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UPDATE: I have realized the problem below is not possible to answer in its current form because of the large amount of data involved(15k+ items). I just found out, the group I'm trying to help just lets it run for a month then terminates it to use the results(which is why they wanted to get more results in a quicker time). This seems insane to me because they are only using the first few sets of data(the last items in the large lists never get used). So I'm revising this question to get a sample of the intended output(approximation of solutions not full solution). What's the best way to complete this in a smaller amount of time? They seem to want a diverse sample of results, is it genetic algorithms work or some kind of sampling technique? The rest of the question remains the same(same inputs/outputs) but I'm not looking for the complete solution set now(as it will never complete in a lifetime but I hope a parcial list of diverse solutions can).


My problem is not exactly a knapsack problem but its pretty close. Basically, I'm trying to find every combination of X items that equal a specific value. I heard of this problem from a friend of mine who worked in a small school research lab where this process was ran and took about 25 days to complete. Seemed really horrible so I offered to help(benifit to me, is I get to learn and help some really nice people), so I figured out how to scale it by multi-threading it(I'll include the code below), this cut a few days off their processing time but I still wasn't satisfied so I just ported my code to work on a GPU but I don't feel satisfied(although they are happy because its faster and I donated my old video card) because I'm just leveraging hardware and not really any algorithms. Right now, I just brute force the results by checking if the value equals the total and if it does then save the result if it doesn't then keep processing it.

So with that background, is there anything I can do to speed it up algorithmically? My gut tells me no because since they need every combination it seems logically that the computer has to process every combination(which is several billion) but I've seen amazing things here before and even a small speedup can make a difference in days of processing.

I have like over 10 versions of the code but here's a Java version that uses multi-threading(but the logic between this and gpu is pretty much the same).

Basic logic:

for (int c = 100; c >= 0; c--) {
    if (c * x_k == current.sum) { //if result is correct then save
        solutions.add(new Context(0, 0, newcoeff));
        continue;
     } else if (current.k > 0) { //if result is not equal but not end of list then send to queue
         contexts.add(new Context(current.k - 1, current.sum - c * x_k, newcoeff));
     }
 }

Full code:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.ArrayDeque;
import java.util.Queue;
import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentLinkedQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingDeque;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class MixedParallel
{
    // pre-requisite: sorted values !!
    private static final int[] data = new int[] { -5,10,20,30,35 };

    // Context to store intermediate computation or a solution
    static class Context {
        int k;
        int sum;
        int[] coeff;
        Context(int k, int sum, int[] coeff) {
            this.k = k;
            this.sum = sum;
            this.coeff = coeff;
        }
    }

    // Thread pool for parallel execution
    private static ExecutorService executor;
    // Queue to collect solutions
    private static Queue<Context> solutions;

    static {
        final int numberOfThreads = 2;
        executor =
            new ThreadPoolExecutor(numberOfThreads, numberOfThreads, 1000, TimeUnit.SECONDS,
                                   new LinkedBlockingDeque<Runnable>());
        // concurrent because of multi-threaded insertions
        solutions = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<Context>();
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("starting..");
        int target_sum = 100;
        // result vector, init to 0
        int[] coeff = new int[data.length];
        Arrays.fill(coeff, 0);
        mixedPartialSum(data.length - 1, target_sum, coeff);

        executor.shutdown();
        // System.out.println("Over. Dumping results");
        while(!solutions.isEmpty()) {
            Context s = solutions.poll();
            printResult(s.coeff);
        }
    }

    private static void printResult(int[] coeff) {
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        for (int i = coeff.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            if (coeff[i] > 0) {
                sb.append(data[i]).append(" * ").append(coeff[i]).append(" + ");
            }
        }
        System.out.println(sb);
    }

