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Using AngularJS if I set a simple input text box value to something like "bob" below. The value does not display if the ng-model attribute is added.

    <input type="text"
           id="rootFolder"
           ng-model="rootFolders"
           disabled="disabled"
           value="Bob"
           size="40"/>

Anyone know of a simple work around to default this input to something and keep the ng-model? I tried to use a ng-bind with the default value but that seems not to work either.

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up vote 137 down vote accepted

That's desired behavior, you should define the model in the controller, not in the view.

<div ng-controller="Main">
  <input type="text" ng-model="rootFolders">
</div>


function Main($scope) {
  $scope.rootFolders = 'bob';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works. – HelloWorld May 16 '12 at 16:03
7  
Thanks. But in this case, the model is set in the controller. And in the Angular docs, it's always the same, data is set in controller. But my controller is in a JS file. How to do when on an "edit" form ? How to pass default form data to controller "the angular way"? – ByScripts Dec 4 '13 at 11:06
5  
This doesn't work for me however adding additional attribute ng-init shown by Mark Rajcok (ng-init="rootFolders='Bob'") works fine. – Kaizar Laxmidhar Sep 11 '14 at 13:24
    
And how do I set the default value if I have an input field like: <input type="number" ng-model="newTransaction[$index][user.email]" /> ? – shish Dec 3 '15 at 22:17

Vojta described the "Angular way", but if you really need to make this work, @urbanek recently posted a workaround using ng-init:

<input type="text" ng-model="rootFolders" ng-init="rootFolders='Bob'" value="Bob">

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/angular/Hn3eztNHFXw/wk3HyOl9fhcJ

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19  
You may not need the 'value="Bob"' part. – Mark Rajcok Dec 8 '12 at 6:35
1  
+1 but, As mentioned in one of the posts on the linked discussion, it should be avoided (as logically it's less correct & it makes testing harder). – 0xc0de Mar 13 '13 at 5:24
    
Does this still work? I can't seem to make this happen today – JZ. Jul 6 '13 at 19:23
1  
@JZ., here's a fiddle – Mark Rajcok Jul 7 '13 at 1:57
1  
This method works fine if you use a model value as well on v1.2. <... ng-init="rootFolders=someModelAttribute"...> – dmcqu314 Apr 29 '14 at 16:54

Overriding the input directive does seem to do the job. I made some minor alterations to Dan Hunsaker's code:

  • Added a check for ngModel before trying to use $parse().assign() on fields without a ngModel attributes.
  • Corrected the assign() function param order.
app.directive('input', function ($parse) {
  return {
    restrict: 'E',
    require: '?ngModel',
    link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
      if (attrs.ngModel && attrs.value) {
        $parse(attrs.ngModel).assign(scope, attrs.value);
      }
    }
  };
});
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1  
I see no reason this answer not to be upvoted – Lim Dec 25 '13 at 7:54
    
This is actually quite clever – Robert Koritnik Feb 5 '14 at 19:52
    
I like that, it solved my problem. – Eman Jun 13 '14 at 17:29
    
This is the best answer I found!... solves my problem in an elegant way. I had to capture a value on a hidden input (a Symfony form token, generated in the server). – PachinSV Jul 26 '14 at 16:58
1  
This seems the best solution if you also want a basic version of your HTML form to work without JavaScript. – Darren Dec 2 '14 at 21:31

The Angular way

The correct Angular way to do this is to write a single page app, AJAX in the form template, then populate it dynamically from the model. The model is not populated from the form by default because the model is the single source of truth. Instead Angular will go the other way and try to populate the form from the model.

If however, you don't have time to start over from scratch

If you have an app written, this might involve some fairly hefty architectural changes. If you're trying to use Angular to enhance an existing form, rather than constructing an entire single page app from scratch, you can pull the value from the form and store it in the scope at link time using a directive. Angular will then bind the value in the scope back to the form and keep it in sync.

