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I have been tinkering on NodeJS for a while now. I still don't seem to understand how Node actually runs. Maybe it's just that I can't shed off the PHP mindset. I know it's pretty different from PHP, but still I can't grasp the idea - especially when they keep repeating the terms event-loop, event-driven and REPL.

  • Does the code run "forever" when it gets started? Is it like a big 'ol browser window in the back-end that the all the clients look at and which listens to some sort of onRequest event from them?

  • Or is every request an isolated sandbox? Where the code runs for every request, separated from the other requests?

I've seen demos of socket connection chat in the videos, and it seems like it runs like the first point describes. But wouldn't that be "wierd" where all people access the same "space"?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Node code need not run forever. The typical use case you see uses Node as an http server (which by the way is one of the selling points of Node; a basic http server in about 5 lines of code) which therefore runs forever.
  2. Individual requests are isolated because they are handled or responded to in callbacks. Callbacks use a concept called closures which ensures that the state of the callback is maintained when it is called. So each response would be a callback which persists it's state. Here's a nice link about closures and callbacks.
  3. These callbacks run asynchronously so the main event loop is free to handle further requests.
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1  
Just a supplement: Individual requests are only as isolated as you make them to be. A callback is called for each request, but you are easily able to share resources between requests because the requests are handled in the same program. –  Alexander Varwijk May 16 '12 at 8:44

Does the code run "forever" when it gets started? Is it like a big 'ol browser window in the back-end that the all the clients look at and which listens to some sort of onRequest event from them?

What do you refer to as the 'code' ? Once you start a http server, by calling the listen function, yes it runs forever, until you kill the process.

Or is every request an isolated sandbox? Where the code runs for every request, separated from the other requests?

Every incoming request (HttpGet, HttpPost) is handled in a function. For the sake of simplicity I won't use the term callback. This function is a non-blocking asynchronous function. In Javascript, all functions are sort of isolated sandboxes, yet they have access to global variables.

http.createServer(onRequest).listen(80);
var xvz;
function onRequest() {
 var abc;
}

In the above code snippet, abc is in an isolated sandbox. However, abc can still access xyz.

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The resulting program, of your code, is persistent. Just as you describe it is as if it was a big old browser window, receiving requests and replying to them.

Read the following example.

var http = request("http");
var shared = 1;

function procreq (req, res)
{
    var notshared = 1;
    res.writeHead(200, { "Content-Type": "text/plain" });
    res.end(String(shared++) +  ', ' + String(notshared++));
}

var server = http.createServer(procreq);
server.listen(8080);

By running that server example you can see how the program is persistent and the shared variable is visible for all requests, it is a real server-shared variable. I think, if I recall correctly, that in PHP you can achieve this with memcached (or is it APC?).

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