    private static void mixedPartialSum(int k, int sum, int[] coeff) {
        int x_k = data[k];
        for (int c = 0; c <= 100; c++) {
            coeff[k] = c;
            int[] newcoeff = Arrays.copyOf(coeff, coeff.length);
            if (c * x_k == sum) {
                //printResult(newcoeff);
                solutions.add(new Context(0, 0, newcoeff));
                continue;
            } else if (k > 0) {
                if (data.length - k < 2) {
                    mixedPartialSum(k - 1, sum - c * x_k, newcoeff);
                    // for loop on "c" goes on with previous coeff content
                } else {
                    // no longer recursive. delegate to thread pool
                    executor.submit(new ComputePartialSum(new Context(k - 1, sum - c * x_k, newcoeff)));
                }
            }
        }
    }

    static class ComputePartialSum implements Callable<Void> {
        // queue with contexts to process
        private Queue<Context> contexts;

        ComputePartialSum(Context request) {
            contexts = new ArrayDeque<Context>();
            contexts.add(request);
        }

        public Void call() {
            while(!contexts.isEmpty()) {
                Context current = contexts.poll();
                int x_k = data[current.k];
                for (int c = 0; c <= 100; c++) {
                    current.coeff[current.k] = c;
                    int[] newcoeff = Arrays.copyOf(current.coeff, current.coeff.length);
                    if (c * x_k == current.sum) {
                        //printResult(newcoeff);
                        solutions.add(new Context(0, 0, newcoeff));
                        continue;
                    } else if (current.k > 0) {
                        contexts.add(new Context(current.k - 1, current.sum - c * x_k, newcoeff));
                    }
                }
            }
            return null;
        }
    }
}

Here are some of the characteristics of the data/approach:

  • All numbers are shorts(no number seems to exceed a value of +/- 200)
  • There are duplicates(but no zero values)
  • The for loop limits the coefficients to 100(this is a hard number and told it will not change). This bounds the results
  • There is a limit of number of items but its variable and decided by my friends lab. I have been testing with 2 pairs combinations but my friend told me they use 30-35 pairs(its not combinations that involve the entire dataset). This also bounds the results from being out of control
  • My friend mentioned that the post processing they do involves deleting all results that contain less than 30 coefficients or exceed 35. In my current code I break if the newcoeff variable exceeds a number(in this case 35) but maybe there's a way to not even process results that are below 30. This might be a big area to reduce processing time. as now it seems they generate alot of useless data to get to the ones they want.
  • Their dataset is 10k-15k of items(negative/positive)
  • I receive only 3 items, two lists(one data and one id numbers to identify the data) and a target sum. I then save a file with all the combinations of data in that list.
  • I offered to help here because this part took the longest time, before the data comes to me they do something to it(although they do not generate the data themselves) and once I send them the file they apply their own logic to it and process it. Thus, my only focus is taking the 3 inputs and generating the output file.
  • Using threading and GPU has reduced the problem to complete within a week but what I’m looking for here is ideas to improve the algorithm so I can leverage the software instead of just hardware gpu’s to increase speed. As you can see from the code, its just brute force right now. So ideally I would like suggestions that are thread-able.

Update2: I think the problem itself is pretty easy/common but the issue is running it at scale so here's the real data I got when we did a test(its not as large as it gets but its about 3,000 items so if you want to test you don't have to generate it yourself):

private static final int target_sum = 5 * 1000;
private static final List<Integer> data = Arrays.asList( -193, -138, -92, -80, -77, -70, -63, -61, -60, -56, -56, -55, -54, -54, -51, -50, -50, -50, -49, -49, -48, -46, -45, -44, -43, -43, -42, -42, -42, -42, -41, -41, -40, -40, -39, -38, -38, -38, -37, -37, -37, -37, -37, -36, -36, -36, -35, -34, -34, -34, -34, -34, -34, -34, -33, -33, -33, -32, -32, -32, -32, -32, -32, -32, -32, -31, -31, -31, -31, -31, -31, -31, -30, -30, -30, -30, -30, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -28, -28, -28, -28, -27, -27, -27, -27, -26, -26, -26, -26, -26, -26, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22, -21, -21, -21, -21, -21, -21, -21, -20, -20, -20, -20, -20, -20, -20, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, 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1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 26, 26, 26, 26, 26, 26, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 29, 29, 29, 29, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 31, 31, 31, 31, 31, 32, 32, 32, 32, 33, 33, 33, 33, 34, 34, 34, 34, 34, 34, 34, 35, 35, 35, 35, 36, 36, 36, 36, 37, 37, 38, 39, 39, 39, 40, 41, 41, 41, 41, 41, 42, 42, 43, 43, 44, 45, 45, 46, 47, 47, 48, 48, 49, 49, 50, 54, 54, 54, 55, 55, 56, 56, 57, 57, 57, 57, 57, 58, 58, 58, 59, 60, 66, 67, 68, 70, 72, 73, 73, 84, 84, 86, 92, 98, 99, 105, 114, 118, 120, 121, 125, 156);

