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I have a set of HTML files with illegal syntax in the href attribute of <a> tags. For example,

<a name="Conductor, "neutral""></a>

or

<meta name="keywords" content="Conductor, "hot",Conductor, "neutral",Hot wire,Neutral wire,Double insulation,Conductor, "ground",Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Arc fault circuit interrupter,Arc fault breaker,AFCI," />

or

<b>Table of Contents:</b><ul class="xoxo"><li><a href="1.html" title="Page 1: What are "series" and "parallel" circuits?">What are "series" and "parallel" circuits?</a>

I'm trying to process the files with Perl's XML::Twig module using parsefile_html($file_name). When it reads a file that has this syntax, it gives this error:

x has an invalid attribute name 'y""' at C:/strawberry/perl/site/lib/XML/Twig.pm line 893

What I need is either a way to make the module accept the bad syntax and deal with it, or a regular expression to find and replace double quotes in attributes with single quotes.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given your html sample, the code below works:

use Modern::Perl;

my $html = <<end;
<meta name="keywords" content="Conductor, "hot",Conductor, "neutral",Hot wire,Neutral wire,Double insulation,Conductor, "ground",Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Arc fault circuit interrupter,Arc fault breaker,AFCI," />
<a name="Conductor, "neutral""></a>
end

$html =~ s/(?<=content=")(.*?)(?="\s*\/>)/do{my $capture = $1; $capture =~ s|"||g;$capture}/eg;
$html =~ s/(?<=name=")(.*?)(?="\s*>)/do{my $capture = $1; $capture =~ s|"||g;$capture}/eg;

say $html;

Output:

<meta name="keywords" content="Conductor, hot,Conductor, neutral,Hot wire,Neutral wire,Double insulation,Conductor, ground,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Arc fault circuit interrupter,Arc fault breaker,AFCI," />
<a name="Conductor, neutral"></a>

I'm concerned that a variable length look-behind is not implemented, so if there's some space before or after the equals signs, the pattern match will fail. However, it's most likely that the pages were consistently created, so the match will not fail.

Of course, try the substitutions on copies of the files, first.

share|improve this answer
    
Works great! That's quite an intense pair of regexes. I'll accept your answer, but some comments on it would be helpful. – Nate Glenn May 16 '12 at 4:34
    
Oops! Didn't quite work on this string: <a href="1.html" title="Page 1: What are "series" and "parallel" circuits?"> – Nate Glenn May 16 '12 at 4:39
    
Repeat the second substitution (add another) using (?<=title="). The match tries to capture everything between a parameter's enclosing double quotes, and then executes another substitution to remove the extra quotes in what it found, and then substitutes the old with the new. – Kenosis May 16 '12 at 5:00
    
Got it! Worked so I'll accept. But it would probably be nice to find a more general solution... – Nate Glenn May 16 '12 at 6:21

The only way I can think of to do this reasonably safely is to use two nested evaluated (/e) substitutions. The program below uses this idea and works with your data.

The outer substitution finds all tags in the string, and replaces them with a tag containing adjusted attribute values.

The inner subtitution finds all attribute values in the tag, and replaces them with the same value with all double-quotes removed.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $html = <<'HTML';
<meta name="keywords" content="Conductor, "hot",Conductor, "neutral",Hot wire,Neutral wire,Double insulation,Conductor, "ground",Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Arc fault circuit interrupter,Arc fault breaker,AFCI," />
<a name="Conductor, "neutral""></a>
<a href="1.html" title="Page 1: What are "series" and "parallel" circuits?">
HTML

$html =~ s{(<[^>]+>)}{

  my $tag = $1;

  $tag =~ s{ \w+= " \K ( [^=<>]+ ) (?= " (?: \s+\w+= | \s*/?> )) }
  {
    (my $attr = $1) =~ tr/"//d;
    $attr;
  }egx;

  $tag;
}eg;

print $html;

output

<meta name="keywords" content="Conductor, hot,Conductor, neutral,Hot wire,Neutral wire,Double insulation,Conductor, ground,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Ground fault,GFCI,Ground Fault Current Interrupter,Arc fault circuit interrupter,Arc fault breaker,AFCI," />
<a name="Conductor, neutral"></a>
<a href="1.html" title="Page 1: What are series and parallel circuits?">
share|improve this answer
    
This is excellent, Borodin. The two steps you've taken in your solution makes a lot of sense. – Kenosis May 16 '12 at 14:48
    
I once had a > in an attribute value. That was a sucky day when I was still matching tags like this. :) – brian d foy May 16 '12 at 20:54
    
@brian: I guessed they had to be encoded as &gt; - even in attributes. I've never had a day like that yet! – Borodin May 17 '12 at 0:10

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