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I am trying to spin a 3D Gameobject in unity. It is actually a cylinder with just a texture of a poker chip on it. I want to spin it 360 degrees once it has collided with a raycast. It is working just fine in the Unity emulator, however, on the device itself the chip comes to a stop after its spin and then continues to spin in an endless loop. Here is a snippet of the code in question. Thank you for any help in advance.

    // Spin the chip
if (Animate) {
    if (Speed > 0 && Chip.tag.Contains("Chip")) {
        Chip.transform.Rotate(0, Speed*Time.deltaTime, 0);
        Speed -= 3;
        Debug.Log(Speed);
    }
    else {
        // Reset
        Animate = false;
        Speed = 360;
        Chip.transform.localRotation = Quaternion.Euler(0.0,0.0,0.0);
    }   
}

To summorize this the best I can the gameobject Chip is assigned when it collides on raycast as such

// Set the chip
    Chip = hit.transform;

Everything is done in the update function. Once the raycast hits it calls a betting function then after the betting is calculated it changes the Boolean Animate to true causing the spinning of the chip.

share|improve this question
    
what is debug.log telling you? –  Robert Levy May 16 '12 at 1:45
    
Debug.Log(Speed) is just showing me the integer speed being counted down is all. –  amedeiros May 16 '12 at 2:13
    
and does it hit 0? keep going after 0? –  Robert Levy May 16 '12 at 2:18
    
Yes it hit's zero and it wouldn't matter if it didn't because the if is while it is greater then 0 so if it skips 0 and hits -1 it still breaks to the else. It is working fine in the emulator just not on the device. –  amedeiros May 16 '12 at 2:41

3 Answers 3

Something is setting Animate = true in some other code, hard to tell whats going on without seeing the rest of it.

Put some debug next to every spot where Animate is set to true, you should see something else setting it, only possible explanation as to why it continues to spin.

Another option is to use the Animation tool and instead of rotating, you just play the animation which performs the rotation for you.

Edit: Chances are its around the touch code, cause when you debug in the editor your using key strokes. A gotcha I've experienced a few times.

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James Gramosli is correct in that some other code is triggering the animation again and it is most likely your touch code. It is a common problem when moving between editor and a touch-enabled device. You can determine if this is the case by using the UnityRemote to verify the control flow of your code.

That said, I would change your code to the following which removes the spin code from the Update loop that runs every frame. It is a small optimization, but primarily it cleans up the architecture and makes it more modular and a little neater.

It is not clear from your code snippet, but I will assume you are using UnityScript.

In your script that handles the touch code when you click on the chip, insert this line:

hit.transform.SendMessage("Spin", hit.transform, SendMessageOptions.DontRequireReceiver);

Put this code in a separate script called "SpinChip" and then add the script to your chip object.

var StartSpeed = 360.0;
var Deceleration = 3.0;

function Spin()
{
    if (Animating)
    {
        print("Chip is already spinning, not starting another animation");
        return;
    }

/*
    This code isn't necessary if this exists in a separate script and is only ever attached to the clickable chip
    if (!gameObject.tag.Contains("Chip"))
    {
        print("That wasn't a chip you clicked");
        return;
    }
*/

    print("Chip has been told to spin");
    StartCoroutine(SpinningAnimation);
}

function SpinningAnimation()
{
    print("Chip spin start");
    transform.localRotation = Quaternion.identity;
    Speed = StartSpeed;
    Animating = true;
    while (Speed > 0)
    {
        transform.Rotate(0, Speed*Time.deltaTime, 0);
        Speed -= Deceleration;
        yield; // wait one frame
    }

    print("Chip has completed the spin");
    Animating = false;
}

What this code does is create a co-routine that runs once per update loop when activated that will spin the chip for you, and is independent of your actual button clicking code.

share|improve this answer
var rotSpeed: float = 60; // degrees per second

function Update(){
  transform.Rotate(0, rotSpeed * Time.deltaTime, 0, Space.World);
}

Here is a code that rotates your game object, you can use it just with a vector 3 :transform.Rotate(x, y, z); or with Space transform.Rotate(x, y, z, Space.World); rotSpeed is the rotation speed.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is not an answer to the question. The question describes a different problem. –  Joetjah Aug 9 '13 at 8:15
    
Sorry i will read the question again. –  user2635745 Aug 10 '13 at 15:02

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