I'm learning programming and algorithms so if I missed anything or something does not make sense please let me know. please note I understand that this may seem imposible because of the large data but its not(I have seen it run and a variation of it has been running for years). Please don't let the scale distract from the real problem, if you use 10 variables and its 10% faster then my 10 variable brute force then I'm sure it'll be faster on larger data. I'm not looking to blow the lights out, I'm looking for small improvements(or larger design improvements) that provide even slightly faster results(I'll study every suggestion). Also if there's any assumptions that need to relaxed let me know.

Thanks!

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1  
Showing us code says nothing about your data set. Are there bounds on your inputs, or other characterization? What precisely is the problem? Without knowing the precise problem definition it's hard to come up with shortcuts. See here for my "shortcut" to summing values from 1 to 10 that add to X, for instance, where the input restriction opens the door to optimization (Note: it's from 2004, haven't really looked at it since): hostilefork.com/2004/10/10/summing-numbers-puzzle –  HostileFork May 16 '12 at 2:29
    
@HostileFork Thank you for your link. Regarding data, the program takes a list of int's as input(in the code above its variable data, the combination target is int variable target_sum, and all possible combinations are outputted. There's no other constraints. –  Lostsoul May 16 '12 at 2:39
    
My point isn't about the API as it's defined, but rather what the numbers in the API actually represent. Optimizations usually arise from realizing the specificity of the problem, instead of trying to solve it once it has been generalized. For instance, there are foundational limits on how fast you can find the sqrt(x) if x were an arbitrary value, but it could be done much faster if you always knew that x = y^2 and you knew the value of y! –  HostileFork May 16 '12 at 2:50
1  
When I need speed, Java isn't what I use. I use C or C++. –  Tony Ennis May 16 '12 at 3:01
1  
Crowdsource 40 PCs and get it done in a day? –  Tony Ennis May 16 '12 at 3:08
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9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+100

This uses dynamic programming to solve the same problem you gave in the example. It's been updated to deal with duplicate values by keeping track of the value's index rather than its value, and to correct a bug which omitted some solutions.

public class TurboAdder {
    private static final int[] data = new int[] { 5, 10, 20, 25, 40, 50 };

    private static class Node {
        public final int index;
        public final int count;
        public final Node prevInList;
        public final int prevSum;
        public Node(int index, int count, Node prevInList, int prevSum) {
            this.index = index;
            this.count = count;
            this.prevInList = prevInList;
            this.prevSum = prevSum;
        }
    }

    private static int target = 100;
    private static Node sums[] = new Node[target+1];

    // Only for use by printString.
    private static boolean forbiddenValues[] = new boolean[data.length];

    public static void printString(String prev, Node n) {
        if (n == null) {
            System.out.println(prev);
        } else {
            while (n != null) {
                int idx = n.index;
                // We prevent recursion on a value already seen.
                if (!forbiddenValues[idx]) {
                    forbiddenValues[idx] = true;
                    printString((prev == null ? "" : (prev+" + "))+data[idx]+"*"+n.count, sums[n.prevSum]);
                    forbiddenValues[idx] = false;
                }
                n = n.prevInList;
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
            int value = data[i];
            for (int count = 1, sum = value; count <= 100 && sum <= target; count++, sum += value) {
                for (int newsum = sum+1; newsum <= target; newsum++) {
                    if (sums[newsum - sum] != null) {
                        sums[newsum] = new Node(i, count, sums[newsum], newsum - sum);
                    }
                }
            }
            for (int count = 1, sum = value; count <= 100 && sum <= target; count++, sum += value) {
                sums[sum] = new Node(i, count, sums[sum], 0);
            }
        }
        printString(null, sums[target]);

