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I normalize a vector V in MATLAB as following:

normalized_V = V/norm(V);

however, is it the most elegant (efficient) way to normalize a vector in MATLAB?

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closed as not constructive by Andrew Barber Apr 24 '13 at 6:48

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Isn't it the L1 norm that needs to be taken when normalizing? normalized = v / norm(v, 1); –  zvezda Apr 23 '13 at 21:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 32 down vote accepted

The original code you suggest is the best way.

Matlab is extremely good at vectorized operations such as this, at least for large vectors.

The built-in norm function is very fast. Here are some timing results:

V = rand(10000000,1);
% Run once
tic; V1=V/norm(V); toc           % result:  0.228273s
tic; V2=V/sqrt(sum(V.*V)); toc   % result:  0.325161s
tic; V1=V/norm(V); toc           % result:  0.218892s

V1 is calculated a second time here just to make sure there are no important cache penalties on the first call.

Timing information here was produced with R2008a x64 on Windows.


EDIT:

Revised answer based on gnovice's suggestions (see comments). Matrix math (barely) wins:

clc; clear all;
V = rand(1024*1024*32,1);
N = 10;
tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V/norm(V);         end; toc % 6.3 s
tic; for i=1:N, V2 = V/sqrt(sum(V.*V)); end; toc % 9.3 s
tic; for i=1:N, V3 = V/sqrt(V'*V);      end; toc % 6.2 s ***
tic; for i=1:N, V4 = V/sqrt(sum(V.^2)); end; toc % 9.2 s
tic; for i=1:N, V1=V/norm(V);           end; toc % 6.4 s

IMHO, the difference between "norm(V)" and "sqrt(V'V)" is small enough that for most programs, it's best to go with the one that's more clear. To me, "norm(V)" is clearer and easier to read, but "sqrt(V'V)" is still idiomatic in Matlab.

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1  
Just out of curiosity, how fast would these run?: V3 = V/sqrt(V'*V); V4 = V/sqrt(sum(V.^2)); –  gnovice Jun 30 '09 at 2:36
2  
I agree that norm(V) is the most straight-forward answer, since there is little speed gain with sqrt(V'*V). The speed-up would be even less significant for the typical three-element vector that V usually is most of the times I use norm. –  gnovice Jun 30 '09 at 3:19
2  
@gnovice: surprisingly, for 3-vectors, norm is about 3x faster than sqrt(V'*V). I'm wondering if MathWorks is using some SSE tricks for small vectors (though I'd expect those to work for large ones too). –  Mr Fooz Jul 1 '09 at 1:56
1  
Hmm, interesting. I guess matrix operations only pay off for large vectors/matrices... that kinda makes sense. Maybe there's some loop-unrolling or other some such optimization going on for 3-vectors? –  gnovice Jul 1 '09 at 3:47
    
In Octave the V'*V version is faster than all the others by about 50% and with user1344784's suggestion we get another 30%. –  twerdster May 14 '11 at 1:00

I don't know any MATLAB and I've never used it, but it seems to me you are dividing. Why? Something like this will be much faster:

d = 1/norm(V)
V1 = V * d
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And that gives another 30% speedup in Octave. Well spotted –  twerdster May 14 '11 at 1:02
    
Why is this faster? You are still dividing 1. –  jnovacho Oct 8 at 11:23
    
@jnovacho it is faster because you are doing only one division and n multiplication, where n is the length of your vector. Otherwise, you would be doing n divisions. Division is more expensive than multiplication. –  Arlen Oct 11 at 16:58

The only problem you would run into is if the norm of V is zero (or very close to it). This could give you Inf or NaN when you divide, along with a divide-by-zero warning. If you don't care about getting an Inf or NaN, you can just turn the warning on and off using WARNING:

oldState = warning('off','MATLAB:divideByZero');  % Return previous state then
                                                  %   turn off DBZ warning
uV = V/norm(V);
warning(oldState);  % Restore previous state

If you don't want any Inf or NaN values, you have to check the size of the norm first:

normV = norm(V);
if normV > 0,  % Or some other threshold, like EPS
  uV = V/normV;
else,
  uV = V;  % Do nothing since it's basically 0
end

If I need it in a program, I usually put the above code in my own function, usually called unit (since it basically turns a vector into a unit vector pointing in the same direction).

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I took Mr. Fooz's code and also added Arlen's solution too and here are the timings that I've gotten for Octave:

clc; clear all;
V = rand(1024*1024*32,1);
N = 10;
tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V/norm(V);         end; toc % 7.0 s
tic; for i=1:N, V2 = V/sqrt(sum(V.*V)); end; toc % 6.4 s
tic; for i=1:N, V3 = V/sqrt(V'*V);      end; toc % 5.5 s
tic; for i=1:N, V4 = V/sqrt(sum(V.^2)); end; toc % 6.6 s
tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V/norm(V);         end; toc % 7.1 s
tic; for i=1:N, d = 1/norm(V); V1 = V*d;end; toc % 4.7 s

Then, because of something I'm currently looking at, I tested out this code for ensuring that each row sums to 1:

clc; clear all;
m = 2048;
V = rand(m);
N = 100;
tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V ./ (sum(V,2)*ones(1,m));                end; toc % 8.2 s
tic; for i=1:N, V2 = bsxfun(@rdivide, V, sum(V,2));            end; toc % 5.8 s
tic; for i=1:N, V3 = bsxfun(@rdivide, V, V*ones(m,1));         end; toc % 5.7 s
tic; for i=1:N, V4 = V ./ (V*ones(m,m));                       end; toc % 77.5 s
tic; for i=1:N, d = 1./sum(V,2);V5 = bsxfun(@times, V, d);     end; toc % 2.83 s
tic; for i=1:N, d = 1./(V*ones(m,1));V6 = bsxfun(@times, V, d);end; toc % 2.75 s
tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V ./ (sum(V,2)*ones(1,m));                end; toc % 8.2 s
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By the rational of making everything multiplication I add the entry at the end of the list

    clc; clear all;
    V = rand(1024*1024*32,1);
    N = 10;
    tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V/norm(V);         end; toc % 4.5 s
    tic; for i=1:N, V2 = V/sqrt(sum(V.*V)); end; toc % 7.5 s
    tic; for i=1:N, V3 = V/sqrt(V'*V);      end; toc % 4.9 s
    tic; for i=1:N, V4 = V/sqrt(sum(V.^2)); end; toc % 6.8 s
    tic; for i=1:N, V1 = V/norm(V);         end; toc % 4.7 s
    tic; for i=1:N, d = 1/norm(V); V1 = V*d;end; toc % 4.9 s
    tic; for i=1:N, d = norm(V)^-1; V1 = V*d;end;toc % 4.4 s
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Fastest by far (time is in comparison to Jacobs):

clc; clear all;
V = rand(1024*1024*32,1);
N = 10;
tic; 
for i=1:N, 
    d = 1/sqrt(V(1)*V(1)+V(2)*V(2)+V(3)*V(3)); 
    V1 = V*d;
end; 
toc % 1.5s
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