Using a directive

You can use a relatively simple directive to pull the value from the form and load it in to the current scope. Here I've defined an initFromForm directive.

var myApp = angular.module("myApp", ['initFromForm']);

angular.module('initFromForm', [])
  .directive("initFromForm", function ($parse) {
    return {
      link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
        var attr = attrs.initFromForm || attrs.ngModel || element.attrs('name'),
        val = attrs.value;
        $parse(attr).assign(scope, val)
      }
    };
  });

You can see I've defined a couple of fallbacks to get a model name. You can use this directive in conjunction with the ngModel directive, or bind to something other than $scope if you prefer.

Use it like this:

<input name="test" ng-model="toaster.test" value="hello" init-from-form />
{{toaster.test}}

Note this will also work with textareas, and select dropdowns.

<textarea name="test" ng-model="toaster.test" init-from-form>hello</textarea>
{{toaster.test}}
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Here's a packed module that implements a solution similar to what is described here github.com/platanus/angular-keep-values – Agustin Jun 23 '15 at 20:38

Update: My original answer involved having the controller contain DOM-aware code, which breaks Angular conventions in favor of HTML. @dmackerman mentioned directives in a comment on my answer, and I completely missed that until just now. With that input, here's the right way to do this without breaking Angular or HTML conventions:


There's also a way to get both - grab the value of the element and use that to update the model in a directive:

<div ng-controller="Main">
    <input type="text" id="rootFolder" ng-model="rootFolders" disabled="disabled" value="Bob" size="40" />
</div>

and then:

app.directive('input', ['$parse', function ($parse) {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        require: '?ngModel',
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            if(attrs.value) {
                $parse(attrs.ngModel).assign(scope, attrs.value);
            }
        }
    };
}]);

You can of course modify the above directive to do more with the value attribute before setting the model to its value, including using $parse(attrs.value, scope) to treat the value attribute as an Angular expression (though I'd probably use a different [custom] attribute for that, personally, so the standard HTML attributes are consistently treated as constants).

Also, there is a similar question over at Making data templated in available to ng-model which may also be of interest.

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You shouldn't be doing any DOM manipulation/discovery in your controllers. Should use a directive instead. – dmackerman Sep 20 '13 at 14:43
1  
I explicitly mentioned that drawback in my answer. You shouldn't, but you can. It all depends on whether you find it more important to follow Angular's or HTML's conventions. Because Angular does break HTML. – Dan Hunsaker Oct 18 '13 at 17:14
3  
Oh, I am a dummy. Completely missed the bit about using a directive. Answer updated accordingly. Sincerest apologies for being a jerk to you, @dmackerman. – Dan Hunsaker Dec 4 '13 at 23:02
    
Thanks for the directive! It gave me ideas to apply in a project I'm working on where I generate some content server side and then have to use it as my model in the client. – ggalmazor Mar 12 '14 at 11:26
    
Glad I could help. Of course, generally speaking, you'll want to build your server-side content as JSON and have your app manipulate the model based on that, but sometimes it's useful to have other options, and this is but one. – Dan Hunsaker Mar 13 '14 at 23:22

This is a slight modification to the earlier answers...

There is no need for $parse

angular.directive('input', [function () {
  'use strict';

  var directiveDefinitionObject = {
    restrict: 'E',
    require: '?ngModel',
    link: function postLink(scope, iElement, iAttrs, ngModelController) {
      if (iAttrs.value && ngModelController) {
        ngModelController.$setViewValue(iAttrs.value);
      }
    }
  };

  return directiveDefinitionObject;
}]);
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keep in mind that ngModelController.$setViewValue will change the model state to dirty and pristine to false which will also effect the form state which can be pain some time. – Atul Chaudhary May 26 '15 at 2:27

If you use AngularJs ngModel directive, remember that the value of value attribute does not bind on ngModel field.You have to init it by yourself and the best way to do it,is

<input type="text"
       id="rootFolder"
       ng-init="rootFolders = 'Bob'"
       ng-model="rootFolders"
       disabled="disabled"
       value="Bob"
       size="40"/>
share|improve this answer

protected by Pankaj Parkar Jun 11 '15 at 18:51

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