    }
}
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Thanks Martin, it looks really good I'm very impressed at its speed. Often they seem to break down after 10 or more items but this was pretty strong up until about 20(in the lab they have 10,000-15,000 items). Memory usage is nice & low, but after using threading I don't think I can turn back(it allow allows me to scale onto multiple machines, the current code only uses a single core). Over the weekend I'll study your code more and try to write in a way that I can thread it(probably using a shared queue like above). I'll test it at let you know. –  Lostsoul May 17 '12 at 5:09
    
@Lostsoul your code stalled on my machine after outputting one result, so I couldn't really compare the two. I had no idea you were working with instances so large. There are other optimizations we can make - for example, if we have a linked list of populated values, main's first inner for loop can run much faster. In the main method, each of the two inner for loops could potentially be threaded, but you should gather the contexts between the two or you would form excess links. As for printString, parallelizing on the recursive calls is easy but forbiddenValues must be carried per thread. –  Martin Hock May 17 '12 at 6:07
    
Thanks, I'll play around and study your approach. To be honest from my intail tests the nested for loops in main don't seem to take long at all. The bulk vast bulk of the time seems to be in printString section(less than 1 second in the for loop, but 220 in the printString method using 30 variables on my laptop..To reduce delay of output to screen I commented out the displaying). Would it be enough for forbiddenValues to have its own instance per thread? or does it need to be globally updated? I'm thinking of blocking/sync issues as I launch many threads. (by the way, I fixed the code above) –  Lostsoul May 18 '12 at 3:49
    
Also, if I test with a negative int then I get an out of bounds error @ if (sums[newsum - sum] != null) { when newsum = 96 and sum = -5 Also if it helps, I updated my question with actual data I used to test against. –  Lostsoul May 18 '12 at 4:33
1  
Martin, I'm trying to understand your code, but I'm confused about a couple of things. What is forbiddenValues for? It seems to me that you are trying to exclude duplicates from the output, but if you do that don't you end up with the wrong sum in the end? Also, in the line sums[newsum] = new Node(i, count, sums[newsum], sums[newsum - sum]); why are you saving the current head of the list from sums[newsum - sum]? Shouldn't you just be storing newsum-sum in the Node and always using sums[x] to find the head of the list? Otherwise you miss later additions. –  Old Pro May 19 '12 at 11:10
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The problem you are trying to solve is called number partitioning. It is a special case of the knapsack problem. If the values are all integers and you are trying to get to value M, then then you can find a single solution in O(n*M) time. To enumerate all combinations could be exponential because there are potentially an exponential number of solutions.

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To solve this with dynamic programming, all the costs need to be non-negative integers, and you need an array as long as the total cost you are trying to achieve - each element of the array corresponds to solutions for the cost represented by its offset in the array. Since you want all solutions, each element of the array should be a list of last components of a solution. You can reduce the size of this list by requiring that the last component of a solution cost at least as much as any other component of the solution.

Given this, once you have filled in the array up to length N, you fill entry N+1 by considering every possible item at each of its 100 multiplicities. For each such item you subtract (multiplicity times cost) from N+1 and see that to get a total cost of N+1 you can use this item plus any solution for cost N+1-thisCost. So you look in the array - back at an entry you have already filled in - to see if there is a solution for N+1-thisCost and, if so, and if the current cost*multiplicity is at least as high as some item in array[N+1-thisCost], you can add an entry for item,multiplicity at offset N+1.

Once you have the array extended to whatever your target cost is, you can work backwords from array[finalCost], looking at the answers there and subtracting off their cost to find out what array[finalCost - costOfAnswerHere] to look at to find the full solution.

