]; and call it from your C++.

I haven't tried it before my self, but give it a shot, and share the results with us.

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2  
But the problem is that how can I call it... because if I include "EAGLview.h" in my C++ class I get thousands of errors. –  juvenis Jun 29 '09 at 23:16

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