This solution doesn't have an obvious parallel version, but sometimes the speedups with dynamic programming are good enough that it might still be faster - in this case a lot depends on how large the final cost is.

This is a bit different from normal dynamic programming because you want every answer - hopefully it will still give you some sort of advantage. Come to think of it, it might be better to simply have a possible/impossible flag in the array saying whether or not there is a solution for that array's offset, and then repeat the check for possible combinations when you trace back.

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All the costs need to be non-negative integers, don't they? Otherwise the size of the solution array is unbounded. Well, not unbounded, but not bounded to a small, easily determined number. –  Old Pro May 19 '12 at 6:41
    
If the costs include both +ve and -ve integers it's not just the size of the solution array that could be unbounded. If you can express zero as a sum of +ve and -ve costs then "every combination of X items that equal a specific value" becomes an infinite set. If not, then you might be able to do some sort of pre-processing step to work out the accessible sums of +ve and -ve costs <= the target and use that as a building block, but it does look awfully complicated. –  mcdowella May 19 '12 at 9:52
    
Come to think of it, given A and (-B) we have B * A + A * (-B) = 0 so a mix of +ve and -ve costs means infinitely many solutions. –  mcdowella May 19 '12 at 10:38
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There are 137 unique values (ignoring the repeats) in the sample data given.

If you concede that nearly any combination of 30 distinct values pulled from the data at random can be massaged into at least one valid solution by adjusting the coefficients, then there must be at least C(137,30)=1.54E30 solutions with exactly 30 terms (and another 5.31E30 with 31 terms, 1.76E31 with 32 terms, 5.60E31 with 33 terms, etc).

So, if your goal is just a sampling of valid solutions, and not an impossible exhaustive list, then I submit that an ideal approach is to select your target number of terms at random and then adjust their coefficients to reach the target value to produce a single sample, and repeat for the desired number of samples.

Below is a program that applies this technique. On my fairly modest laptop (1.3Ghz AMD E-300), I produced 15000 unique solutions in 2.249 seconds targeting 32 terms per sample.

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Map.Entry;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.TreeMap;

public class ComboGen {

    private static final int[] data = { -193, -138, -92, -80, -77, -70, -63, -61, -60, -56, -56, -55, -54, -54, -51, -50, -50,
            -50, -49, -49, -48, -46, -45, -44, -43, -43, -42, -42, -42, -42, -41, -41, -40, -40, -39, -38, -38, -38, -37, -37,
            -37, -37, -37, -36, -36, -36, -35, -34, -34, -34, -34, -34, -34, -34, -33, -33, -33, -32, -32, -32, -32, -32, -32,
            -32, -32, -31, -31, -31, -31, -31, -31, -31, -30, -30, -30, -30, -30, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29, -29,
            -28, -28, -28, -28, -27, -27, -27, -27, -26, -26, -26, -26, -26, -26, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -25, -24,
            -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -24, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -23, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22, -22,
            -22, -22, -22, -21, -21, -21, -21, -21, -21, -21, -20, -20, -20, -20, -20, -20, -20, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19,
            -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -19, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18, -18,
            -18, -18, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -17, -16, -16, -16, -16,
            -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -16, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15,
            -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -15, -14, -14, -14, -14,
            -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -14, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13,
            -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13, -13,
            -13, -13, -13, -13, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12,
            -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -12, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11,
            -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -11, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10,
            -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -10,
            -10, -10, -10, -10, -10, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9,
            -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9,
            -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -9, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8,
            -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -8, -7,
            -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7,
            -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7,
            -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -7, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6,
            -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6,
            -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -6,
            -6, -6, -6, -6, -6, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5,
            -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5,
            -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5, -5,
            -5, -5, -5, -5, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4,
            -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4,
            -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4,
            -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4,
            -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -4, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3,
            -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3,
            -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3,
            -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3,
            -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -3, -2, -2, -2, -2,
            -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
            -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
            -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
            -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
            -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
            -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
            -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
            -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
            -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
            -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
            1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
            1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
            1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
            1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2,
            2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
            2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
            2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
            2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3,
            3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
            3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
            3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
            3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4,
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4,
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4,
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5,
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5,
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5,
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6,
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6,
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8,
            8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8,
            8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9,
            9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10,
            10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10,
            10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11,
            11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12,
            12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13,
            13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 13, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14,
            14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15,
            15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 15, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16,
            16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18,
            18, 18, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21,
            21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 24,
            24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 26, 26,
            26, 26, 26, 26, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 27, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 29, 29, 29, 29, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30,
            30, 30, 31, 31, 31, 31, 31, 32, 32, 32, 32, 33, 33, 33, 33, 34, 34, 34, 34, 34, 34, 34, 35, 35, 35, 35, 36, 36, 36,
            36, 37, 37, 38, 39, 39, 39, 40, 41, 41, 41, 41, 41, 42, 42, 43, 43, 44, 45, 45, 46, 47, 47, 48, 48, 49, 49, 50, 54,
            54, 54, 55, 55, 56, 56, 57, 57, 57, 57, 57, 58, 58, 58, 59, 60, 66, 67, 68, 70, 72, 73, 73, 84, 84, 86, 92, 98, 99,
            105, 114, 118, 120, 121, 125, 156 };

    private static Map<Integer, Integer> buildCounts(int[] rawData) {
        Map<Integer, Integer> buckets = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
        int i = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < rawData.length; i++) {
            if (buckets.containsKey(rawData[i])) {
                buckets.put(rawData[i], buckets.get(rawData[i]) + 1);
            } else {
                buckets.put(rawData[i], 1);
            }
        }
        weights = new int[buckets.size()];
        counts = new int[buckets.size()];
        i = 0;
        for (Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : buckets.entrySet()) {
            weights[i] = entry.getKey();
            counts[i] = entry.getValue();
            i++;
        }
        return buckets;
    }

    private static int[] weights;
    private static int[] counts;
    private static Random random = new Random(System.nanoTime());

    private static int[] placeChips(int[] chips, int targetPairs) {
        int unplaced = targetPairs;
        int[] placements = new int[unplaced];
        Arrays.fill(chips, 0);
        if (unplaced > chips.length) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Coefficient pairs must not exceed unique data values.");
        }
        while (unplaced > 0) {
            int idx = random.nextInt(counts.length);
            if (chips[idx] == 0) {
                chips[idx] = 1 + random.nextInt(100);
                unplaced--;
            }
        }
        int ppos = 0;
        for (int cpos = 0; cpos < chips.length; cpos++) {
            if (chips[cpos] > 0) {
                placements[ppos++] = cpos;
            }
        }
        return placements;
    }

    static int sum(int[] chips) {
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < chips.length; i++) {
            sum += weights[i] * chips[i];
        }
        return sum;
    }

    public static void adjustFactors(int[] chips, int[] placements, int target) {
        int sum = sum(chips);
        Map<Integer, Integer> weightIdx = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
        for (int placement : placements) {
            weightIdx.put(weights[placement], placement);
        }
        while (sum != target) {
            // System.out.print(sum + ",");
            int idx = 0;
            if ((sum > target) && weightIdx.containsKey(sum - target) && (chips[weightIdx.get(sum - target)] > 1)) {
                idx = weightIdx.get(sum - target);
            } else if ((sum < target) && weightIdx.containsKey(sum - target) && (chips[weightIdx.get(sum - target)] > 1)) {
                idx = weightIdx.get(sum - target);
            } else if ((sum > target) && weightIdx.containsKey(target - sum) && chips[weightIdx.get(target - sum)] < 100) {
                idx = weightIdx.get(target - sum);
            } else if ((sum < target) && weightIdx.containsKey(target - sum) && chips[weightIdx.get(target - sum)] < 100) {
                idx = weightIdx.get(target - sum);
            } else {
                idx = placements[random.nextInt(placements.length)];
            }
            int weight = weights[idx];
            if (sum < target) {
                if (weight > 0 && chips[idx] < 100) {
                    chips[idx]++;
                    sum += weight;
                } else if (weight < 0 && chips[idx] > 1) {
                    chips[idx]--;
                    sum -= weight;
                }
            } else {
                if (weight > 0 && chips[idx] > 1) {
                    chips[idx]--;
                    sum -= weight;
                } else if (weight < 0 && chips[idx] < 100) {
                    chips[idx]++;
                    sum += weight;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static String oneRandomSet(int targetSum, int targetPairs) {
        int[] chips = new int[counts.length];
        int[] placements = placeChips(chips, targetPairs);
        adjustFactors(chips, placements, targetSum);
        int sum = sum(chips);
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        for (int placement : placements) {
            sb.append(weights[placement]);
            sb.append(" * ");
            sb.append(chips[placement]);
            sb.append(" + ");
        }
        sb.setLength(sb.length() - 2);
        sb.append(" = ");
        sb.append(sum);
        sb.append("\n");
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] ARGV) {
        int targetSum = 5000;
        int targetPairs = 32;
        int targetResults = 15000; // Produce this many solutions
        buildCounts(data);
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        long timer = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < targetResults; i++) {
            sb.append(oneRandomSet(targetSum, targetPairs));
        }
        double seconds = (System.nanoTime() - timer) / 1000000000d;
        double millisPerSol = 1000 * seconds / targetResults;
        System.out.println(sb.toString());
        System.out.println(String.format("%d solutions in %1.3f seconds @ %1.3f millis per sol", targetResults, seconds,
                millisPerSol));
    }

}
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you might like to check "Dynamic Programming" concept , dynamic programming mainly saves huge time unlike the normal recursion ; since it avoids re-computing values by saving them in a form of 2D array , this tutorial might help you

Note : Knapsack problem is considered the introduction problem to Dynamic programming , searching for "knapsack dynamic programming" would help you more

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2  
Care to elaborate, as is this answer is more of a comment. –  Scott Chamberlain May 16 '12 at 3:06
    
I did initially and would love to revisit it but I found the ones I used very recursive which made running threads or in a gpu alot more difficult. If you have any ideas I'd be more than happy to try a different approach. –  Lostsoul May 16 '12 at 3:08
    
this is the only thing I found so far: ww2.cs.mu.oz.au/~pjs/papers/paralleldp.pdf once I find a different approach I'll be glad to suggest it here –  a.u.r May 16 '12 at 3:25
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Edit: I'm keeping this answer (for now at least) to preserve the comment thread

OK, I'm confused, but I'll post my thoughts anyway and edit/delete them later if I'm wrong. If I'm really far off the mark, you can just say so and I'll delete this whole answer.

First of all, it looks to me that since zero is a valid data value and zero works in all positions, you are getting yourself into extra trouble computing all those combinations. Worse, it looks to me like your algorithm has an actual bug in that it will miss some combinations where a combination of items toward the beginning of the list sum to zero, since you terminate that thread of investigation once you find a combination of items toward the end of the list that yields the target sum.

Next, it looks to me like for every item in the list, you are trying 100 (actually 101) different values: x*100, x*99, ..., x*0. If I am right, than it follows that the size of the problem space is 100^n where n is the number of data elements. There is no possible way you are examining that for n=100 let alone n=10,000. The only way your program could even be terminating is because you find sums at the end of the list and terminate those threads of investigation. (Oh right, now you tell me you terminate threads when the number of elements with non-zero coefficients exceeds 3, no 50, no 60, no some variable number. The problem space is still too big.)

In fact, by my count, your test data has 283 zeros. So you can add 100^283 combinations of those data elements times [1,100] to any other answer you get. Given the number of particles in the universe is estimated to be 10^80, 100^283 combinations would be impossible to print on paper.

Or else I've gotten something wrong. If so, please clue me in.

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Thank you for the answer old Pro..your right this is not right. I checked the other test data and there are no zeros in it. I texted my friend and asked and he said he quickly looked and there are no zeros as well. I'm not sure how it got into my file, but I deleted it and updated my answer. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Lostsoul May 18 '12 at 13:31
    
I thought about what your saying and I'm not really sure its impossible. Running similar data to above, it does stop after a month(week on gpu) and gives them the results they seem to want. This is just using a very similar version to the brute force one above. I've been thinking, do you think it makes sense to process the negative and positive values separately then combine them in the end? Seems blazing fast when solutions are positive(negatives cause the huge run up in time). –  Lostsoul May 18 '12 at 13:56
    
Also, for simplicity I didn't include this info but we do limit the actual results(its kind of outside this core problem). Out of 3000, its not a full combination of all 3000, from what I see its 50 or so combinations. –  Lostsoul May 18 '12 at 14:09
    
@Lostsoul, whatever limits you have on the results are not outside the problem, because the problem is picking results. It looks to me like your program stops after it finds one combination for each possible coefficient of the last value on the list. Otherwise duplicates alone would cause an explosion in the size of the result set. –  Old Pro May 18 '12 at 18:33
    
No doubt its alot of processing but it does currently work(running the above data using the above code on a 4 core cpu should complete in about 25 days). What I'm trying to do is find a faster way..Your 100% correct with the problem of counter items(+/-1) causing exponential growth but it has a bound of 100 per item and limits of number of items so the work does ultimately complete. Are you saying there is nothing that can be done to make it faster then the brute force approach? –  Lostsoul May 18 '12 at 18:44
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Your code does not match your problem statement and it is therefore unclear how to proceed.

You say that the data list contains negative values and contains duplicates. You give an example which does both. In fact, the values are limited to non-zero integers in the range [-200,200] but the data list is at least 2,000 and typically 10,000 or more, so there would have to be duplicates.

Let's review your "basic logic":

for (int c = 100; c >= 0; c--) {
    if (c * x_k == current.sum) { //if result is correct then save
        solutions.add(new Context(0, 0, newcoeff));
        continue;
     } else if (current.k > 0) { // recurse with next data element
         contexts.add(new Context(current.k - 1, current.sum - c * x_k, newcoeff));
     }
}

Elsewhere you state that the data must be sorted in numerical order and you start from the tail of the list, k = n -1 (because of zero indexing), so you start with the biggest ones first. The then clause terminates the recursion. While this may be fine in the problem you are solving, it is not the problem you are describing, because it ignores all the combinations of lesser data values that sum to zero.

On the other hand, all the combinations of greater values that sum to zero would be included.

Let's look, for example, at the last item on your example list, 156, with target sum 5000.

156 * 100 = 15600 so it will not match the target sum until you get into the negative numbers. Of course

(100 * -100) + (100 * -6) + (100 * 156) = 5000

and this combination works. (Your sample data set does not include a -100, but it does have two -40s and a -20, so if you want to be true to the data set combine them instead. I'm using -100 to keep the example simple and because you say the data set could include -100.)

But of course

(100 * -100) + (100 * -6) + (c * -1) + (c * 1) + (100 * 156) = 5000 

for any c, so you will have 100 combinations like this in the output (1 <= c <= 100). But you have 50 in the data set. When you get to 100 * 50 = 5000 you terminate the recursion, so you will never get

(c * -1) + (c * 1) + (100 * 50) = 5000 

So either your code or your problem statement is buggy. Probably both, because even without considering the coefficients, 10,000 items taken 60 at a time yields on the order of 10^158 combinations, but aside from this premature termination of recursion, I see nothing that would prevent you from having to test the value of the sum of all those combinations, and even if there were zero cost in computing the values, you could not do that many comparisons.

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If you do not have to have exhaustive and precise solution, you can try to approximate the problem. The program will then run in pseudo-polynomial or even polynomial time.

See http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knapsack_problem#Approximation_algorithms

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I may be wrong but could this be viewed as a integer partition (was Triangle number, but I remembered I misremembered ) problem?

If that's the case, each entry would have a membership to a set of results for a given sum. Precalculating and caching the membership results for a given sum (yes a huge table) could form a very quick solution.

I could probably do it, but I'd need a large data set. Interesting though...

Consult the guru Knuth http://cs.utsa.edu/~wagner/knuth/fasc3b.pdf

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